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Discussion Starter #1
I had a custom TI road bike built 11 years ago, with sliding dropouts for a Rohloff. A few weeks ago -- after about 66,000 miles -- the left seatstay completely cracked in 2 while I was riding, for no apparent reason. (Didn't crash, hit a pothole, etc.) Sent it to get looked at, the guy said he can repair it, but it needs to be "reinforced" due to the torque of the Rohloff. (Have no idea exactly how he "reinforces" it.) Does this mean I was supposed to use the torque arm? Is that why the frame broke? I thought it was only for "regular" frames (with traditional dropouts)? I have a single-speed hardtail MTB, with sliding dropouts, also with a Rohloff. Should I get a T.A. for that, to prevent another "failure?"
 

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Total bummer.

Total bummer. Very sorry this has happened but at least it can be repaired. Which kind of brakes does your bicycle use? Seems that's a stipulation as well.



From the Rohloff website directly:

"Torgue Anchoring"

https://www.rohloff.de/en/service/handbook/handbuch-web/assembly/torque-anchoring

"What you can expect to find on this page

The torque that occurs when driving with a SPEEDHUB must be absorbed using a support on the frame. Here we present the different variants of torque supports within our modular system.

Standard long torque arm

All Rohloff SPEEDHUB 500/14 versions not carrying the codes OEM or OEM2 come included with the long torque arm for supporting the torque. This must be mounted to the axle plate."





https://www.cyclingabout.com/understanding-the-different-types-of-rohloff-hub/

"Axle plates are necessary to fasten internally geared hubs to a bicycle frame.

The three axle plates available with Rohloff hubs are:
– OEM plate (for frames with Rohloff dropouts);
– OEM2 plate (for frames which have disc brake mounts or a support bolt); and
– Standard plate (or Torque Arm plate, for bikes which require the use of a torque arm).

The neatest solution is to use a frame with Rohloff dropouts and the OEM plate, like us. If you don’t have Rohloff dropouts you can use the Standard plate (with torque arm) for non-disc compatible frames, or the OEM2 plate for disc brake compatible frames.

The Monkeybone is a really neat IS disc brake adapter which integrates a support point for the OEM2 plate to mount. Your frame must have an International Standard (IS) disc brake interface on the seatstay, and your disc brake caliper must have a Postmount interface.

The Speedbone can fit onto an International Standard (IS) disc brake interface and becomes a support point for the OEM2 plate to sit."




I'm still curious how to determine which frames require the use of a torque arm as well... Why not use them an all frames to help support the frame anyway? How do you know which code your frame has (OEM or OEM2)? That information must maybe come directly from the manufacturer? :confused:

Keep us updated on what you find out.

Best regards,
Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That bike has rim brakes. (I assume that's the OEM plates.) The MTB is disc. There are not "plates" on that, just the sliders built into the frame. (But the MTB has what I guess is extra "support" in that there is a small tube that runs between the left seat- and chain-stay.)
 

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Makes sense.

That bike has rim brakes. (I assume that's the OEM plates.) The MTB is disc. There are not "plates" on that, just the sliders built into the frame. (But the MTB has what I guess is extra "support" in that there is a small tube that runs between the left seat- and chain-stay.)

That makes complete sense to me about it being the OEM plates with rim brakes on the bicycle that had the tubing break. I understand now. Thank you

So, if there are sliders built into the frame does there always have to be a bridged seat stay to make it strong enough than? Is that what yours is going to have installed to reinforce it after the repair? I'm hoping someone more experienced can chime in here and help. ;)

Best regards,
Jason
 
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