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I was looking for a tire that is light weight, in the 400 maybe 300 range, that is durable. II don't want to be changing tires too quickly. I need something that can ride well on hardpack, loose gravel, dry stuff basically. Help is appreciated.
 

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b12yan88 said:
I was looking for a tire that is light weight, in the 400 maybe 300 range, that is durable. II don't want to be changing tires too quickly. I need something that can ride well on hardpack, loose gravel, dry stuff basically. Help is appreciated.
Let's see... 300-400g, durable, good on hardpack and gravel...

...hmmm...

Wellllll...

None, You are dreaming. It does not exist.

There are tires in that weight range and good on hardpack. Add gravel and you are pushing it. Then add durable... You can't have it. Ultra lightweight and durable do not mix.

The closest may be the Conti Cross Country Pro 1.5 - 390g claimed with a full tread.
 

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b12yan88 said:
Hmm how about a light tire 400,300g that handles well on hardpack and dry stuff, and durability is not an issue.
Here are some sub 400g tires. All are designed as race tires (i.e. may only last a couple hundred miles) and mainly for hardpack use and are not the best when the terrain gets loose and/or rough. (all weights claimed)
  • Kenda Klimax Lite 1.95 (345g)
  • Kenda Kozmik Lite 1.75 (390)
  • Schwalbe Fast Fred 2.0 (350)
  • Conti Twister Supersonic 1.9 (370)
 

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Python Air Lite

b12yan88 said:
Hmm how about a light tire 400,300g that handles well on hardpack and dry stuff, and durability is not an issue.
The Python Air Lite is about 450g and is probably the best "light" tire for hardpack that you will find...

...but, you'll burn through them constantly. As the previous poster mentioned, there is NO such thing as a durable sub-500g tire. It just does not exist because the TPI (thread-per-inch) count has to be minimized to cut down weight...which cuts down the inherent strength and durability of the tire.

"Durable" XC tires can be had for 500-600g - Python Gold Elite (585g), Panaracer Fire XC 2.1 (580g), etc.

Unless you are racing short sprints and need every competitive advantage you can find, there is no reason to have a sub-500g tire on a bike. You'll not only spend a lot for the lighter tire, you'll burn through them 2x the frequency as a more durable tire.

Thx...Doug
 

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dgangi said:
The Python Air Lite is about 450g and is probably the best "light" tire for hardpack that you will find...
Actual weights are 480-490g

...there is NO such thing as a durable sub-500g tire. It just does not exist because the TPI (thread-per-inch) count has to be minimized to cut down weight...which cuts down the inherent strength and durability of the tire.
Thx...Doug
Light weight tires usually has high tpi counts. The smaller threads used make a thinner, more supple and lighter casing. The main weight loss is because of less rubber - in the casing and the tread - being used, and light rubber compounds than usually wear faster.

So, thinner, lighter casing; thinner rubber and less tread = lighter weight, less durable and more prone to cuts and punctures. The minimal tread also reduces traction on most surfaces.

Read my rant on semi-slicks: http://www.themudzone.com/tire/tire_site_files/rants/semi_slick.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, I guess ill listen to the Tire Man and stick with a heavier tire. Probably Fire xc pros since they are so cheap.

Do you have any tire recomendatons for using on road only?

and How about tubes, does slime really work ?


THANKS
 

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Pythons as an example

shiggy©®™ said:
Actual weights are 480-490g

Light weight tires usually has high tpi counts. The smaller threads used make a thinner, more supple and lighter casing. The main weight loss is because of less rubber - in the casing and the tread - being used, and light rubber compounds than usually wear faster.

So, thinner, lighter casing; thinner rubber and less tread = lighter weight, less durable and more prone to cuts and punctures. The minimal tread also reduces traction on most surfaces.

Read my rant on semi-slicks: http://www.themudzone.com/tire/tire_site_files/rants/semi_slick.html
You know more than I do about tires, so you are probably correct.

The example I was using about TPI differences was for the Python and Panaracer tires.

Python Air Lite = 60tpi
Python Gold Elite = 127tpi (+ 100g)

Panaracer Fire XC 1.8 = 60tpi
Panaracer Fire XC 2.1 = 127tpi

I see no benefit to the lighter versions whatsoever...unless you want to throw your money away.

Thx...Doug
 

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The Schwalbe Fast Fred 2.0 comes pretty close to what you want. If you're light enough to run these at low pressures and not bottom them out on the rims (28-33 psi) they have pretty amazing traction everywhere except loose gravel and they're way fast! The higher the pressure you run on these the less amazing they are.
 

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dgangi said:
...The example I was using about TPI differences was for the Python and Panaracer tires.

Python Air Lite = 60tpi
Python Gold Elite = 127tpi (+ 100g)

Panaracer Fire XC 1.8 = 60tpi
Panaracer Fire XC 2.1 = 127tpi

Thx...Doug
Afraid you are still misinformed.
  • The Python Air Light has a 127 tpi casing (and a low-density rubber)
  • Gold Elite; 127 and silica rubber
  • Both sizes of Fire XC Pros use 126 tpi casing with the folding bead and 66 tpi with the wire bead
 

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Well.....I would go for the Python Airlights

Everyone makes some great points, especially Shiggy. But, I ride pretty much the same terrain and have tried heavier tires w/ full knobbies to what I am using know (python airlights w/ Stan's). I will say that I have been running the same pythons on both my HT and duallie for about 5 months now riding both every week. And, I have come to the conclusion that it is the best all-around type riding for what I do. For example, I ride the about 2 miles to the single track from my house on the road. then, I hit some fireroads and singletrack mixed in a steady climb. Alot of the trails where are I live are like this. And, I will say that the pythons excel on about 80% of the trail. Sure, I could use a heavier tire for bombing downhill, but I like speed and control climbing and on the flats.

Regarding full knobbies having the best traction, I would have to argue it would depend on the terrain. I run a lower psi so that my tires conform to the terrain and really hook up well. This makes me more efficient because I do not slip( also feels like I added about an inch travel). And, if you do decide to go w/ the Pythons, go tubeless w/ Stan's and run the front tire in reverse. Both things will make you love riding the Pythons.
 
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