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This question has probably been asked by all the rookies, apologize if it irrates some, but hey last time I was on an mtb was 9 years ago riding a 26er with inner tubes! My "new" (to me) bike is a 27er running tubeless. So the question is, do I really need to carry an inner tube as a backup? Or could i get away with carrying those rubber plugs and a hand pump? What about small 2oz sealant bottle?

Almost all my rides are at the local nature preserve park, but it's still a big park, but it's not out in the boonies either. I'm thinking, rubber plugs and a hand pump is enough to limp back to the car? I'd hate to have to carry an entire inner tube because those suckers are heavy.

Statistically, I mean how often do people actually get a flat on a 2.3" tubeless tire that weighs something like close to 900 grams!?

Thoughts?
 

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22 Fuel EX8
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I'm in the same boat as you. Just getting back into it after 10 plus years off. My new bike came set up with tubeless and I honestly can't see looking back. I carry a oneup pump amd that thing is a beast. Might as well be a floor pump in my opinion. Works great. I also carry a lightweight 29" tube and tire levers although maybe that will change as I get more confortable with my tubeless set up. Im also going to order a tubeless plug kit. That should pretty much have me covered.
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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I'm just going to leave this classic right here…

 

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Bacon + tool, CO2, light tube, tire levers.
The bacon is in the crank. The rest fit in a neat frame pack that straps to the top tube.

Sometimes a pump if I ride with a backpack, which I can't remember when was the last time.
 

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Cell phone is all i carry. Sometimes you have to fake some pretty severe symptoms, but if you play it right, mountain rescue will come and carry both you and your bike out.
If you have really good control of your body you can generate symptoms that will cause
Them to call a helicopter.
 

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off to ride
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Had I had bacon and co2 last week, I’d have been back on the Trails. The one time I didn’t bring anything with me, something got me and I had to call for a ride. but, I’m actually I didn’t have bacon on me, because it forced me to go buy the bacon kit and learn to use it at home, which I had to learn a little about. The small puncture required two bits, but I also was able to watch a few videos and figure out that shoe goo was another great add on for the outside.

Had as had my spare kit/bag, I’d had a mess and used a tube to fix. Now….I’m better because of it….at least that’s what I tell myself!
 

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A salad fork
A dinner fork
A butter knife
A water glass
A soup spoon
A dinner knife
A fork for eating pickled bass

An oyster fork, dessert spoon
A napkin and a finger bowl
A dinner spoon, a salad knife
A bread plate for your dinner roll


Real answer: darts, pump, sealant, valve tool. I have been carrying an 8oz OS bottle, just because I have it already, and my last two flats have been due to letting the sealant go dry and might as well fill 'er up when that happens. Goal is to completely avoid breaking the bead unless tire damage is too great for darts. Add levers, a tube, and a tire patch for a longer more remote ride where consequence of going without would be more than an inconvenient hike or a careful tire-ruining pedal out. No patch kit - any further flats on the tube can also be handled with sealant.

I recently tried to set up a Gravelking on a WTB rim and had a hell of a time, it made me think twice about this. I was glad I tried it in the driveway. But still - the flat that ruined the prior tire would have been no problem if I'd had the above stuff with me in my laptop bag. Instead I rode home on it, destroying the tire and taking an extra half hour out of my life. Which is not the end of the world, it's just a tire and extra half an hour of daycare, but it was inconvenient.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Tube, small hand pump, cut-down automotive plugs and tool (I find the bacon ones are too small for some cuts), a few patches and some glue, presta adapter. This doesn't take up as much space as it sounds, but I like to be prepared on the longer rides and not have to walk out.
 

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Came across a guy today that had a puncture, he was getting ready to put a tube in. Asked if he had tried a bacon strip, said he never heard of them. I plugged his tire, then we found the wheel seam was leaking air. He said thanks anyways and at least he learned something new.

I carry a tube, bacon strips, and a CO2 on my bike. Perfect for the quick morning rides during the week. If I go for a longer ride, I carry my Camelbak with more CO2 and a pump sometimes.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Oh yeah, and a little micro-toe-nail clipper. I find that any excess with the strips can pull out in rough terrain, where rocks pinch the threads and pull on the strip. So I use the little micro toe-nail clipper to trim the excess, far better at it than anything else I've tried.
 
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Bacon+tool, high volume pump, spare valve+tool, tire boot, tube, tube patch, levers.
It sounds like too much but at different times I needed each of those things.
Likewise my medkit has lots of things I (or my company) needed at different times.
Plus other stuff like wipes, tape, tiny knife, zip ties, hanger, toolset,…
The list of everything is pretty large but combined weight is still dominated by water anyway, so I don’t mind.
 

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I'm riding a gravel bike pretty much 100% on tarmac, right now. My ride to campus is about 20 miles round trip, 3 times a week.

Here's what I carry.

Tube (700x31-47C) (fits both my and my daughter's tires)
Zip-ties x3
Patch Kit (VP-1)
Tire patch (TB-2)
Multi-Tool
Quick-link (not shown, its in the multi-tool)
Tire levers x3
Cleaning cloth for glasses or phone
$20
Frame pump*
House Key**

*not strictly in the saddle bag, but part of the overall package.
** the red tag is very helpful if the key falls out, it gives me a chance to find it.

These are things that life has taught me to carry. At some point in my riding life, I've needed every one of these items. My phone lives in a Quad-lock case attached to my handlebar. My wallet in the back pocket of my bibs, and my apple watch is on my arm. Lately I've been carrying a face mask (pandemic reasons). I use one water bottle for rides over 15 minutes, and 2 for rides over two hours.

Bag Font Office supplies Material property Wallet
 
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