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Weight is always a big discussion. Especially for 29ers. The question that I have always had but never heard an educated opinion on is this. Is 5 pounds on the bike the same as 5 pounds on the gut? I see guys going on and on about a few ounces while their love handles are barely contained in their spandex. From a performance standpoint is spending 300 bucks to trim a few hundred grams off a bike really better than just laying of the mayo? I, myself, am not as trim as I could be and therefore have never taken weight on the bike overly seriously. I buy quality mid level stuff and don't sweat it. Am I missing something?
 

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Why not both?

Anyway, I think the location of that weight on the bike plays a big factor. A pound of weight in the saddle, seatpost, stem, brakes, etc doesn't have nearly the same effect as a pound of weight lost in the rims and tires (which would have a huge effect on acceleration)
 

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meh....
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Weight matters, no matter where it is. Sure rotating weight is most noticeable when removed, but would you rather push a 30 lb or a 25 lb bike up a steep hike-a-bike?

Would you like to have lost that 5 lb-10 lb before you started up that steep hike-a-bike?

Monte
 

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more beers, lees gears.
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both is always nice.

I ride a 27lb jabberwocky. Its light enough to keep me from whining about its weight. Im sure if I rode a 32+ hardtail I would be whining about the bike loosing weight first.
 

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I was into weight weenie stuff for awhile, more so because it was a fun challange and interesting. As time has past i find that as i replace parts they are for durability and stability.
My ride is several pounds heavier now. That said it's way more stable in the turns and i have way more confidence in really pushing the bike to it's limits. Thus for me the bike is faster............I think it's a fine balance.
I'm not a small guy, so if i lost, say, 10 to 15 lbs, that would make a huge difference compaired to any bike part. I could also see if you weigh a buck twenty and have nowhere to go but to buy a set of carbon rims to drop weight!!!!!
 

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Beware the Blackbuck!
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Weight lost off the bike is more noticeable while riding your bike, you feel it more easily. Weight lost off the wheels is even more easily noticed because not only are you moving those grams forward (like the rest of the bike), you're also rotating them around in a circle with every pedal stroke.

I'm not trying to say that you shouldn't lose weight, and you should shoot for the lightest weight components. I agree with theheavyone, durability with intended use in mind is more important to me.

A last point is, talking about what new badass part to buy is a lot more exciting than talking about your new diet plan. At least on a MTB forum.
 

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A 200 lb rider who replaces his 32 lb bike with a 25 lb bike has decreased the total of the rider plus bike by 3%.
I think the performance gain would be awfully disappointing for what it costs.
Another thing, at least for hardtails, a heavier bike has more mass and will ride better on rough ground.
It is the maximum irony to spend a ton of money to lose 7 pounds on a hardtail only to find that the bike rides worse than before.
3% is not enough to make it climb materially better but 7 pounds is enough to ruin the ride going downhill.
 

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more beers, lees gears.
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ShadowsCast said:
Talking about what new badass part to buy is a lot more exciting than talking about your new diet plan. At least on a MTB forum.
No way dude. My new abs will be amazing. I'll post pics when they come in.
 

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GeoKrpan said:
A 200 lb rider who replaces his 32 lb bike with a 25 lb bike has decreased the total of the rider plus bike by 3%.
I think the performance gain would be awfully disappointing for what it costs.
Another thing, at least for hardtails, a heavier bike has more mass and will ride better on rough ground.
It is the maximum irony to spend a ton of money to lose 7 pounds on a hardtail only to find that the bike rides worse than before.
3% is not enough to make it climb materially better but 7 pounds is enough to ruin the ride going downhill.
???

i assume you are refering to pushing the bike downhill. otherwise your logic will not apply.
 

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orangedog said:
My bike is rocking at 35 lbs. Its a tank through the technical stuff...

I started riding at 315lbs. I'm now at 275lbs. My bike now weighs -5lbs. :D
**** yes. :thumbsup:

It's easier to spend money to make your bike lighter than ride harder and eat less to make yourself better.
 

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Fat boys,
Think about it in terms of strength to weight ratio. I have seen clydes faster than skinny riders and skinny riders faster than clydes. It's all in the ratio.

If you weigh over 200lbs you actually need a 30lbs+ bike. So forget about the whole "light bike" BS. You need stiffnes and that does require weight in some parts.

Also, how strong your core is, has more relevance than paying $250 for Sram xo deraileur at 197g vs $69 for X9 at 230g.

Another way to loose weight is running, but if you do not like to run, then get a middle of the road road bike and get some milage that way....

When I started mountain biking i was 220lbs ten years ago. It was the most painful sport/hobby I ever tried. Of course I could play golf, right? Now I am 175lbs. I am 6'2" so there is no upgrade that I could buy to save 45lbs on off my bike.
 

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Weight of a bike is way over rated. I am about to take my Pugsley with camping gear through soft sand for the next few days. Geeez I guess I won't be having any fun now!

Now if most people who ride weight weenie bikes were to figure out how much their big guts weighed along with their stuffed to the gill camelbacks, helmets and clothing and shoes, they would be in for a real shock.

I guess the only consolation is that if you take a pound off your bike it stays off, but if you take a pound off your gut it creeps back on at the next party.
 

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Let's say we have two riders.

Rider A, and Rider B. They're identical twins. More or less carbon copies of each other, genetically.

They have the same bike, and weigh the same amount (both people, and bikes). 30lbs of bike beneath a 200lb man.

Rider A loses 10lbs from the bike. Rider B loses 10lbs from his body, through riding alone (no dieting for him).

I'd wager that the increase in endurance, strength and efficiency that Rider B receives as a result of his hard work will result in better times around the local XC loop.
 

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I don't know what kind of weight matters more. I weigh 140lbs and my 29er weighs almlost 30lbs. Its a pain but when I get on my road bike I feel like a rocket. Its sort of like using one of those bat weights when you are on deck.

In the long run I'm positive that people are better off losing weight and saving money. If I was fat I wouldn't really want the lightest parts I could find, that seems dangerous.
 

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Personally, I don't think there is anything "Weight Weenie" about XTR or X.0. Same with Ritchey aluminum stems, 355 rims or Thomson posts.

Sure, they're light, but they're also designed to get one hell of a pounding from the world's best racers, and keep on ticking.

When you start getting into carbon stems, ultralight carbon cranks, or aluminum cassettes, yeah, you're risking some pretty nasty failures, should something go wrong.
 

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Zion Rasta said:
Fat boys,
Think about it in terms of strength to weight ratio. I have seen clydes faster than skinny riders and skinny riders faster than clydes. It's all in the ratio.

If you weigh over 200lbs you actually need a 30lbs+ bike. So forget about the whole "light bike" BS. You need stiffnes and that does require weight in some parts.

Also, how strong your core is, has more relevance than paying $250 for Sram xo deraileur at 197g vs $69 for X9 at 230g.

Another way to loose weight is running, but if you do not like to run, then get a middle of the road road bike and get some milage that way....

When I started mountain biking i was 220lbs ten years ago. It was the most painful sport/hobby I ever tried. Of course I could play golf, right? Now I am 175lbs. I am 6'2" so there is no upgrade that I could buy to save 45lbs on off my bike.
You hit the key. It's all about the P/W ratio. Training the strength (power) to produce the most power one is genetically capable of producing will often have heavier riders doing better than equally trained lighter riders who simply cannot produce enough power to keep up because they are genetically "less gifted" than the heavier rider - and vice versa. It works in both directions. Producing the power to move your weight up the hill is much more important than the weight of the bike. Now if one is talking about high level XC professional racing - well the training and genetic talent is a given. There is no more power gains to be made and no more weight loss on the body to occur - and they are all riding "light" bikes.

Here's what the Weight Weenie FAQ says about a light bike?

6. Why not shed some weight of my body rather then the bike?
Loosing weight is a good thing if you need to (ie Over weight), but loosing weight off a bike is great for several reasons:

* Bike feels more responsive
* Bike becomes more nimble
* Rotational weight is reduced which can be beneficial to acceleration
* Bike is easier to get up climbs etc (Why burn energy riding a heavy bike up a hill?
 
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