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Ok, sorry ahead of time for my ignorance.

In a VPP setup, by the way I understand it, the pivot makes the rear swingarm go up and away from the bike. Yet the chain tension keeps the wheel from going back, so it keeps the whole setup in check? Would this or whould it not want the chain to snap under repeated hard grinding? I dont know....

And if im competly wrong...can somene explain this system to me?

thanks...
 

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Won't happen

Gramatica said:
Ok, sorry ahead of time for my ignorance.

In a VPP setup, by the way I understand it, the pivot makes the rear swingarm go up and away from the bike. Yet the chain tension keeps the wheel from going back, so it keeps the whole setup in check? Would this or whould it not want the chain to snap under repeated hard grinding? I dont know....

And if im competly wrong...can somene explain this system to me?

thanks...
The chainstay length is at it's shortest when you have correct sag. When you pedal, the chain wants to pull the rear wheel towards the crank, which in the case of VPP also means that the rear suspension is pulled to the correct sag position. This is what gives VPP-bikes such stable and quick pedaling.

If you hit a bump that puts a larger force on the rear suspension than the chain forces from your pedalling, the VPP will simply pull a little on the chain, and you'll feel a slight feedback in the pedals. As long as your legs aren't strong enough to rip the chain apart during pedalling on a hardtail, the VPP can't do any damage to your chain.

Ole.
 

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Ole said:
The chainstay length is at it's shortest when you have correct sag. When you pedal, the chain wants to pull the rear wheel towards the crank, which in the case of VPP also means that the rear suspension is pulled to the correct sag position. This is what gives VPP-bikes such stable and quick pedaling.

If you hit a bump that puts a larger force on the rear suspension than the chain forces from your pedalling, the VPP will simply pull a little on the chain, and you'll feel a slight feedback in the pedals. As long as your legs aren't strong enough to rip the chain apart during pedalling on a hardtail, the VPP can't do any damage to your chain.

Ole.
But since the vpp system uses the chain, doesnt the chain get stretched alot faster then if on another susp. design?
 

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Why?

SuperNewb said:
But since the vpp system uses the chain, doesnt the chain get stretched alot faster then if on another susp. design?
It's still your legs either pulling the chain, or being pulled on by the chain, so why should the chain be worn more? Unless you somehow get superpowers when you jump on a VPP bike, there's no difference. The chain isn't locked to the frame, its still attached to the cranks, and those are in turn controlled bu the mucles in your legs.


Ole.
 

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The VPP design applies no more stress to the chain than any other bike. In fact, my singlespeed chain sees far more stretching loads than on any other suspension bike I've ever ridden.
 
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