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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well i just purchased a new bike. Its a Cannondale Super V700. I don't know what year or too much about the bike other than it its pretty fun in the rocky wooded trails around my house in PA. Anyway can i get a little bio on this bike? I really don't know what years they were made from, or what they offered. I've read the headshock could be a concern. Might look into upgrading that eventually. Right now i am looking at Disc brakes and a locking rear shock. And tips, tricks or this bike specific info would be great. I attached a picture of the bike to go along with this post. Thanks in advance for the info
 

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IMO Ride it for all its worth. Put tires ,tubes, grips,cables, stem if needed , then upgrade the whole bike when you got the money to buy disk brake equiped dual suspension. A wheel plus disc upgrade is 1/2 way to a modern ride. The suspension action of current tech is much smoother in the rough ,better in pedal bob and stiffer rear triangles.
 

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Penn State said:
Well i just purchased a new bike. Its a Cannondale Super V700. I don't know what year or too much about the bike other than it its pretty fun in the rocky wooded trails around my house in PA. Anyway can i get a little bio on this bike? I really don't know what years they were made from, or what they offered. I've read the headshock could be a concern. Might look into upgrading that eventually. Right now i am looking at Disc brakes and a locking rear shock. And tips, tricks or this bike specific info would be great. I attached a picture of the bike to go along with this post. Thanks in advance for the info
I had an XL 1998 Super V. It was great fun downhill or on the level. Long climbs could be a bit of a chore. I did have to have the headshok repaired once due to rusting inside. Mine was not disc brake compatible.

Perhaps it was due to the long stem of the XL size but I always found that it felt a bit slow in the handling department. There are days that I wish I still had it ...it was a comfortable ride for me. :)
 

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It's hard to tell but buy the looks of the picture I would say your bike is not disc compatable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
damion said:
There are no IS tabs on the fork or the rear triangle.
Are you sure about that... i think i see what appears to be a mounting tab on botht he rear and the front. This is what led me to believe that i could get discs. Of the people i've ridden with, none of them have commented that my bike isn't compatible, when i've mentioned it. Perhaps the picture doesn't clearly show this area. I'll get the camera out and take a snap shot of it... or if someone could link me to a pic of what the tabs do look like so i can compare, it would be much appreciated.
 

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Penn State said:
Are you sure about that... i think i see what appears to be a mounting tab on botht he rear and the front. This is what led me to believe that i could get discs. Of the people i've ridden with, none of them have commented that my bike isn't compatible, when i've mentioned it. Perhaps the picture doesn't clearly show this area. I'll get the camera out and take a snap shot of it... or if someone could link me to a pic of what the tabs do look like so i can compare, it would be much appreciated.
How about posting better pics of your bike so we can see the tabs.
 

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Headshoks are kinda cool, in that they separate steering and suspension to some degree. Also, "suspesion twist", where the fork legs move different amounts, twisting the wheel out of plane, is not really an issue with a headshok. Regular rebuilds are neccessary, as with any suspension fork, but please note that the rubber boot on a headshok is not cosmetic. If it gets ripped, dirt and crud will work their way up into the open bottom of the head tube, wreaking havoc with the guts of the fork.

Super-Vs have a well deserved reputation for cracking. They typically break at one of the "strut" tube welds. The seatpost is at the end of a long lever, the upper "V tube", and exerts great force on the thin strut tubes, leading to cracks at the ends. Check your frame regularly, and if you see a crack, don't ride the bike. Cracks in aluminum spread very fast, often resulting in sudden, total failure.

With those caveats, they're good bikes. Keep up on the maintainence, check for cracks often, and ride it until it dies. Don't put much money into it, upgrade-wise. When the rear end develops play in the bushings and pivot points, the frame is toast. Parts are no longer made, and very hard to find.

Keep the rubber side down,

--Shannon
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I inspected further, compared w/ a buddies bike, and no i don't have disc brake tabs. Well it looks like this is going to be a good beginner bike to start out on and overtime i'll end up getting something newer. THanks for all the help
 
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