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Plenty of bikes are available just use the zip code and hit in stock. My local shops have nothing but 80 miles away one trek store seems to have everything they make
 

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I doubt Trek buys much from wholesalers.. they are one of the biggest bicycle companies in the planet and have already made their business vertical, by purchasing other companies like Bontrager; so they pretty much manufacture most of their bicycle components themselves.. including their own tires, rims, stems, seatposts, helmets, saddles, handlebars, etc. The only components i see Trek depending on other companies for, are groupsets / drivetrain, hubs, headset components.. so they are in a much better position than other companies who have to depend totally on wholesalers and other vendors / middlemen to put their bicycles together.
I could be wrong, but I don't think Trek makes a ton of anything themselves. Most frames are made by Merida (I think)...and lots of the Bonty stuff is contract stuff made by companies like Kenda, Fabric, and others.
 

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Here is a fascinating read about how Trek operates. I guess they are only vertical in name, and they depend on a lot of other companies.. which is pretty sad, because i own a Trek 5200, whose carbon frame was proudly made in the USA, and i am sure it was made in Trek's own factory.
Some companies have resisted the forces of globalism and still make some of their products in their country of origin, like Mavic.

Trek, by contrast, operates an insanely complex supply chain, with a single bicycle composed of parts — wheels, handlebars, shifters, brakes, grips, pedals, cables, housings, drive-trains, and more — from as many as 50 different suppliers. Those components are sent to one of four Trek assembly plants in China, Taiwan, Germany and Wisconsin, where the company’s high-end models are produced.
 

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Pizzaiolo Americano
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Here is a fascinating read about how Trek operates. I guess they are only vertical in name, and they depend on a lot of other companies.. which is pretty sad, because i own a Trek 5200, whose carbon frame was proudly made in the USA, and i am sure it was made in Trek's own factory.
Some companies have resisted the forces of globalism and still make some of their products in their country of origin, like Mavic.
There are very few bicycle manufacturing companies that have "resisted the forces of globalism" because it usually doesn't make sense to do so. Outsourcing means a quality product and in most circumstances, a much lower rate per piece. Mavic just went bankrupt BTW and they have been outsourcing to China for years so they can't be used as a viable example in this case...Even if a company makes their own frames in house and have their own in house components line (which are all almost exclusively manufactured in Asia anyway), they all still have to buy drivetrain components and there is a mess in that supply chain right now...Trek, like all companies, is doing what it can right now...
 

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Outsourcing means a quality product
i beg to differ on that one.
I ride pretty hard on a 20 year old 5200, made-in-the USA carbon frame, with almost 20 year-old, made-in-France, Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheels, having done over 20000 kms in the last two years, climbing and descending on paved and bad unpaved gravel roads, without any issues. Most of today's brand frames and components made in china are total garbage, made to be disposable, with poor quality control, In 20 years, most of today's bikes are going to be in the garbage landfill, because carbon fiber and epoxy cannot be recycled.
If you have any doubts, check out Hambini's YouTube channel, and the Luescher Teknik australian YT channel, where carbon frames and other components are cut up and analyzed.
As a personal example of "quality product", i purchased a pair of cheap brand-new, Mavic Cosmic Elite clincher wheels, one of the few models made in china, to replace my aging Ksyrium set (the brake tracks are wearing out). The rim size was so out-of-spec, i couldn't mount any of my tires, even using screw drivers. Even if i had gotten the tires mounted, it would have been impossible to change inner tubes on the road, in case of a flat. So i sold them.
Yep, another globalist "quality product"
I am pretty sure Mavic's bankrupcy has more to do with their idiotic business decisions (like phasing out all clincher rims, getting into the apparel biz, etc), bad quality control, bad product design, crap customer service (like not producing spoke replacements for older rims) than with not going "global". Needless to say, i am never buying another new Mavic rimset again, Luckily there are enough used Ksyrium Elite or SL sets from the early 2000s to keep me going, when the time comes.
The fact that a decades-old ksyrium USED wheelset sells for three times for what i paid for a BRAND NEW, made-in-china cosmic elite wheelset, should tell you about the quality of "oursourced" producs.
 

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Here is a pretty good article about Mavic's bankruptcy. The comments section is pretty telling about what went wrong with Mavic.

Anyone remember having Mavic rims back in the 70s and 80s? They never wore out. In recent years I have had new Open Pro rims built onto my winter bike every year.
But this isn't the reason why they have gone tits up. For a number of years they haven't given a **** about the customers. Quality has dropped, they have gone from completely redesigning their wheel sets every 5 years to every 3 years. What they have done in conjunction with this is.....chucked all the spares away, refusing to sell them to bike shops. Even if there are spares available, my LBS tells me that it is anyones guess when he orders them if they actually turn up. Every wheel set has a different spoke design, after three years you can't get spares so in Mavic world you just throw them in the bin, and buy some new ones!
Mavic's arrogance has been the undoing of their business. I personally would never buy factory built wheels anymore. The way forward is to buy hand built wheels. You can spec everything yourself, if you break a spoke the wheel builder can easily fix it. They are in most cases much lighter and more lively than fancy looking factory built ones. Unless you're speccing Enve rims with Chris King hubs, they don't admittedly look as sexy as factory built wheels but are far, far superior. If they are built by someone who knows their trade, you may never break a spoke. Paul Hewitt builds all of my wheels, in 25 years I have never had to return a wheel for repair. My last set of Mavics, some £1200 Ksyrium SLRs, were ****. Forever creaking in the spoke holes, the only way to quieten them was to spray them liberally before each ride with WD40. My wheels which I specced on my new winter bike are H Plus Son Hydra rims on Hope road hubs. Awesome wheels, very light and very stiff. And they look good too.
 

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another company, making quality products that has resisted globalism is DT Swiss (they have manufacturing plants in Poland, Switzerland and Taiwan). everyone knows their mtb hubs and spokes are probably the best you can buy (if you have the money)

 

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"I want what I want and I want it now!"

Take a breath, it's a bike.
We are still in a pandemic and just coming off the Country’s peak. There are food products I have not seen in a year at the stores. So many bikes that are available including lightly used machines that the owners fell out of love with. And in even may be an omen........if your listening.....
 

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We are still in a pandemic and just coming off the Country’s peak. There are food products I have not seen in a year at the stores. So many bikes that are available including lightly used machines that the owners fell out of love with. And it even may be an omen........if your listening.....
 

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i beg to differ on that one.
I ride pretty hard on a 20 year old 5200, made-in-the USA carbon frame, with almost 20 year-old, made-in-France, Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheels, having done over 20000 kms in the last two years, climbing and descending on paved and bad unpaved gravel roads, without any issues. Most of today's brand frames and components made in china are total garbage, made to be disposable, with poor quality control, In 20 years, most of today's bikes are going to be in the garbage landfill, because carbon fiber and epoxy cannot be recycled.
If you have any doubts, check out Hambini's YouTube channel, and the Luescher Teknik australian YT channel, where carbon frames and other components are cut up and analyzed.
As a personal example of "quality product", i purchased a pair of cheap brand-new, Mavic Cosmic Elite clincher wheels, one of the few models made in china, to replace my aging Ksyrium set (the brake tracks are wearing out). The rim size was so out-of-spec, i couldn't mount any of my tires, even using screw drivers. Even if i had gotten the tires mounted, it would have been impossible to change inner tubes on the road, in case of a flat. So i sold them.
Yep, another globalist "quality product"
I am pretty sure Mavic's bankrupcy has more to do with their idiotic business decisions (like phasing out all clincher rims, getting into the apparel biz, etc), bad quality control, bad product design, crap customer service (like not producing spoke replacements for older rims) than with not going "global". Needless to say, i am never buying another new Mavic rimset again, Luckily there are enough used Ksyrium Elite or SL sets from the early 2000s to keep me going, when the time comes.
The fact that a decades-old ksyrium USED wheelset sells for three times for what i paid for a BRAND NEW, made-in-china cosmic elite wheelset, should tell you about the quality of "oursourced" producs.
Anecdotal evidence is not evidence. Mavic is gone for several reasons. Globalism doesn't appear to be one of them. Most of your argument just highlights the fact that outsourced products have to have great QC, just like domestic products. The fact remains that the HUGE majority of bike parts are made in Asia these days and, just like domestically produced products, they are as good as a company's QC process. As far as carbon vs other materials, that discussion has been had a a million times over. I prefer steel myself but, carbon has its benefits as well. BTW, Hambini is a proven fraud so I take anything the Great Hambini says with a grain of salt...
 

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Anecdotal evidence is not evidence. Mavic is gone for several reasons. Globalism doesn't appear to be one of them. Most of your argument just highlights the fact that outsourced products have to have great QC, just like domestic products. The fact remains that the HUGE majority of bike parts are made in Asia these days and, just like domestically produced products, they are as good as a company's QC process. As far as carbon vs other materials, that discussion has been had a a million times over. I prefer steel myself but, carbon has its benefits as well. BTW, Hambini is a proven fraud so I take anything the Great Hambini says with a grain of salt...
Mavic's product quality decline is far from "anecdotal". It is a well know fact that some of their later freehubs had only one bearing with a plastic bushing, that used to wear out and cause the entire cassette to wobble and wear out. The engineering was so bad, that, today you can find bushing replacement bearing kits for Mavic freehubs on Ebay.
Very few companies (like Trek and Specialized for example) can afford to have western staff in chinese factories to maintain proper quality control, the rest have to rely on corrupt chinese employees for QC, and what you have is bad quality products.. like Cannondale's recalled fork problems.






So, if Cannondale, SRAM, Canyon and even Trek and Specialized had problems with the QC on their forks and other components, just imagine the quality control of lesser brands (as shown in Hambini's videos).
I doubt there is anything "anecdotal" about chinese sellers dumping hundreds of brand-new pairs of Mavic Cosmic rims on Ebay for $120. Since mavic rims are still unique in their manufacturing process, i seriously doubt they were fake.
I have compared my set to another set of originals, and they were identical, including the tiny barcodes in the rim.
Chances are, these rims were probably either out-of-spec, bad QC sets, that were taken out of the factory by corrupt chinese employees to be sold online, or discontinued sets that were dumped. Either way, what this faulty QC and control process did, was to harm Mavic reputation as a brand.. all thanks to "globalism"

PS. Hambini is a proven fraud? LOL
How is he a fraud? proven by whom? provide me with some links of some qualified engineers that prove his videos showing poor quality control and engineering are a "fraud"
I am an engineer myself, and i can call BS in a second..
 

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I'm sure someone has mentioned this, but it seems that the prices for the Trek bikes went up several hundred dollars. I usually browse their website every other week, and was shocked to see the Fuel Ex 8 listed for $3,799.99. Wasn't this bike listed for $3200-$3300 a few weeks back?
 

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I saw that the 2021 Top Fuel 9.8 GX went up from $5499.99 to $5999.99 in the last week, yikes! Waiting for the 2021 Fuel EX 9.8 GX to go up $500 as well. I am enjoying my 2020 Fuel Ex 9.7 though.
 

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Ouch @ at the price increases.. i have given up on getting a brand new Marlin, since the dealer here has no arrival dates for inventory.. i am looking at local used X-Caliber and used Scott Scale models
 

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I saw that the 2021 Top Fuel 9.8 GX went up from $5499.99 to $5999.99 in the last week, yikes! Waiting for the 2021 Fuel EX 9.8 GX to go up $500 as well. I am enjoying my 2020 Fuel Ex 9.7 though.
In australia latest prices:
Trek Fuel EX 8 GX alloy frame, Fox 34 fork - now 5000
vs...
Norco Optic C3 Deore Carbon frame, Rockshox Pike fork, now 5,300
 

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I have a little story about "globalism" and how it actually ends up hurting the companies that practice it. Where i live, there is only one chain of stores that officially sells Trek bikes.
The stores / company are called Bikehouse.

The company is out of stock of Trek Marlins, they have no date of arrival for new inventory.
I know because i check weekly with their vendor channel on whatsapp, as suggested by the guy at my local store.
Interestingly enough, on the local amazon clone here, called mercadolibre, there is a reputed seller with a BIG inventory of Trek Marlins 5s, but get this.. they resell them as just Trek Marlins with an "updated / complete" Shimano Altus groupset, at a very expensive price.. almost the price of a Marlin 7 here!!

I am pretty sure their inventory came directly from China.. so how come these guys were able to get a big inventory of Marlins 5, if the OFFICIAL channel can't get them?
The only explanation is, there is someone here, making deals directly with corrupt chinese middleman or even the factory, and buying entire containers full of Trek Marlin frames or partial assembled Marlins.
I am sure the contacts exist already, as the local Medellin bike brand GW, outsources / builds most of their bikes and products in china.

I doubt the company itself has any control over what is going on, as it always happens with companies that build stuff in china.
So in the end, people end up getting ripped off on mercadolibre (because these bikes are not worth what they are selling them for), and not from buying from bikehouse, hurting the official trek distributor here and the company itself.. as i doubt any warranty on these dubious Marlins will be honored by bikehouse / trek

 

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I have a little story about "globalism" and how it actually ends up hurting the companies that practice it. Where i live, there is only one chain of stores that officially sells Trek bikes.
The stores / company are called Bikehouse.

The company is out of stock of Trek Marlins, they have no date of arrival for new inventory.
I know because i check weekly with their vendor channel on whatsapp, as suggested by the guy at my local store.
Interestingly enough, on the local amazon clone here, called mercadolibre, there is a reputed seller with a BIG inventory of Trek Marlins 5s, but get this.. they resell them as just Trek Marlins with an "updated / complete" Shimano Altus groupset, at a very expensive price.. almost the price of a Marlin 7 here!!

I am pretty sure their inventory came directly from China.. so how come these guys were able to get a big inventory of Marlins 5, if the OFFICIAL channel can't get them?
The only explanation is, there is someone here, making deals directly with corrupt chinese middleman or even the factory, and buying entire containers full of Trek Marlin frames or partial assembled Marlins.
I am sure the contacts exist already, as the local Medellin bike brand GW, outsources / builds most of their bikes and products in china.

I doubt the company itself has any control over what is going on, as it always happens with companies that build stuff in china.
So in the end, people end up getting ripped off on mercadolibre (because these bikes are not worth what they are selling them for), and not from buying from bikehouse, hurting the official trek distributor here and the company itself.. as i doubt any warranty on these dubious Marlins will be honored by bikehouse / trek

Buy something that is available....
 

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Buy something that is available....
I will, i am tired of waiting and of dealing with scammers selling fake / stolen used Trek bikes.
i am going to buy a local branded bike, GW, to use the hydroformed frame as a building block.
The frame geometry is identical to a Trek Marlin. I am actually pretty sure, the GW frame weights less than the Marlin's, as it doesn't have the fancy downtube cable routing and rectangular chainstay tubes the Marlin has.
2021 - GW Jaguar 29.jpg
 

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I'm sure someone has mentioned this, but it seems that the prices for the Trek bikes went up several hundred dollars. I usually browse their website every other week, and was shocked to see the Fuel Ex 8 listed for $3,799.99. Wasn't this bike listed for $3200-$3300 a few weeks back?
Yes, I've noticed that although the Fuel EX8 had been at 3500 ever since I started looking, at least several months.. I guess that's one way to help build up stock and normally I'd say it's not that big of a deal but let's take a look at the price increases on the three (now 4) bikes I'm looking at:

Fuel EX8 GX/XT: 3500-3800 = 8.6 Percent increase

Spec Stumpjumper Comp: 4000-4200 = 5 Percent Increase
Spec Stumpjumper Expert: 4800 = No price increase

Giant Trance 29 3: 2250-2350 = 4.45 Percent increase

It's a bit galling to see a fatter than competitor mid-year price increase when there's been nothing to buy much less test ride for 6 months.
 
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