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What makes a clyde?

Im 6.3, 225#

Is it more of a racing category? I have not seen at the LBS a separate 'clyde' section.
Do manufacturers make different products for different weights,

The reason I ask, is Im fairly new to biking and have caught a little bit of the 'upgradeanitus' bug.

One of the area's Im looking into is a new front sus. fork.

Cheers :D
 

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Probably drunk right now
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A Clyde is a Big Fat Ass....

smiley said:
What makes a clyde?

Im 6.3, 225#

Is it more of a racing category? I have not seen at the LBS a separate 'clyde' section.
Do manufacturers make different products for different weights,

The reason I ask, is Im fairly new to biking and have caught a little bit of the 'upgradeanitus' bug.

One of the area's Im looking into is a new front sus. fork.

Cheers :D
You can take my word for it, or you can read through a couple of pages of discussion here:http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=10561

Do manufacturers make different products for different weights? Yes. For example, someone who is normal wears smaller clothes would typically wear a smaller jerseys. Those who wear larger clothes tend to wear bigger jerseys. Most fork and shock OEM's offer different packages based on rider weight. Some bikes cater to the larger rider.

A fork recommendation depends on the type of riding you plan on doing. For cross country riding, I'm a big fan of the Marzocchi Marathon fork.

Ken
 

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Clydesdale Warrior
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smiley said:
What makes a clyde?
Clydesdale was originally a racing class for those over 200lbs, but it has become a generic term for large (>200lb) MTB riders.

There are a few stores, and a few manufacturers that cater to large riders. For example: Supergo has a "Clydesdale" section, Kona makes the "Hoss" (a Clyde specific hardtail), and some clothing manufacturers make large and tall sizes.

Unfortunately few stores stock clydesdale specific gear, and most manufacturers engeneer their product (especially high performance products) to the stereotypical pro bike racer's height and weight...leaving us bigger and taller riders with less than ideal choices, especially if we want high performance products to race with. (though it has been getting better in recent years because of freeride and "all mountain" specific components that have come out recently, and even some of the new XC stuff has been getting more durrable)

This forum is useful for us big riders to discuss what products have worked for others with similar weights or heights and to find out what products have failed for other clydes. (and the list is long!)

Welcome to the forum Smiley, hope it is useful for you.

sh0rty :p
 

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MTB Rider
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3,007 Posts
Yes, but ....

Ken in KC said:
You can take my word for it, or you can read through a couple of pages of discussion here:http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=10561

Do manufacturers make different products for different weights? Yes. For example, someone who is normal wears smaller clothes would typically wear a smaller jerseys. Those who wear larger clothes tend to wear bigger jerseys. Most fork and shock OEM's offer different packages based on rider weight. Some bikes cater to the larger rider.

A fork recommendation depends on the type of riding you plan on doing. For cross country riding, I'm a big fan of the Marzocchi Marathon fork.

Ken
Bike manufacturers don't make their components more "solid" to match frame size. Bikes are almost all specd to be as light (or cheap) as possible. Somehow durability takes a backseat.
 

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200lbs

sh0rty said:
Clydesdale was originally a racing class for those over 200lbs, but it has become a generic term for large (>200lb) MTB riders.

There are a few stores, and a few manufacturers that cater to large riders. For example: Supergo has a "Clydesdale" section, Kona makes the "Hoss" (a Clyde specific hardtail), and some clothing manufacturers make large and tall sizes.

Unfortunately few stores stock clydesdale specific gear, and most manufacturers engeneer their product (especially high performance products) to the stereotypical pro bike racer's height and weight...leaving us bigger and taller riders with less than ideal choices, especially if we want high performance products to race with. (though it has been getting better in recent years because of freeride and "all mountain" specific components that have come out recently, and even some of the new XC stuff has been getting more durrable)

This forum is useful for us big riders to discuss what products have worked for others with similar weights or heights and to find out what products have failed for other clydes. (and the list is long!)

Welcome to the forum Smiley, hope it is useful for you.

sh0rty :p
A clyde is 200lbs or more. Historically bikes have been designed around the average weight of a rider which is around 165lbs. Obviously this is very light and the clydes were left out of the loop. Bike frames and parts have improved tremendoulsy as far as durability and strength over the last few years. With the advent of "freeriding" a clyde can now out fit his bike with stronger beefy parts for improved durability. The newer all-mountain bikes are very durable. Examples would be the Santa Cruz heckler, Jamis XLT, Fisher Cake, Trek Liquid, Kona Dawg, Cannondale Jekyl and Gemini.
 

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fun things are fun
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200lbs is that with or with out equipment because right now i'm 6'1 and 197 when i where all my equipment i'm at 200 give or take a couple ounces
or am i a mini clyde because all i know is that when i read that people put about 30 to 40 pounds of air in a tire i gasp especially when they say to put it 45 to be on the safe side.
a small drop would pinch my tires on landing if i ran that low.
 
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