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So, Vorsprung have an upcoming coil conversion for forks and I thought it would be good to get a thread going.
One thing I noticed they are doing that Push are not is supporting travel up to 180mm. I have a brand new 36 on the way and will be getting a smashpot when they come out, I've heard towards the end of the year.

Spring looks like it runs the entire length of the fork, is there an advantage doing this way?

More details here;

https://bikerumor.com/2018/09/10/cr...bike-care-products-and-yakimas-hangover-rack/
 

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Vorsprung Suspension
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So, Vorsprung have an upcoming coil conversion for forks and I thought it would be good to get a thread going.
One thing I noticed they are doing that Push are not is supporting travel up to 180mm. I have a brand new 36 on the way and will be getting a smashpot when they come out, I've heard towards the end of the year.

Spring looks like it runs the entire length of the fork, is there an advantage doing this way?

More details here;

https://bikerumor.com/2018/09/10/cr...bike-care-products-and-yakimas-hangover-rack/
We run a longer spring for a few reasons:

1. It lets us get 170mm and 180mm travel variants. Modern singlecrown forks run quite short stanchions relative to their travel, fitting a coil in there is actually surprisingly difficult and there is a distinct ceiling on both travel and available spring rate for coils within those confines. It seems self-evident that riders running the longest travel bikes are the ones most inclined to prioritise the bump-eating aspects of suspension performance over the lightest possible weight, so cutting out the longest travel variants didn't make much sense to us.

2. Running a cartridge-style system where the topout assembly is housed inside the main spring allows us to make a universal kit that can easily be installed in different forks and/or at different travels. Different forks only require different top caps (and foot studs if changing brands, the RS and Fox ones are different) but everything else is the same, including the springs. This means you can pull the cartridge out of one fork and install it in a different one, at a different travel if need be (changing travel is done with spacers provided in the kit, no new parts), at a minimum of cost.

There's a few other logistical aspects (particularly relevant to shops and suspension workshops actually) that this design addresses as well - it means shops can stock the kits at very low risk that they'll end up with expensive parts that never happen to fit their customer's particular fork, because the most expensive bits fit everything.

Also there are a couple of minor errors in that Bikerumor article for anyone who cares - only one EWS racer so far was actually running the Smashpot, although there were a number of high profile riders on Luftkappes through 2017 and 18. Secondly, the kit is actually 130-180mm adjustable (not 140-180).

There's a bit more going on with these kits that we haven't revealed yet, full info including pricing and release date will be forthcoming once they're ready to go. Feel free to email with any questions in the meantime.

Steve
Vorsprung Suspension
 

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I really don't get the coil hype. From what I understand is that a coil fork is going to feel very similar to a properly functioning air fork.
You have to try one. The reduction in stiction is yuuge. Especially in cooler weather. And no funky spring rate at the start of the travel, just buttery smooth linear predictable travel. Not to mention that the spring rate remains the same at all temperatures.
 

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I really don't get the coil hype. From what I understand is that a coil fork is going to feel very similar to a properly functioning air fork.
A good air spring works very well overall. Sounds like you've never ridden a coil system though? Try one and judge for yourself. Coil spring systems have advantages and disadvantages - the spring rate is completely linear (advantage in the first 1/3 of the stroke for compliance and the middle 1/3 for mid-stroke support, disadvantage at the end where higher force is beneficial, hence the anti-bottoming system), friction is zero vs "low enough" in air springs, they are completely temperature insensitive, they're considerably heavier, they don't get stickier between services, they have distinct spring increments instead of being infinitely adjustable, you can run a lot more lubricant in the lowers, etc.

Horses for courses. We are certainly not abandoning air springs, but there's a certain contingent of people who just want their bikes to eat bumps as well as possible with minimum fuss even if it's a bit heavier. Those are the people who'll want this kit. For others, the Luftkappe might serve you better.
 

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Super genius.. Another take on the coil that looks very well thought out. Johnshonda, even the latest and greatest air springs don't compare to the feel of a coil. I've been on the push coil a year and rode the 2019 36 with the air spring for a few weeks to see if it was as good as they say. It just can't match the suppleness and consistent feel of a coil. I've already gone back to coil since. While the air has gotten better it's still not really "coil like" as they claim with each new fork model year release. It may seem like it until you actually ride a coil. Kudos Vorsprung, thanks for the continued innovation.
 

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SteveVS - How old of a fork do you guys make this kit for? I have a 2010 Fox 36 that I would love a coil for. I'm not in any position to buy a new bike anytime soon, but I can foot the bill for a coil kit. I'm still riding a 26" Knolly Chilcotin.
 

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I really don't get the coil hype. From what I understand is that a coil fork is going to feel very similar to a properly functioning air fork.
Sounds like you've never ridden a properly setup coil fork. They beat air springs everywhere.

Air springs with three chambers (negative and two positive) do a very good job. But there is absolutely nothing that behaves and feels like a coil spring.

We're looking forward to delivery of these. They fill a big gap in the market.
 

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SteveVS - How old of a fork do you guys make this kit for? I have a 2010 Fox 36 that I would love a coil for. I'm not in any position to buy a new bike anytime soon, but I can foot the bill for a coil kit. I'm still riding a 26" Knolly Chilcotin.
At the moment, back to 2015 for the 36. The difference between a kit to fit the 2015 and a 2010 is just a top cap though due to the modular design, so hardly unreasonable to make something for that.
 

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Super genius.. Another take on the coil that looks very well thought out. Johnshonda, even the latest and greatest air springs don't compare to the feel of a coil. I've been on the push coil a year and rode the 2019 36 with the air spring for a few weeks to see if it was as good as they say. It just can't match the suppleness and consistent feel of a coil. I've already gone back to coil since. While the air has gotten better it's still not really "coil like" as they claim with each new fork model year release. It may seem like it until you actually ride a coil. Kudos Vorsprung, thanks for the continued innovation.
Thanks for the kind words. Credit where credit is due though - the speed sensitive HBO system was pioneered by Jeremy Wilkey at MX-Tech several years ago, we've adapted that concept for MTB and made it externally adjustable to account for the proportionally wider weight range of MTBs.
 

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I'll be converting my 36 to coil over the winter. Will definitely have to give this kit a hard look vs Push in execution, price & weight.
 

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Thanks for all the feedback on the coil vs. air, as you can tell I have zero experience with a coil fork. Makes sense to me and I do notice a difference in colder temps. Hmmmm…..already have an Avy cart in the pike, but now it sounds like I need to think about coil.
 

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Is there any inheriant benefit to being coil or air on both ends of the bike?

(front/rear)
air/coil vs coil/coil vs coil/air?

Recently switched to coil on the rear and some types of features just feel really poor now but I haven't been able to tune it out with damper adjustments. It feels like under moderate loads, the rear is too deep in it's travel and the weight balance front to rear is off.
 

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Is there any inheriant benefit to being coil or air on both ends of the bike?

(front/rear)
air/coil vs coil/coil vs coil/air?
I've got all three options on bikes here. Currently running air front and coil rear on my most used bike. It depends on a hundred factors but generally you can get them to balance well even with different springs at each end.

My preference is coil/coil. Advantages of air are lighter weight and easy spring rate adjustments.
 
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