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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always used the 16-24 oz/ hr reccomendation for water intake during a ride. This usually works pretty well for me.

Today I did 85 miles in 95 degree heat w/ high humidity and just felt thirsty the entire time. I got some ice water about 60 miles in and drank about 20 oz of it and once and felt really bloated and full. It seems that sweet spot is still 20-25 oz/hr even in the heat and I am stuck feeling thirsty the whole time. I dont get it.

What is everyone elses experience with this issue?
 

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In preparation for the 2010 24HRs of Adrenalin World Solo 24HR Champs in Australia, there are a series of articles on diet, nutrition and hydration in the regular newsletters leading up to the champs.

These newsletters are archived and available here. Editions 7, 8 and 9 contain the best articles. They are written by Jennii English, a sports dietician, who is also the wife of the current World and Australian Solo 24Hr Champ Jason English. Listening to her advice seems to work OK for him :)
 

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It ain't easy being Green
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Drinking 20oz of ice water in one go while you are riding is always going to be bad however hot it is! I had a similar experience last weekend, 24oz per hour just didn't cut it in hot humid weather. I think it is helpful to pre-hydrate the day before if you know that you are going long the next day, and be sure to drink 24-32oz before you start riding (but not all at once!). Yes, you'll need to pee but that's much less inconvenient than running dry (unless you are racing).

Increase your fluid intake to 32oz per hour, although this may involve some planning to ensure that you have enough refuelling stops en route. It's going to be a long summer so you will have plenty of time to figure out what works for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
le Matelot said:
In preparation for the 2010 24HRs of Adrenalin World Solo 24HR Champs in Australia, there are a series of articles on diet, nutrition and hydration in the regular newsletters leading up to the champs.

These newsletters are archived and available here. Editions 7, 8 and 9 contain the best articles. They are written by Jennii English, a sports dietician, who is also the wife of the current World and Australian Solo 24Hr Champ Jason English. Listening to her advice seems to work OK for him :)
I don't see a 9th one there...am I missing something?

Also, anyone tried the weighing before and after method to accurately replace fluid? It makes some sense but I wonder if it is similar to the calorie deficit that develops when riding due to the bodies inability to process more than 300 or so calories or so an hour...
 

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I know that I focus on prehydration so that my body cools itself correctly, commonly sipping on 20oz during 10-12 mile rides, anything longer is bad territory for cramping and dehydration so I carry my 50oz. camelback and my caged bottle with something sweet in it (sweet tea mix) to restore some of my glucose and eloctrolytes.

Hope my exerience helps someone else out there?
 

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If it's over 90, I try to up my fluid intake by about 6-8 ounces per hour. Simple, but it seems to work for me.
 

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My summer riding here in East Texas is in very humid and hot weather. We're talking mid 90's to low 100's and humidity levels of 80-90%. I average just under 2 big bottles per hour. These are road rides of 3-4 hours.
I got back from a one week trip to Colorado and drank 24-30 oz per hour. Temps were 70-80 and low humidity.
 

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Your body can only process about 18 to 24 ounces of water in a hour - the rest will just sit there. There's much you can do to get around that - so dumping water on your head or down your back will go a long way towards keeping you cool - sadly hydration is a delicate science and depends on your body - I know even on the hotest days that I can't drink more than one bottle in an hour. Now - what you put into that bottle is BIG deal and much bigger deal on those hot days - more electrolytes - because you're sweating all the good stuff out. I'm not pro and not very scientific with my approach - I'm sure there is a better way - but I know what works for me and that's the key.
 

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santacruzflyer said:
My summer riding here in East Texas is in very humid and hot weather. We're talking mid 90's to low 100's and humidity levels of 80-90%. I average just under 2 big bottles per hour. These are road rides of 3-4 hours.
I got back from a one week trip to Colorado and drank 24-30 oz per hour. Temps were 70-80 and low humidity.
i live in dallas and its the same thing. 2 bottles (40 oz) per hour. i weigh before and after to make sure im getting enough.
 

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I agree with 24-Solo; in that it's a non-basic science. Everyone I know consumes slightly different amounts of fluids; body weight, the body's plumbing, and what they're wearing all seem to affect one's body's comfort factor.

Simply put, you need to train enough that you can find what works for you. Keep track of all the variables in a notebook; weather (temp/humidity), what you ate before and after the ride, how much water you consumed before/during/after, what you wore during the ride, and ultimately how you felt immediately and several hours after the ride and into the next day (recovery cycle).
 

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Pre-hydrate, and make sure there are electrolytes in that liquid. I made the mistake of water-only prehydration before a hot 6-hour race and suffered through 5 hours of cramps.

-Ryan
 

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Over 100f in the San Diego valleys today; did a 5-hour 90 mile road ride and put some theories to the test, things that I did not do last week when I bonked horribly.

1. Prehydation : drank over a half gallon of gatorade yesterday, together with my usual "too much" coffee.
2. Four endurolytes and 32oz gatorade with breakfast.

I felt much, much better on the ride today than last Saturday even though the temp was warmer. I made sure, actually forced myself, to drink at least 24oz per hour and took extra endurolytes too, but I did that last week and still felt lousy.

Conclusion: for me, the pre-hydration thing works. That's science, that is! ;)
 

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Supposed to consume 5-12oz every 20 minutes. A little at a time is better than a lot at once.
 

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Fluid replacement guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine
You guys will try to hit a target in the dark.... at least read this and will point you in the right direction
Sweating rates vary incredible from person to person. Learn to weight yourself before and after to have an idea (after substracting fluid consumed and adding amount peed)of your seating rate; then try to match your losses (sometimes is very dificult but attainable)
Read about osmolality; the more concentrated the solution (over 8% carbs and around 300 mosm/L) that you put in you body the more it takes to abandon your stomach and that its what happens to many of you.
24 Solo, the body can absorb way more than 24 oz in a hour (depending pace or intensity off course) and pouring water in your head or back might feel goo but does NOTHING to decrease your core temperature which is the point of being properly hydrated (allow your body to transport heat from the core to the skin to release heat through evaporation, radiation, etc)
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2007/02000/Exercise_and_Fluid_Replacement.22.aspx
 

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BBW said:
Fluid replacement guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine
You guys will try to hit a target in the dark.... at least read this and will point you in the right direction
Sweating rates vary incredible from person to person. Learn to weight yourself before and after to have an idea (after substracting fluid consumed and adding amount peed)of your seating rate; then try to match your losses (sometimes is very dificult but attainable)
Read about osmolality; the more concentrated the solution (over 8% carbs and around 300 mosm/L) that you put in you body the more it takes to abandon your stomach and that its what happens to many of you.
24 Solo, the body can absorb way more than 24 oz in a hour (depending pace or intensity off course) and pouring water in your head or back might feel goo but does NOTHING to decrease your core temperature which is the point of being properly hydrated (allow your body to transport heat from the core to the skin to release heat through evaporation, radiation, etc)
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2007/02000/Exercise_and_Fluid_Replacement.22.aspx
Good article, don't think anybody will read the entire thing though.:thumbsup:
 

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All very good points and valid approaches, I would add that proper hydration is the one facet of endurance racing that can and needs to be worked on and off the bike. Staying hydrated all week long goes a long way towards successful races for me. It's taken me a long time to learn the discipline involved in drinking plenty of fluids morning noon and night, at work, at home, out on the town and every other damn place I find myself.
 
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