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Shreddin the Cul de Sac
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My boy is playing his first season of street hockey. He's good, he can run and shoot with pretty good accuracy. He need help with his confidence and fundamentals.
I'm trying, but I'm no hockey player myself. And trying to explain offense/defense, positions, etc to a 5 yo is daunting.

Can anyone recommend resources, books, games, or whatever that I can work with my boy to help him ramp up on the fundamentals?

Thanks a bunch.
 

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Hrm 5yr old eh? Thats gunna be tough? Does he play any other team sports? That might help to relate them.

In the spring/summer when i wasnt on the ice i spent alot of time with a tennis ball working on my stick handeling and shooting skills aginst the garage door. My parents hated it cause when i stated getting bigger i could put dents/holes in the door :). Im shure you can help him with defence and offence skills by just playing in the driveway with him, and you get to spend time with your son. Just playing and messing around with no direction, just having fun, sometimes helped me to learn stupid crazy imaginative stickhandling moves, that work.
 

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Dain Bramaged
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Whoa...

Sorry, I can't help you with your questions but I had a huge deja-vu moment when logging onto MTBR just now. I was just on a hockey goalie-specific bulletin board and answering another goalie's question about bikes (which is very rare for that BB) and I log onto MTBR and the first question up is a bout hockey (which is rare for this BB). Weird mental check there for a minute - I actually double checked the URL!!

My son is 8 and has been playing ice hockey for a few years. The best I can tell you is to help him understand that everybody wants the puck/ball, so don't try to hog it and watch for others to pass to. Passing is cool. Practice shooting (a lot) with a bucket of balls or pucks and a net in the garage (or a sheet of plywood against the wall). I dunno what else to tell you - my whole mentality is ice hockey.

Good luck and I hope he has fun!
 

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usahockey.com has a skill set progression list for different age levels under "youth hockey". There is a lot more on that site (usa hockey basically oversees refereeing and other aspects of hockey (insl. inline for all age levels) that would probably be useful to you. The local rink is the obvious other resource. From my own experience, I am glad that I learned how to skate when i was 3. Skating is by far the single most important aspect of being a good hockey player. better skater= better player. So... I would suggest less "street" hockey and more time on the ice (or on inlines if that's what you're doing) so the basics like stopping, crossovers, and backwards skating are taken care of. Being summer, you may also want to look for a kids hockey camp to get a jump start on next season (Some of my best memories growing up were summer hockey camps) Hope some of that was helpful, enjoy the greatest game on earth. OT: congrats to the DU pioneers for their 2nd straight national championship!
 

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Reformed car junkie
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Skating with your knees bent is the most important skill for a hockey player to learn. Being that hes 5 once he gets it(which will be very very hard) it will be natural to him and because he can skate well he can focus on other skills. Some people are better at certain things then others. I could put the puck on someones tape goal line to far blue line all day long, but ask me to skate it through a few players and i was freaking lost. Try to find some clinics in your area, but skate skate skate is the best advice i can give you.
 

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Your Customer Sales Rep
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I won't claim to be an expert, but from my experience, typical 5-year olds (prodigy's excluded) don't really understand strategy, position etc. At that level, I would say there are 2 positions, goalie and everything else. I would play lots of 1-on-1 (hey ... "quality time", bonus!) to develop skills and build confidence. Don't forget to tell him that having fun is the most important thing. D.
 

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Time is not a road.
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I'd agree that skating is the most important fundamental. Ice skating is more daunting than inline skating, so if you have to the chance to build those skills with your little guy, they'll translate well to the pavement. If not, encourage him to skate just for the sake of skating - or, skate with him; paved trails, parking lots, etc. Skating w/o a stick also improves balance. Skate backwards, forwards, cross over -front and back. Being able to move around the rink is the biggest confidence builder. The stick handling and such become more natural later.

And also, watch as much as you can. Go to local games, get that Center Ice package on cable (obviously this year is shot, but there are some great minor league teams out there, not to mention college, which is cheap and entertaining!). You can learn a lot by just being there.

Oh man, if you're in Mass, you should have tons of opportunity to get your son into hockey. That's like hockey-central next to Canada!
 

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There's no app for this.
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1st, lock him out and then

j/k. ;)

Like Duncan! says, at that age, it's just fun and motor skills learning. It's also the best experience to just watch the little (armour-laden, stick holding) critters make their way around awkwardly... and trying in desperation to seize the puck without falling down. It's a genuine hoot and one to remember for a loooooooooooooooonnnnggggggg time.

Good luck, Jim
 

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ever forward
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Now I'm pissed -OT

Not too busy today, snuck out early to get a ride in. Finished the ride, got cleaned up, pizza on the way, sitting on the couch. Shouldn't we be in the heat of the playoff races right about now? NHL package on satellite, 5 or 6 games to choose from?

Don't want to hi-jack the thread. I'm just pissed.
 

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Shreddin the Cul de Sac
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No problem

arturo7 said:
Don't want to hi-jack the thread. I'm just pissed.
So far most of the advice I've received about street hockey involved learning how to ice skate...

I've tried digging up a couple books, but so far what seem to be working well is just drawing out a rink with the face off circles, and center and blue lines, and just talking about who stands where, and what each positions job is.

We'll see at this week's practice if any of it sunk in.
 
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At your sons age you should focus on the basics of the game. Ice hockey and roller hockey are somewhat the same as for the rules. But there are differences. Talk to him about the positions of players. Where they should be in relation to the play. Talk about off-sides. It is one of the things that get's confusing for the little ones. As for practice drills: passing drills and more passing drills. Shooting drills and passing drills will work together for some more fun. Like it was stated before, check out USAHockey. They have some great drills and things you can read up on. Keep it simple and have fun. Also running and stopping with the puck or ball will be a good drill. Control is what your after in this drill. Practice stickhandling with the head up, not looking at the ball. Progress to moving around while stickhandling (still have head up). Talk about the rules of the game and make sure he or she understands them. All in all have fun, it's a great sport and can be a great way to see the country or world.
 

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Burpee said:
So far most of the advice I've received about street hockey involved learning how to ice skate...

I've tried digging up a couple books, but so far what seem to be working well is just drawing out a rink with the face off circles, and center and blue lines, and just talking about who stands where, and what each positions job is.

We'll see at this week's practice if any of it sunk in.
I think Heckler35 has it right. At the age of five, it's a bit much for him to learn positional play, really. The best thing he can learn is how to control the ball. Put a net in the driveway and let him and his buddies deke & shoot...which they will happily do for hours on end. Structured drills are great but they'll get bored of that pretty quick, so I wouldn't emphasize them at the expense of fun.
 

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Gazz said:
I think Heckler35 has it right. At the age of five, it's a bit much for him to learn positional play, really. The best thing he can learn is how to control the ball. Put a net in the driveway and let him and his buddies deke & shoot...which they will happily do for hours on end. Structured drills are great but they'll get bored of that pretty quick, so I wouldn't emphasize them at the expense of fun.
I'd agree w/ Gazz. It's just a game. I don't think sending a 5 year old to hockey school is the right approach. Once he gets the hang of the "game" when he's older. My 7 year old nephew started to play hockey this winter & hard a difficult time w/ offside. The coach tried to explain to him that the player w/ the puck had to cross the blue line first.

He ended up playing defence which he didn't mind. Pulled a Ulf Samuelson to check a puck carrier the 1 game I saw him play. (He actually fell turning around & his leg tripped the other player). I thought he'd get a penalty, but they never called it. I guess they figured it wasn't intentional.
 

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Lazy People Suck
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It may make some hockey players cringe, but having one son who plays hockey and another who plays soccer, there are alot of similarities in the spacing and passing lanes and playing in "triangles". Playing soccer in the offseason will help with positioning.

Also be wary of being sucked into it too deep too quick. My son started at 5, showed some real aptitude and got into it and just finished his second season of travel mite hockey and is now sort of indicating he may not want to play next season. I would hate to see it as he was a really good skater the second he stepped on the ice, but I can understand that an 8 yr old can get burned out pretty quickly playing a 40-50 game schedule. I see it happening more and more in almost all youth sports, but hockey seems to have a little higher level of fanaticism than most sports.
 

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The nephew played house league which involves no travelling. My brother & I never played organized hockey, but were always out playing road hockey.

We've both been exposed to co-workers who's sons are the next Gretzky & they are constantly on the road & playing in tournaments. No wonder kids get burned out.
 
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