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Where did Chuck Bicycle go?

I saw them in every bike magazines in late 90’s for couple of years,
but all the sudden it just disappeared.

Do you know whatever happened to the company?

Chiro
 

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Chiro said:
Where did Chuck Bicycle go?

I saw them in every bike magazines in late 90's for couple of years,
but all the sudden it just disappeared.

Do you know whatever happened to the company?

Chiro
I wanna say that the guy who owned Chuck went on to start Push Industries. But don't quote me on that as I may be confusing him with someone else.
 

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Chuck bikes

Darren from Push did indeed run Chuck. Not certain whether he owned or managed, but he was the key player.
Towards the end of Chuck's lifespan as a bike company, Darren was also running a shock company, which escapes me right now.
Only a guess, but some of the reasons that led to the demise of Chuck include, really pricey frames (really nice but really expensive), not the greatest customer service (ordered my bike with the promise of several weeks which turned into 12 weeks, always with the promise of next week...), and a slew of frame breakages.

The frames, or my frame at least was welded by John Fry (a motorcycle welder) and just at the cusp of Chuck going out of business (thereby negating my advertised 100 year warranty--that's right, not lifetime, but 100 year!?), my rear seatstay broke at the disc tab weld. John Fry warrantied it, though not after having the frame for an entire summer and complaining bitterly about not get paid for all the warranty work he'd done. I also managed to pick up a few rear derail hangers before they went belly up.

I honestly can say that I've loved my Chuck which I've had since '98. Its not the lightest, and doesn't get the claimed travel of 4.5" (probably closer to 3.75), but its been one of my favorite rides and the bike I've owned the longest. I've come close to selling it, but just can't bring myself to part with it.

I will admit that owning a bike and having spent a good deal of money on the frame (though I did get it employee purchase, but still it was in the 1200-1300 range) only to have the company fold is somewhat irritating. Some of the old reviews here on MTBR had reviewers pissed at Darren because just before Chuck closed shop he was alledgedly still selling frames to buyers who had no idea that the company would be gone within a couple of months. Caveat Emptor, I suppose, but still, every one raves about Push and what cool bike or fork Darren and the Push riders are using, but it still digs a little to think of anyone who might've dropped 2 grand on a frame and have it break and basically be out of luck. Back then I debated between a Turner and the Chuck, but at the time Turner flat out told me a month, and Chuck quoted two weeks, and I was in a rush (and waited 12 weeks anyway). But it all works out, as I've still got the Chuck and now I've got a Turner as well.

Currently the Chuck CF-FS hangs in my basement, not being ridden, mostly built but not properly. Over the summer I plan on a full restoration, putting my Manitou Super back on it (which was on the bike for several years and the red matches the frame nicely) as well as my hed/zip wheels.

The Chuck and the Burner ride amazingly similar, with the Chuck being slightly more supple due to the coil shock and the bearings, which make for a smoother rear end than any suspension bike I've ever felt (including the turner). With the shock removed you can cycle through suspension with your pinky and the most minimum of pressure. But Turner got it right with bushings as I grease the bushings once or twice a month during wet weather riding, takes 5 or 10 minutes, but the Chuck I would replace the bearings every couple of month, which cost more money and took more time. They last fine during dry weather, but the water kills even the best quality bearings.

The turner is lighter, but the Chuck probably has 8 times as many welds (not really a good thing). The frame, after all, is made entirely in two halves, including the chain and seatstays, and then welded together. An old article about the Chuck mentioned the actual distance of welds, tho' I don't recall it now.

Here's some pics.
The first is how I used to have the bike set up.
The rest are just putting on whatever extra parts I happen to have kicking around.
 

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Stop taunting me with those pictures....

neveride said:
Darren from Push did indeed run Chuck. Not certain whether he owned or managed, but he was the key player.
Towards the end of Chuck's lifespan as a bike company, Darren was also running a shock company, which escapes me right now.
Only a guess, but some of the reasons that led to the demise of Chuck include, really pricey frames (really nice but really expensive), not the greatest customer service (ordered my bike with the promise of several weeks which turned into 12 weeks, always with the promise of next week...), and a slew of frame breakages.

The frames, or my frame at least was welded by John Fry (a motorcycle welder) and just at the cusp of Chuck going out of business (thereby negating my advertised 100 year warranty--that's right, not lifetime, but 100 year!?), my rear seatstay broke at the disc tab weld. John Fry warrantied it, though not after having the frame for an entire summer and complaining bitterly about not get paid for all the warranty work he'd done. I also managed to pick up a few rear derail hangers before they went belly up.

I honestly can say that I've loved my Chuck which I've had since '98. Its not the lightest, and doesn't get the claimed travel of 4.5" (probably closer to 3.75), but its been one of my favorite rides and the bike I've owned the longest. I've come close to selling it, but just can't bring myself to part with it.

I will admit that owning a bike and having spent a good deal of money on the frame (though I did get it employee purchase, but still it was in the 1200-1300 range) only to have the company fold is somewhat irritating. Some of the old reviews here on MTBR had reviewers pissed at Darren because just before Chuck closed shop he was alledgedly still selling frames to buyers who had no idea that the company would be gone within a couple of months. Caveat Emptor, I suppose, but still, every one raves about Push and what cool bike or fork Darren and the Push riders are using, but it still digs a little to think of anyone who might've dropped 2 grand on a frame and have it break and basically be out of luck. Back then I debated between a Turner and the Chuck, but at the time Turner flat out told me a month, and Chuck quoted two weeks, and I was in a rush (and waited 12 weeks anyway). But it all works out, as I've still got the Chuck and now I've got a Turner as well.

Currently the Chuck CF-FS hangs in my basement, not being ridden, mostly built but not properly. Over the summer I plan on a full restoration, putting my Manitou Super back on it (which was on the bike for several years and the red matches the frame nicely) as well as my hed/zip wheels.

The Chuck and the Burner ride amazingly similar, with the Chuck being slightly more supple due to the coil shock and the bearings, which make for a smoother rear end than any suspension bike I've ever felt (including the turner). With the shock removed you can cycle through suspension with your pinky and the most minimum of pressure. But Turner got it right with bushings as I grease the bushings once or twice a month during wet weather riding, takes 5 or 10 minutes, but the Chuck I would replace the bearings every couple of month, which cost more money and took more time. They last fine during dry weather, but the water kills even the best quality bearings.

The turner is lighter, but the Chuck probably has 8 times as many welds (not really a good thing). The frame, after all, is made entirely in two halves, including the chain and seatstays, and then welded together. An old article about the Chuck mentioned the actual distance of welds, tho' I don't recall it now.

Here's some pics.
The first is how I used to have the bike set up.
The rest are just putting on whatever extra parts I happen to have kicking around.
It's torture! stop taunting me with pictures of your CHUCK. :D

REEK
 
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