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Wahoo!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on trusting my tires however I feel as if my front is going to wash out on fast turns. I end up either overshooting the turn or going entirely too slow. I'm not racing or trying to ride over my head, I just want to be able to flow with the trail using as much momentum as possible. BTW, I'm running my Mythos at 40 lbs. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Also, I've heard that using your back brake in a turn has a tendency to stand you up. Is that true? I try to judge how much speed I need to carry me through a turn and brake early and accelerate through the apex. This is correct, isn't it? Thanks in advance.
 

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MTBR Mafia
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what are your conditions, are you riding xc or dh trails? rocky or smooth? banked or flat? if you specify, it will be easier to help you
 

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ok that helps. first you probably want to let a few psi from your tires. second, if they have good side wall traction, lean your bike into the turn like the moto gp guys except to a lesser degree. i tend to be fairly centered when cornering but if my front starts to loose traction then i will get on the rear brake and lean forward. My best avice would be to try different positions and brake use and use whatever one works best for you.
 

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Tire pressure makes a HUGE difference.

I second the tire pressure! I have my front tire between 15 and 20 psi. (I weigh 175lbs and the tires are Hutchinson Python Airlights, 2.0)

I was feeling that same way. I just started riding alot this year and I had my tires at 40psi from the start. When I dropped them down to the 20's I was shocked. It was like a breakthrough. At 40 they bounce and slip all over everything.

I also noticed that if I keep some weight on the front wheel it doesn't float as much. I tend to want to stay back because I fear going over the bars. Stem length also contributes to how your weight is distributed. I tried a shorter stem on my bike because the reach was a little on the long side. The front wheel washed out more with the shorter stem.

Good luck!
 

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grumpstumper said:
I second the tire pressure! I have my front tire between 15 and 20 psi. (I weigh 175lbs and the tires are Hutchinson Python Airlights, 2.0)

I was feeling that same way. I just started riding alot this year and I had my tires at 40psi from the start. When I dropped them down to the 20's I was shocked. It was like a breakthrough. At 40 they bounce and slip all over everything.
Good luck!
That's cool and all, but I'm sure they aren't rated to that pressure so don't know how long the side walls will last. Most tires are rated somewhere aroung 30-40 PSI as their low pressure setting, however there are a few tires made to run lower pressures.

riding corners is just like you would on a dirt bike, you need body-english - move you weight about the bike as need to help with traction and turning. I find I ease forward a bit on the sadle when corninering tight corners and if you watch a dirt bike rider/racer you'll see they do the same - move up over the gas tank - to help give the front wheel some traction and let the rear be lighter and come around. To take corners faster you have to learn as cdub said to lay your bike down to assist in your cornering. MOtocycles and bicycles are not different just they have angine power to help bring the rear around/accelerate if they need it, other than that the physics apply to both forms of two wheeling.
 

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Also, make sure that your outside crank arm is at 6 o'clock. Placing all of your foot pressure on the outside crank will help both front and rear from washing out. As you sweep from one turn to the next, either pedal or backpedal to alternate foot positions. Before long, it will be habit and you wont have to think about it.
 

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Wahoo!
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies. I'm definately going to drop pressure in my front tire and start working on the lean angle of my bike. As far as my stem length, I'm running a 110 stem. Thanks again!
 

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Chip's advice is the best...

ChipAllen said:
Also, make sure that your outside crank arm is at 6 o'clock. Placing all of your foot pressure on the outside crank will help both front and rear from washing out. As you sweep from one turn to the next, either pedal or backpedal to alternate foot positions. Before long, it will be habit and you wont have to think about it.
Tire pressure will only help if your technique is good. A slight clarification:

Not just foot pressure on your 6 o'clock pedal. Shift your weight at your hips to place most of your weight on this pedal. Point your inside knee (the knee that has no weight on it) in the direction you want to go coming out of the turn.

Look through the turn to the place you want to wind up with your head and chest over the front of your bike (this adds weight to your front end and makes it more stable).

No brakes. Your braking should be done before the turn. If anything, you should be prepared to pedal (accelerate) out of the turn.

Square off the turn. Think NASCAR here. Get as far as you're able to the outside of the trail. You should try and hit the turn at its apex as close to the inside of the turn as possible. You should exit the turn on the outside once again. Just like they do in NASCAR. Start high, turn low, finish high.

Ken
 

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Don't worry, be happy!
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I give up. I've been trying to google a certain kind of image. I had this cornering discussion a long time ago with a good buddy, and we ended up looking at pics of a motorcycle racer, a bike racer and a skier all corner at high speeds. The physical similarities are incredible in terms of where the body mass is placed, the relationship of the hip and shoulder, and the angulation involved.

and whaddya know... I gave it one more try just now, using different keywords ( angulation in cornering) and I got a great PSIA article relating high speed cornering in mountain biking, road cycling and skiing:
ta-da https://www.psia.org/psia_2002/education/TPSArticles/teaching/tpsspring94carvingbike.asp

So they are roadies, get over it as the technique is essentially the same with the exception of maybe keeping pedals at 3/9 so you don't clip things if there are rocks around.




Also, Ned Overend covers it pretty well.
 
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