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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last week I was on my Dakar on the dirt for the first time in a long time. About half a mile from the trail head I see the most beautiful bike I've seen in a long time- a brand new Specialized S-Works, full suspension. The rider is kneeling next to it. When I get up to him he asks if I've got any hex wrenches- part of his disk brake system has come loose and its hitting the spokes of the gorgeous wheels- he can't ride. I have my multi-tool in my pocket and give it to him. A minute later his bike is fixed. I talk to the guy for a bit and find out he's not new to cycling. He's a roadie who just bought his first mountain bike, so it's not like he doesn't know bikes break down. I don't mention that I'm surprised he doesn't have tools with him, but I am. It's late in the day, the sun is setting, and he was going to have a long walk in cycling shoes carrying a bike in the dark if I didn't come along.
I don't want this to be a thread about the rich guy who isn't prepared being made fun of by the poor guy on a bike that cost a quarter what his did, though I do feel a bit smug :) The question is what do you carry? This is what I take-

1) Multi-tool, includes chain tool and tire levers

2) Spare tube, patch kit, CO2 inflator with 4 cartridges, tire boot and tire levers

3) Two full water bottles, more if I'm planning a long one

4) Energy gel

5) Chain link

6) Fiber-fix replacement spoke

7) Emergency blanket (in case everything else on the list fails)

8) GPS, compass, and normally a printed map

9) Backup headlight battery if I'm going on a dusk/night ride

10) Cell phone

What do you take?
 

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Spare tube, patch kit, pump, camel back, first aid kit, multi tool, chain tool, camera (if I remember), Ipod, $5 in case I have the wrong tube (this did happen before, grabbed tube for cannondale while riding my trek :madman: )
 

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Don't forget...

Photocopy of Drivers License and Medical Insurance cards any medical info if needed and a ICE (In case of emergency) contact name and phone #.

Hopefully this is something you will never need but it weighs nothing and can be a life saver.
 

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Kmoodymz3, that is a great idea I really should start, just in case. I do usually remember to tell the wife where and for how long, but that won't help if someone finds me laying there. I think I'm going to get a roadID. I've seen them in the mags, if you haven't seen the ad go to www.roadid.com.
 

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7am Backcountry ;- )
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Camelbak water pouch 2 litre.
Topeak allen tool.
Puncture repair kit.
Tyre levers.
Pump.
Lucazade carton.
Waterproof jacket.
Egg Mayo Sarnie!
 

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California L33 said:
He's a roadie who just bought his first mountain bike, so it's not like he doesn't know bikes break down.
I also don't want to turn this into a roadie bashing thread, as I ride both and love both styles of riding.

But I can say that your comparison is not apples to apples. I have about 5k miles on my road bike, have only had one flat and no other mechanicals. Not to mention, I'm on the road so I can either call my wife to pick me or hitch a ride home.

In contrast I've replaced disc pads, replaced derailure cables, dealt with self extracting (at the wrong time) crank bolts, blown sidewalls, broken spokes, bent wheels, broken seat posts, broken seat rails, shattered derailures and many many many other problems, whilst deep in the woods. I'm racking my brain right now, but I don't think I've ever had to walk out of the woods. (Had some unpleasant rides out, but was always able to get 'er rolling enough to take the direct route out.)

So if he's a roadie, and just new to MTB I could understand not knowing the full extent of what can go wrong. Mountain bikes take a real beating and road bikes don't.

That said, I go prepared on either bike. I then to WAY overpack if I'm riding solo in the woods though. If riding alone in the evening I even carry more water than I'd ever need, and extra layers. You just never know. I have a big pack, and the more I carry in it, the better the excercise is, right?:D

Anyway, hopefully the guy learned a lesson and will be prepared next time. It's a wonderful sport, but you have to prepare for a lot of different scenarios.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
bmateo said:
I also don't want to turn this into a roadie bashing thread, as I ride both and love both styles of riding.

But I can say that your comparison is not apples to apples. I have about 5k miles on my road bike, have only had one flat and no other mechanicals. Not to mention, I'm on the road so I can either call my wife to pick me or hitch a ride home.

In contrast I've replaced disc pads, replaced derailure cables, dealt with self extracting (at the wrong time) crank bolts, blown sidewalls, broken spokes, bent wheels, broken seat posts, broken seat rails, shattered derailures and many many many other problems, whilst deep in the woods. I'm racking my brain right now, but I don't think I've ever had to walk out of the woods. (Had some unpleasant rides out, but was always able to get 'er rolling enough to take the direct route out.)

So if he's a roadie, and just new to MTB I could understand not knowing the full extent of what can go wrong. Mountain bikes take a real beating and road bikes don't.

That said, I go prepared on either bike. I then to WAY overpack if I'm riding solo in the woods though. If riding alone in the evening I even carry more water than I'd ever need, and extra layers. You just never know. I have a big pack, and the more I carry in it, the better the excercise is, right?:D

Anyway, hopefully the guy learned a lesson and will be prepared next time. It's a wonderful sport, but you have to prepare for a lot of different scenarios.
Extra layers are a great idea, and as someone else mentioned ID and insurance cards.

Last year I rode a whole lot more on my road bike than my mountain bike. I take a bit less on the roadie, but still-

-water and gel (amount varies with planned ride)

-multi-tool

-spare tube, inflator, patch kit (I was stranded once when I ended up with one dead CO2 cart, and one 16g cart for my 12g only inflator :madman: )

-fiber fix spoke (I was also stranded on the roadie once due to a broken spoke :madmax: )

-cell phone

-GPS

-$20 in aero bag. (Never saw the need on the MTB, as there aren't many places to spend it :))

You have 5K on your roadie and one flat! Are you riding rollers indoors or what? Sometimes I think both the roads and trails around here are paved with puncturevine. I was getting so many flats I had to switch to Armadillos (both road and mountain).
 

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One thing I don't bring with me is a copy of the map that I leave on the windshield of my car with my planned route highlighted in red. I do this when I ride alone. Yes, I have the GPS and cellphone with me but they don't always work. I've helped on some searchs and know that a few clues could make a difference.
 

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it really depends on where and when I'm riding.

if I'm riding at the in-town, 7+ mile loop that's always crowded and right in the middle of civilization, I pretty much take the bare minimum: me, bike, extra tube, tire levers, pump, water/gatorade. this kind of riding really doesn't require anything extra beyond that. If I break down, I'm not that far away from the car where my tools are or I can rely on the kindness of others.

The longer, further from the home front rides usually means standard operating gear (i.e. pretty much stuff already listed.) I still try to pack as light as possible. I really hate having a fully loaded down pack on my back. I do, however, try to bring a camera on most rides for those kodak moments.
 
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