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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK some sputters and delays but our site is up! Some of you may have to refresh your browser to see the site or wait till your server updates. Pricing and Geometry will be up later this week. Those on the mailing list I will send a .pdf file with our new brochure that has pricing and geometry on it.

We will see you at Sea Otter and thank you for your generous offer 2 Mellow for allowing us to put our bikes in your booth!!! Now you all know where to find us!! We are also sponsoring a racer! More info on that later......
 

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Niner Bikes said:
OK some sputters and delays but our site is up! Some of you may have to refresh your browser to see the site or wait till your server updates. Pricing and Geometry will be up later this week. Those on the mailing list I will send a .pdf file with our new brochure that has pricing and geometry on it.

We will see you at Sea Otter and thank you for your generous offer 2 Mellow for allowing us to put our bikes in your booth!!! Now you all know where to find us!! We are also sponsoring a racer! More info on that later......
Got any pricing?
 

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Nice website, great pricing.

Quick summary the way I understand it from the newsletter PDF :

Frame $749
Extra Juicy 7 brakes $250
Extra Reba Poplock $324
Extra AM Classic SS disc-only wheelset $200
sortof, each combo of the above, as long as including the frame, gets a special total price.

I'm saddened by the geometry chart though.
Sizes start at 15.5", 23.1" TT, which is cool.
Each size upwards gains around 3/4" of TT extra, just like most mtbikes on earth, nothing out of the ordinairy, decade long track record for that.
With all the bikes I know, normally riders are 4" taller per size.
That's 2" of leg length.

Niners add 1" of seattube per size, so the taller the rider, the harder he'll need that 410mm seatpost, with each larger size the seapost will be exposed on average an inch more.

I decided I'll never buy a bike much lower than 21.5", and with most companies I'm fine with their XL, both in seat tube as well as top tube.
Niner's XL is 18.5", saving a whopping 50g or so over a 21.5", had they used conventional 2" steps per size.
To get a 410mm seatpost to work (21.5" seat tube), I'd need a XXXXL Niner, but it'd have a 27.5" top tube, forcing me to turn around my stem to reach back.

Strange, to fit this bike, you need to be short, like the guys that designed it, or tall with shortish legs. Max inseam that'll safely work with the XL is around 36-36,5". Maxing out a 410mm Thomson, putting quite a bit of stress on the frame. Yes that's long legs, but nothing like my 39", and that's not as rare as it seems. 3 riding buddies of mine have the identical proportions, 2 of them SSers who are sine recently into 29" bling.

No Niner for us. TOO BAD, I'd love to get those brakes and wheels.

My verdict : great brand idea, great concept, gorgeous frame, great pricing system, but not a frame that'll fit everyone. 1" increments, why not make the S an 12.5" then, M 14.5", L 16.5" and XL 18.5"? That would take away the standover issue especially for those that are likely to care, the S riders. Ever seen an XL rider on a 21" with standover issues? I haven't.

I feel like a freak now, my dreambikes largest size is 3 sizes too small for me :-(
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Niner Bikes

Cloxxki,

I appreciate your input on frame sizing. We have a couple of reasons for using the shorter seat tube.

One is modern posts are much stronger than before. We have spoken to Easton and they have no problem with someone 250 lbs with max insertion on their carbon posts. Thomson is the same way.

Our tubes are Scandium and is specifically butted to insure strength at the seat tube.

A shorter seat tube gives you a more compact geometry so you get a stiffer bottom bracket that single speeders want.

A lower top tube allows more knee room when you are swaying a bike side to side climbing.

There is also subtle psychological confidence factor knowing you have plenty of room in a "get off"

If you add:

180 mm crank
470 mm seat tube
360 mm post (410 Thomson post inserted min 50mm)
50 mm rail to seat
1060 mm total or 41.73 inches of "inseam reach"

I understand not all riders like the look of a lot of post showing and hey that's ok. We made the bike to perform as best as possible. I value your feedback and thank you for your honest opinion.
 

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I'd love to see how you over-extend a Thomson on an XL, and try to fit a 41.7" inseam rider on it. The equasion doesn't add up that way. With my 39", I more than max out the Thomson with 180's on a 21".

I won't discuss the esthetics of long seatpost extension, it does look sporty, although the kids pointing fingers does get really old really soon. I know, been maxing out seatpost for most of my life... The pointing changed into silent but admiring "wow that's big bike" gasps when I turned KM (23.4" effectively).

I'm not convinced yet. Why 1" frame size increments? I don't see the realtionship between that and the length of a seatpost. You've created a system where short riders get fewer of the much-wanted standover clearance than large riders, who don't really need it that bad. Small riders are only so disadvantaged with standover issues in general because of identical BB height on all sizes of frames.
The S and M sizes probably will suffice with a 330mm or even 250mm seaposts most of the time, while L and XL customers will really be maxing their 410's out, and liekly also returning frames as they simply won't fit. I can't understand why you'd want to play it that way. And the (vital, I'll admit) weight saved in the frame goes to the seatpost anyway. 5g per 1cm of Scandium vs. 5g per 1cm of Thomson?

With your 1" between frame sizes, a hypothetical XXL 19.5" would fit practically no-one between 6'2 and 6'8" because of obvious lack of seat tube, and an XS 14.5" would be on the tall side, with standover clearance issues and only 250mm of seatpost required.
Does Easton say the same about their Scandium tubing, and 250lb riders with 350mm seatpost extension?

One more Q. did I miss it, or can we also get our advised Thomson through you?

Niner Bikes said:
Cloxxki,

I appreciate your input on frame sizing. We have a couple of reasons for using the shorter seat tube.

One is modern posts are much stronger than before. We have spoken to Easton and they have no problem with someone 250 lbs with max insertion on their carbon posts. Thomson is the same way.

Our tubes are Scandium and is specifically butted to insure strength at the seat tube.

A shorter seat tube gives you a more compact geometry so you get a stiffer bottom bracket that single speeders want.

A lower top tube allows more knee room when you are swaying a bike side to side climbing.

There is also subtle psychological confidence factor knowing you have plenty of room in a "get off"

If you add:

180 mm crank
470 mm seat tube
360 mm post
50 mm rail to seat
1060 mm total or 41.73 inches of "inseam reach"

I understand not all riders like the look of a lot of post showing and hey that's ok. We made the bike to perform as best as possible. I value your feedback and thank you for your honest opinion.
 

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Recovering Weight Weenie
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Your points are valid Cloxxi...but..on the bright side (although not for you or me) it seems the Niner will fill the nitche at the other end of the spectrum opposite the KM w/ it's tall seatube.
My Vulture has a 20.5" ST and I'm already maxing out my Thomson almost... and 18.5" ST is completely out of the question for me. That said...and now this I'll say, with a jealous tone...that it's an incredibly sweet looking and performing ride.
But yes, perhaps for round 2, we can convince them to give the L and XL (and maybe an XXL in the future) some extra seat tube.... than we can ride too! :D
 

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Big riders...

29ers really rock for larger riders. In fact, some of us just do not feel comfortable on 26" wheeled bike.

That being said, if you are making 29ers and (taking the moniker "9er") why not make bikes that fit larger riders well? Smaller riders will want 26" wheels for "performance reasons" anyway.
 

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us made?

Hey,
I am interested in building a 29er for my next bike.
Who/where are your frames fabricated?
Do you build in house or are you subing them out to an established builder?
If so is it a US builder?
Thanks.
The frames do look very nice.
 
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