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Your killing my Strava
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Not that I would go out and ride in a monsoon but what kind damage if any is there to the bike? Stuff like drive train shifters brakes etc? How many of you ride in somewhat muddy conditions
 

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muddy conditions are fun. most people dont like them so it makes the trail more clear to ride. the only thing i dont like is my sb8 kick mud all over me. Its all up on my face and I end up eating mud lol. Just make sure you get a good clean and wipe down on the bike after a ride. You dont want the mud to harden and cake in which will make it more difficult to clean off later.
 

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local trails rider
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Obviously, all the mud and grit is going to increase wear, so do get the bike cleaned and lubed after you ride. Some people would never get to ride if they waited for dry conditions. I really dislike all the post-ride cleanup, which makes me pretty picky about when and where I ride.

One thing to consider is possible trail damage in wet conditions. In some areas it is a non-issue. In many places riding in the wet is a serious no-no. Better find out about that locally.
 

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Will travel to ride!
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I wish I had a mud riding problem! Our local mt bike association basically rules over the public trails in our area. The leadership and a small number of the membership go MENTAL when you ride the trails in muddy conditions. Their rule is if you can see your tire tread imprinting the wet ground, then it's probably too wet to ride... which is at least half the year. I (kinda) get the erosion concern, etc. But what about trail armoring? Granted, they built the trails - but they built them on publicly-owned/funded land (county, state and local parks). And the association is non-profit, volunteer based, collects annual fees for membership and is business sponsored. I don't understand why they don't invest some of those collected dues and sponsorship funding into trail armoring? I think they made the effort once or twice and it worked out pretty well. A little more effort and we can ride even when it's wet!

They don't publish a balance sheet/ledger and I only know of three places they put money into: building some big TTFs on one segment of one trail (that only a small percentage can physically ride), partial funding of a camping trip (which they still collect additional dues for), and sponsorship of one local race. Where's the rest of the money going? So I don't belong to it and am trying to get support to start a spin-off association to build new trails to keep open all-year.
 

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ride in the rain

I prefer wet and sloppy than dry - somehow even the ordinary trail is more fun when you have to work to get traction and you come home dripping with water and dirt. If the bike is really muddy, I wash it off. The brake discs usually get wiped off even I don't wash the bike.
 

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BikePSU:

Your local trail organization is a bit on the harsh side, don't you think? If they base trail worthiness on tread prints, then you will never ride off road save for drought conditions. I'm all for stewardship and following the rules, but even I consider this to be a bit over the top.

They need to establish some sense of reasonable wear, and not an impossible standard to uphold.

It is for that reason that many bikers intentionally defy such mandates. The rebellious aspect of our sport, you could say. Annoying but accurate.
 

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I understand why people get pissed when other people ride wet trails. I get pissed too when people muck up the work I've done. I don't know what it's like everywhere, but the trails in my area are maintained by a handful of people. There isn't a huge work force or a bunch of money floating around for trail work, and awesome trails don't magically appear or stay maintained by themselves.
 

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Like i've probably mentioned before, I ride in Scotland, if you don't ride in the rain, you don't do much riding.

There are no biking trails as such, any little path you find in the wilderness is fair game and used by all, and bits that do get churned up by biking usually get some rocks or branches thrown in to help you skip over it, and in fairness to bikers, these parts of woodland paths are usually non passable anyway and walkers also benefit from the stepping stones.

As for the original point, my bike does take a beating because of the weather here,I ride across streams too and quite often find the crossing deep enough to reach my hubs, my BB must get soaked on every ride, I wash off mud and grit/sand with either a bucket of water or a light spray from a hose.

If I get on the bike next ride and something creaks it gets dismantled and greased up, if it doesn't I keep on riding.

Truth is, setting mud and dirt aside, my bike runs like a dream in the wet, so smooth and so quiet.:thumbsup:
 

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I live on Whidbey Island i Washington, and the rain really got to me this year, unlike others. The destruction and havoc it does to ones drivetrain makes bike shops happy up here, I know since I used to be a wrench at one. Commuters (daily allyears types) have it even worse in my opinion. The road grit adds up fast, taking out chainrings and such PDQ.

Also I like dry riding, and as such am visiting NE Oregon currently. The riding here is GREAT! Dry, dry, dry, sigh.............
 

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Will travel to ride!
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BikePSU:

Your local trail organization is a bit on the harsh side, don't you think? If they base trail worthiness on tread prints, then you will never ride off road save for drought conditions. I'm all for stewardship and following the rules, but even I consider this to be a bit over the top.

They need to establish some sense of reasonable wear, and not an impossible standard to uphold.

It is for that reason that many bikers intentionally defy such mandates. The rebellious aspect of our sport, you could say. Annoying but accurate.
The rebellious thing struck my punk rock nerve! :D Ahh... I'm a little too grown up for that.

Yeah, I thought they were a little out of touch, too. There's a bunch of us that don't get it. We have no interest in destroying a trail, but you gotta ride some of the time without feeling like a criminal. I do my best not to exasperate the problem. I just figured an annual fee collecting/business sponsored org with a decently sized volunteer base would focus more on increasing the number of ridable days with some trail armoring versus building man-made/wooden TTFs. I grew up riding motoX and had to build plenty of trails back up. Small time/effort investment, huge dividends. Why not? I've ridden all up and down the coast and there are plenty of amazing trails that get ridden in wet conditions. Maybe the parks are getting a kickback...
 

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Just Ride
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I'll be getting a new bike first of the year. Most likely by February. I'll be damned if I'm gonna wait for it to dry up before hitting the trails on my brand new steed! Though I think the clay soil here in northern Indiana would be ok for wet riding? Some sticky mud in areas where you'd sink in the tires, but for the most part the trails seem to be ok after a good rain, or in this case melting snow. Though, I'll have to test it when the time comes. I've not gotten on the trails after a rain, but I have gone hiking in the same areas and those trails weren't to slippery. Maybe I'm wrong.
 

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I ride in very wet conditions and follow some rules: Try and ride a bike with larger sealed pivot bearing at all frame points (assuming you're riding a FS), wash your bike after EVERY ride; clean your fork often; change your chain every two to three months; and get good fenders.

Or just ride a rigid SS and forget it.
 

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Give it a crank
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Riding in the rain is way too fun to miss out on, it's more demanding of the bike and the rider. It can do more damage to bike components than riding in dry conditions, requiring extra maintenance afterwards.

Water will get into the frame and end up in the bottom bracket, you can drain some of it through the seat tube by just pulling out the seat post and turning the bike upside down. More water gets into the rims through the spoke nipple holes. I once found water inside the fork lowers too. All part of the fun, do it!
 

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I nearly always ride in the wet because many of the tracks here in Sydney AU happen to go through creeks and valleys. I tend to ride in wet sand most of the time which does wear out many of the parts... However, I'd say that most of the bearing damage would come from forcing water into where the bearings are. So I'd avoid things like high pressure hoses and transporting the bike on the freeway on your roofracks in the rain. that said, if I never did this, I'd never get anywhere either...
 

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I'll be getting a new bike first of the year. Most likely by February. I'll be damned if I'm gonna wait for it to dry up before hitting the trails on my brand new steed! Though I think the clay soil here in northern Indiana would be ok for wet riding? Some sticky mud in areas where you'd sink in the tires, but for the most part the trails seem to be ok after a good rain, or in this case melting snow. Though, I'll have to test it when the time comes. I've not gotten on the trails after a rain, but I have gone hiking in the same areas and those trails weren't to slippery. Maybe I'm wrong.
Clay soil is actually one of the soil types you should avoid when it's wet. Some terrains drain really well and don't erode quite as much when it's rainy and well-constructed trails will dry out faster than poorly constructed one. You probably get bad freeze-thaw in the winter as well, which can also be very destructive to the trails.

Some complaint about trail stewards and mountain bike clubs is legit and some is not. I know in my area, some people don't understand what goes on behind the scenes. Some people don't know better. Some like to whine and do nothing. Some just don't give a %#@$. None of these people are doing the work or taking into consideration what is best for mountain biking in the region. Sometimes you have to make compromises (like not riding when it's wet and building more sustainable trail) to get what you really want.
 

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Just Ride
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Clay soil is actually one of the soil types you should avoid when it's wet. Some terrains drain really well and don't erode quite as much when it's rainy and well-constructed trails will dry out faster than poorly constructed one. You probably get bad freeze-thaw in the winter as well, which can also be very destructive to the trails.

Some complaint about trail stewards and mountain bike clubs is legit and some is not. I know in my area, some people don't understand what goes on behind the scenes. Some people don't know better. Some like to whine and do nothing. Some just don't give a %#@$. None of these people are doing the work or taking into consideration what is best for mountain biking in the region. Sometimes you have to make compromises (like not riding when it's wet and building more sustainable trail) to get what you really want.
Good to note. Thanks!

Like I said, I've not ridden the trails when wet. They do dry pretty quickly though, as I could already tell they are well made. Guess It'll be a test of patience then come the first of the year.
 

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namagomi
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Riding in the wet(not soaking wet) is probably fine so long as the type of soil you're riding on isn't the type which is susceptible to pooling... i'm thinking clay here. The last thing you want are more puddles during the dry season.

Chain, pulley, bearings and brake caliper... mud can get in anywhere!

Ride hard, but don't put it away wet and your components will last longer.
 

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Delirious Tuck
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Be smart! The anti-mtb folks love to point fingers at bike tracks through mud and many parks have rules dictating that riders aren't allowed out w/in 24 hour of rain (or have rules/agreements with local MTB groups that give access with conditions).

Many other trails users don't care that we're there, however there is another, loud and powerful, group that doesn't want us out there and will do what they can to remove us. If your area has rules/ettiquete or guidleins please get to know them and respect them (do ask why though!). We all like the challenges that different weather creates in our sport, but be smart and don't push, especially if someone who knows what's going on asks you not to.

Regarding armoring or eliminating wet spots - in New England armoring a trail properly takes hours of back breaking labor, I figure with a 6 man crew I can get 10' properly armored/hour with rock resources immediately available, where we have to scout/quarry/import rock or other raw materials from over 100 yards from the site that number is cut by 25-50%. Re-routing takes time, and boardwalks cost a boatload (like $20-$25 a linear foot for proper/lasting quality).
 
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