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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
a) Does the max tension for a rim mean no single spoke should have a tension greater than the max?

b) Does the max tension for a rim mean the average tension of all the drive side spokes should be less than or equal to the max tension?

c) Does the max tension for a rim mean the average tension for all the spokes should not be greater than the max tension. For example, if the max tension for your rim is 125 kgF, does that mean the drive side spokes can average out to 135 kgF while the non drive side spokes can average out to 115 kgF?

Thanks.
 
G

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a) Does the max tension for a rim mean no single spoke should have a tension greater than the max?

b) Does the max tension for a rim mean the average tension of all the drive side spokes should be less than or equal to the max tension?

c) Does the max tension for a rim mean the average tension for all the spokes should not be greater than the max tension. For example, if the max tension for your rim is 125 kgF, does that mean the drive side spokes can average out to 135 kgF while the non drive side spokes can average out to 115 kgF?

Thanks.
all the above!! i kid i kid...:winker:
 

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I lean more towards A but see no harm in B.

I find i am fine as long as my lowest spoke tension is above 80-85 kfg to prevent them from unwinding. That means sometimes i have to go over the 100 kfg max Stans puts on some of their rims on the drive side.
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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Answer is "A". Do not go above the maximum tension specification for any single spoke.

Max spoke tension is often more than needed or practical for a solid wheel build. I have corresponded with many pro wheel builders about my rims. They tell me that there is no significant stiffness to be gained by using more than about 125KgF on the higher tensioned side. But I still tension my Derby Rims to 135KgF for my own mental reasons! :)

Also check if your spokes and hubs have a maximum tension, and don't go above the lowest tension spec of all the components of your wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was going to build up some Stan's Flow EX rims with DT Swiss Competition spokes and Hadley hubs. Flow EX rims are rated to 125 kgF, but I can't find the max spoke tension for DT Comp spokes nor Hadley hubs.
 

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Your hubs and spokes will be fine, I would probably bring them to about 120 kgf on the drive side. The tensions between spokes should be very consistent if it's built right so unless the rim is bent there's really no worry of a stray spoke exceeding the limit. Let the off side tensions fall where they may, but be sure they don't vary much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I read somewhere that once you mount a tire and inflate it, the tension of the wheel will drop. Is that more for road wheels? If not, how much does the tension drop for an mtb wheel once a tire is mounted and inflated? Should I try and anticipate that drop by going over the max rim tension?
 

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Chris Bling
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I read somewhere that once you mount a tire and inflate it, the tension of the wheel will drop. Is that more for road wheels? If not, how much does the tension drop for an mtb wheel once a tire is mounted and inflated? Should I try and anticipate that drop by going over the max rim tension?
This is true for the lighter Mountain rims as well.

What I do is bring the wheel upto about 100kgf and then mount a tire and inflate it to 45 psi. One some of the light rims like the WTB KOM's, you will go from 20 on the Park scale down to about 15 or 16. Once I let it sit for a few minutes, I deflate the tire, remove it and then finish building the rim up to the 120 kgf mark.

When the rim 'crushes' the rim (for the most part) it does so evenly around the rim. However, I have seen the dish change after mounting and unmounting the tire. For this reason, i always throw on the tire when there is still time to easily correct the dish.
 
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