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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got $650 to spend, im pretty obese and need to do something to get some exercise. Would probably prefer a mountain bike or something super sturdy.

Trust me, I'm not going to be mountain biking down mount everest any time soon, or making some insane jumps across any canyons, gorges, or other things where wheels leave the ground.

Any suggestions?

I ordered a Diamondback Response, but both the original and replacement, the left crankarm stripped out putting the pedal in, so would like to avoid that model of bike.

Thanks for your time! It's much appreciated.
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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Are you going to trail ride? Or mostly paths? Asphalt?

What exactly is "pretty obese"?

If you're going to ride bike paths, you might be better off getting a $650 hybrid rather than a $650 mountain bike.
 

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turtles make me hot
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ALL bikes have left and right threads in their cranksets so you don't unscrew the pedal as you ride. Make sure you can thread the pedal in by hand before you take a tool to it.
How much do you weigh? I only ask so I can rule out suspension forks or 28 spoke wheels and such.
 

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Rogue Exterminator
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Yeah, a Response probably isn't going to be the right bike for you.

I would suggest going to your local bike shops and see what they have to offer.
$650 won't get you anything high end but it will get you a decent bike to start your journey.

Congratulations on making the decision to make a positive change in your life.
A good friend of mine used to be 325 lbs and has lost 125 lbs of it with the help of cycling. He did it on rocky rooty mountain trails on a mid 90's full rigid Giant Recon. He now does 70-80 mile races and completes them. Last year upgraded to a full suspension SC Tallboy.
 

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I've got $650 to spend, im pretty obese and need to do something to get some exercise. Would probably prefer a mountain bike or something super sturdy.

Trust me, I'm not going to be mountain biking down mount everest any time soon, or making some insane jumps across any canyons, gorges, or other things where wheels leave the ground.

Any suggestions?

I ordered a Diamondback Response, but both the original and replacement, the left crankarm stripped out putting the pedal in, so would like to avoid that model of bike.
Just for future reference, the left side (the one without the chainrings) pedal tightens opposite thread - lefty tighty. The way I always remember which is which is that pedals tighten towards the front of the bike and loosen towards the rear. Dunno if this had anything to do with them stripping out or not, but never hurts to know.

Like Jeffj asked, what kind of riding do you have near you? Do you think you'll be into riding dirt roads, woodsy trails, paved trails, in the city? Do any biking or other sports in the past? Where are you geographically, and what made you choose riding as a way of getting out for some exercise, opposed to say, hitting a treadmill?

Knowing any sort of stuff like that will help people point you in the right direction a little better as far as bike choices. Personally, I find that when you do something that's enjoyable like riding a bike, because it's fun, it's more likely something you'll keep at, which makes riding a great choice for getting active IMO. Make it fun for yourself and the fitness aspect will just happen.

I'd also suggest checking out the Clydesdale forum and maybe throwing a post up there - bound to get some good input re: gear for big guys.
 

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This bike on ebay has a good quality Raidon air fork. That air will let you set the sag even if you are on the heavy side. Cheap coil spring forks can be limited to 225lbs. and that is with the stiffest available spring. And then they have other performance limitations.
2013 Marin Bobcat Trail 29er 19" MTB Hardtail Bike Shimano 9S Hydraulic Disc New | eBay
REI has a similar bike with that fork on sale for 800 now-- the Novara Ponderosa.
You can test ride it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I appreciate everyone's time and the responses.

I'm about 5"11 and 345lbs, looking to drop about 40-50 lbs, and then if needed I'd be open to buying a better and more suited bike.

I'll be riding on gravel, asphalt, and trails. I can't say i'll be on any one of those three more than the other.
 

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Personally I'd stay clear of a 29er. If you could find a really nice used 26" mountain bike you would be better off.

I'm overly biased, but a 90's steel bike like an old GT is pretty indestructible and they are cheap. The problem will be finding one that doesn't require a lot of work.

John
 

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Usually your money is gonna go farthest on a used bike, but there are also real benefits to buying from you local shop; kind of depends on how comfortable you are with mechanical stuff in general, and what your local market is like.

Where do you live?
Local info is always best if you can get it.
 

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Rogue Exterminator
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This bike on ebay has a good quality Raidon air fork. That air will let you set the sag even if you are on the heavy side. Cheap coil spring forks can be limited to 225lbs. and that is with the stiffest available spring. And then they have other performance limitations.
2013 Marin Bobcat Trail 29er 19" MTB Hardtail Bike Shimano 9S Hydraulic Disc New | eBay
REI has a similar bike with that fork on sale for 800 now-- the Novara Ponderosa.
You can test ride it.
That Marin could end up being a steal (curently about $350 after shipping).
Almost tempted to take it myself and part it out. lol (not going to tough).

Anyways, I highly encourage REI. I know it is a little more money but their satisfaction makes it worth it especially for like a stout fellow like yourself. I am not saying return the bike when something brakes because (and I mean no offense by this) but stuff will break more with a guy your size. However if you realize it isn't going to hold up at all you can take it back.

Trying to lose 50 lbs is awesome but I hope you keep on from there.

BTW, you may want to also research this in the Clydesdale forum. There are a lot of guys in there that are or have experienced the same challenges that you are going to be dealing with.
 

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Even though 29ers are often marketted to larger folks, 26 inch wheels are stronger and better for super-clydes, IMO. A rigid fork is better than any cheap suspension fork. For gravel and smooth paths, you don't need suspension, just nice fat tires. Rigid 26ers used to be extremely common (well, in the beginning, they were the only mountain bikes); unfortunately they are harder to come by these days. If you could find a good deal on a Surly Troll or even an 26" LHT, that would be my recommendation. Bikes built for touring, such as the Troll and LHT, are strong and designed to carry big heavy loads. Or, as already mentioned, look for an older 80's or 90's model rigid 26er, preferrably reconditioned (if you have a shop or co-op that sells those).
 

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Went to the lbs today, got fitted tried a few different bikes. Ended with a specialized hardrock sport. Will try to report back with how it holds up to my size already clocked 2 miles on it
Congrats on the purchase and hopefully a new change in your life.
Stick with it and you will be riding 50-100 miles like my friend who used to be about the same size.

As somebody that used to be a little over weight himself and also used to work in fitness I promise you that if you stick with it you will achieve more than you ever thought you could. I also promise that at times you will hate life and even be discouraged but when you achieve those goals you will never regret the work you put in. It is all up to you at this point. Good luck.
 

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turtles make me hot
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That bike should survive you fine. One of my friends has one and gave me the rear wheel to straighten. Heavy, but tough as nails.
in fact, you'll want to have the spoke tension gone over if yours is anything like his was.
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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One route to go would be one of these with some more suitable tires:

BAD BOY 9 - Bad Boy - Urban - Recreation & Urban - Bikes - 2013

or maybe one of these:

Diamondback Trace Sport Bike - 2014 at REI.com

They're hybrids that fall somewhere between flat bar road bikes and 29er mountain bikes. Lots of companies make them, and you might find some nice used ones on CL or at a yard/garage sale.

Their forte would be gravel roads, but they are capable on the road, and OK on fire roads, or relatively tame trails and paths.
 
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