Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Dr Gadget is IN
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is continuing my thought about control feedback. I would like to know how wide your Hbars are. The wider the bar, the less force needed - but the faster you have to move. Having a 29er slows the response down a bit, but a wide bar would push it back towards 26er territory.

So the Q's are:
1) How wide is your 29er handlebar? (grip width)
2) How wide is/was your 26 handlebar?

I run a 590mm flat bar with barends - so the actual grip width is 550 on both bikes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48,238 Posts
wadester said:
This is continuing my thought about control feedback. I would like to know how wide your Hbars are. The wider the bar, the less force needed - but the faster you have to move. Having a 29er slows the response down a bit, but a wide bar would push it back towards 26er territory.

So the Q's are:
1) How wide is your 29er handlebar? (grip width)
2) How wide is/was your 26 handlebar?

I run a 590mm flat bar with barends - so the actual grip width is 550 on both bikes.
"...but a wide bar would push it back towards 26er territory."
Using your own reasoning, you have this backwards. The narrower bar would make the response "quicker", same hand movement = more steering movement.

That said, I use the same bars for most of my bikes regardless of wheel size or type.
 

·
Recovering couch patato
Joined
·
14,019 Posts
As I changed my attitude about bikes from "following the pack" to "deciding for my own" I've been using wider bars. Going 29" was obviously part of the same change of mindset. I've seen people win big races on 29"ers with silly(to me) narrow handlebars. 29" is not a set of handicaps to overcome, it's a different bike.
To me, stock flat bars under 600mm wide have totally lost their appeal to me. I'm pretty sure somewhere along the line one of our pioneers came up with such a bar, it seemed to work for him, and now billions of that kind have been made over the years, while the optimum bar shape is probably much closer to an On-One Midge or Mary bar, at least for XC.
When I SS, I like leverage. 700mm+ Jones H-Bar for me. With gears, 625mm and 11º minimum, plus cork grips that add a bit of width plus a nice bar edge. My road-mtb handlebars are now 620mm 38º.
I'm not the world's skinniest rider, but also not a powerlifting broad shouldered type.
I liek the wide bars regardless of frame geometry, long/short TT/stem or the other way around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
following the pack, OT

Cloxxki:With all due respect, I feel there is something fundamentally wrong with your set up as seen in many pictures. Check http://www.cyclefitcentre.com/pdf final docs/backyard positioning_julu_aug_2004.pdf
for some good info. Everyone wants to believe they are "special" but your set up just looks awkward to me.
Just the test, that in racing position (roadbike in the drops) you should be able to take your hands off the bars and not slide forward/backward, is very revealing. I read that if you are balanced that way, your energy expenditure for all your postural muscles is less. And so you safe energy to go fast. Makes sense to me. Sorry for the off topic.

Cloxxki said:
As I changed my attitude about bikes from "following the pack" to "deciding for my own" I've been using wider bars. Going 29" was obviously part of the same change of mindset. I've seen people win big races on 29"ers with silly(to me) narrow handlebars. 29" is not a set of handicaps to overcome, it's a different bike.
To me, stock flat bars under 600mm wide have totally lost their appeal to me. I'm pretty sure somewhere along the line one of our pioneers came up with such a bar, it seemed to work for him, and now billions of that kind have been made over the years, while the optimum bar shape is probably much closer to an On-One Midge or Mary bar, at least for XC.
When I SS, I like leverage. 700mm+ Jones H-Bar for me. With gears, 625mm and 11º minimum, plus cork grips that add a bit of width plus a nice bar edge. My road-mtb handlebars are now 620mm 38º.
I'm not the world's skinniest rider, but also not a powerlifting broad shouldered type.
I liek the wide bars regardless of frame geometry, long/short TT/stem or the other way around.
 

·
Recovering couch patato
Joined
·
14,019 Posts
Roadie document, nuff said.
I believe more in uniqueness of millions of riders than "the right way to set up a bike" on paper, to work for everyone.

Back on topic : after becoming a lazy pedaler that could only function in a very narrow cadence band, I looked at singlespeeding for guid...punishment, and found that the best gearbox is man itself. Wide handlebars, to a point, make me feel more comfortable at speed on downhills, and allow me to place quick attacks without need to shift back. Goes for road and mtb btw.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48,238 Posts
mvi said:
Cloxxki:With all due respect, I feel there is something fundamentally wrong with your set up as seen in many pictures. Check http://www.cyclefitcentre.com/pdf final docs/backyard positioning_julu_aug_2004.pdf
for some good info. Everyone wants to believe they are "special" but your set up just looks awkward to me.
Just the test, that in racing position (roadbike in the drops) you should be able to take your hands off the bars and not slide forward/backward, is very revealing. I read that if you are balanced that way, your energy expenditure for all your postural muscles is less. And so you safe energy to go fast. Makes sense to me. Sorry for the off topic.
This is the important part (and sub-head) of that article:
"If you're felling uncomfortable on the bike and want to change your position..."

Is far as I know Cloxxki is not and does not.

The pics I have seen of him on a bike show that his position (hip, back, arm angles) look pretty normal. The bike alone does look extreme.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
26 inches +

Wadester I'd recommend some wider bars for SS whichever size wheel. In addition to more leverage when you stand to climb you'll have a lot more control going downhill.
I run riser bars between 26 and 27 inches on both little and big wheeled bikes and I can't picture going any shorter.
Although I'd like to try the Jones H-bar someday..........
 

·
Recovering couch patato
Joined
·
14,019 Posts
Seat tilt is what allows me to run the bars as low as I have to for my riding. If I'd have to use the tilt used on most other people's bike, level or (roadie style, no-one knows why) tilted way back over, I would not be able to raise my bars high enough. I just checked, and it makes a 6" difference in position. Needless to say, my seat points down, even a bit for seats with relief zone.
My setup (tip down) actually solves many people's back aches and more personal comfort problems. Could save some people's sperm count as well I'm sure.
Roadies won't ever understand. They think in unwritten rules of thumb, and write them down as hard truth. Seat are supposed to be lever or hanging back over, and belong on a setback stem sticking 4" above the frame. Puke. Incredible with so much misinformation and disastrous bike setup, cycling still exists, and thrives.

Sorry, caffeine trip. It's been long since my last serial cokes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
26.75" hi-rise bars. I don't worry about turning that much quicker but I like the stability of a wide bar for flying down a rough trail. If I need to get more aerodynamic for a fast section I just put my hands in the middle and crouch over to hammer and fly.
 

·
Dr Gadget is IN
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Interesting

Not quite what I asked for, but good info. I tried wider bars, but more leverage took away the force balance and required much faster response on my part. This is like any lever - the longer it is the less effort it takes to operate, but the farther you must move it.

A friend of mine bought a new bike a while back. It had fashionable wide riser bars. Every time he got into a tricky section he would overcontrol and had quite a few spectacular crashes. I loaned him one of my "narrow" flat bars, and tho he thought I was wacko he was desperate. It put him back in control, so he bought the bar and still rides with it.

Handlebar leverage is a balance between force (effort) and motion. I find that my personal vibe works much better at a higher force/lower motion level. Moving to a 29er - but using the same bar - requires even less movement, but more power. I asked this question because I read everyone else liking wide bars, especially SSer's - which seemed to defeat one of the things I really like about the 29er..

Cloxxkie - I like your comment about setting up your ride to fit your own standard rather than following fashion. I am doing the same, but in a different direction. YMMV.
 

·
being is
Joined
·
286 Posts
wide

I'm up to 710mm (28") bars now and anything narrower feels wrong. Wide bars give huge control advantages and lots of leverage for climbing. Forget about that steering speed mumbo jumbo. A shorter stem speeds up steering more anyway.

Try the w--i--d--e bars.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top