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2 plugs in two weeks. My conclusion is the rubber where there are no knobs is too thin. I live in upstate NY primitive trails, but rootier, wetter, softer, less sharp rocks. In 6 years here, I have never needed to plug a tire on my local trails.

I did cut a Vittora Morsa in a similar location, in the rubber with no knobs, bunny hopping onto a traffic island ringed with rocks. On a trip to Deer Valley, Utah, a Barzo on the rear required several plugs.

This is the Agarro Trail Graphene 2. I am wondering if their basic trail casing isn't strong enough on the exposed rubber between the knobs.

I really do like the tread pattern for a rear tire, the durometer of the rubber for varying conditions and rooty terrain, and the suppleness of the casing, but cannot recommend it from my limited experience compared to other rear tires on my terrain.

I am a sucker though, and am waiting on a Martello 2.3 for the front.
Interesting. I have beat mine hard since release on some of the trails notorious in my area and known as tire killers. Never even a hiccup. These trails have eaten many tires before these.

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Interesting. I have beat mine hard since release on some of the trails notorious in my area and known as tire killers. Never even a hiccup. These trails have eaten many tires before these.

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Yeah everyone rides differently, and terrain is obviously quite variable in different regions as well, but I've found the Agarros to be extremely resistant to damage. One thing to think about - I think the higher pressure you run, the more likely you are to get a sharp rock to actually punch directly through the tread casing. I run pretty low pressure as I've mentioned before, and the only time I flat is when I pinch the tire (between a rock and the rim). The Agarros have been really resistant to this, likely due to the closely-spaced knobs and the anti-pinch-flat insert they use near the rim area.

Ashwin, what pressure were you running? Any idea what you may have hit that was sharp and thin enough to puncture between the knobs like that?
 

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I don't think your original post was snarky. Experiences are on a bell curve and the most dissatisfied experiences get told on the internet. I would have preferred your complaints to be more specific. Incidentally, the guy my group waits for the most is fixing his XR2 rear tire. I don't know why he sticks with it.

I'm willing to give the Agarro a try, but not on the rear. Vittoria has too many good rear tires. I'd cut off every other transition knob and use it with a Mezcal or Morsa rear.
Has anyone clipped the transition knobs to make it run better as a front tire?
 

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2 plugs in two weeks. My conclusion is the rubber where there are no knobs is too thin. I live in upstate NY primitive trails, but rootier, wetter, softer, less sharp rocks. In 6 years here, I have never needed to plug a tire on my local trails.

I did cut a Vittora Morsa in a similar location, in the rubber with no knobs, bunny hopping onto a traffic island ringed with rocks. On a trip to Deer Valley, Utah, a Barzo on the rear required several plugs.

This is the Agarro Trail Graphene 2. I am wondering if their basic trail casing isn't strong enough on the exposed rubber between the knobs.

I really do like the tread pattern for a rear tire, the durometer of the rubber for varying conditions and rooty terrain, and the suppleness of the casing, but cannot recommend it from my limited experience compared to other rear tires on my terrain.

I am a sucker though, and am waiting on a Martello 2.3 for the front.
Just bad luck. The Enduro/ trail tires from Vittoria are super robust ime.
 

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I am light at 138-140lbs, running tubeless on Stans FLOW, 15psi Agarro on the rear. I agree that the closely spaced knobs 'should' make it more resistant to this type of tear. The Morsa had much more empty space.

But if you look at the pictures close, both of the tears are in the same place just inside of the bigger side lug which is an empty space.

It is hard to say what is causing it. Both tears have been on the same trail. I am thinking there is a rock section of shale that has been degrading recently, and wonder if it is getting cut there.
 

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So while you sit back and wonder why
I got this ****in' thorn in my side
Oh my god, it's a mirage
I'm tellin' y'all, it's (Trail) SABOTAGE
 

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I've been hammering the crap out of my Agarro 2.6 (r) and Martello 2.35 (f) over gnarly, rocky, rooty terrain for the past few months and they hardly look worn. I've hit many a rock garden with enough speed to do tyre damage, but these tyres just shrug it off. Maybe I just ride "light", but I am seriously impressed with the Vittorias.

For the record, I am running tubeless, 22 psi front and 23 psi rear on a short travel FS 29er.
 

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I've been hammering the crap out of my Agarro 2.6 (r) and Martello 2.35 (f) over gnarly, rocky, rooty terrain for the past few months and they hardly look worn. I've hit many a rock garden with enough speed to do tyre damage, but these tyres just shrug it off. Maybe I just ride "light", but I am seriously impressed with the Vittorias.

For the record, I am running tubeless, 22 psi front and 23 psi rear on a short travel FS 29er.
I agree, my only mishap was my own fault... snot sealant did not seal a small thorn hole reducing pressure then I landed the rear wheel on a pointed 6” high rock bending the rim and compromising the tire bead.
 

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It really depends on your conditions. For the EC tech I ride, the Agarro is perfect for the rear and the Martello is overkill (not much loose / high speed stuff here). I agree that the Martello is slower (though not nearly as slow as DHF or DHRII) but has better traction overall in loose stuff than the Agarro. If I were riding high speed loose stuff, I'd be inclined to run Mazza/Martello.
Just wanted to weigh in on the Martello as a rear.
It's not exactly a tire that shines in loose stuff, but it's extremely good on hardpack at speed.
I would say it's most similar to Maxxis Aggressor or Schwalbe Hans Dampf, but with a lot better cornering.

I'll be throwing some Agarros on a friend's Fuel EX this week, and I'm quite excited to see how they perform on our local XC trails.
We have lots of rocks and roots, and from what I've seen on youtube and elsewhere, it's quite similar to a lot of US east coast riding.
 

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Just a flesh wound
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600 miles on my Agarros. They are still performing great for me in a 29 x 2.6 front and rear on my Ripmo. I have the wide carbon Ibis rims and I run 15 psi rear with 14 psi front. No burps, one puncture that I had to plug. That was about 300 miles ago.

Very predictable tire with excellent grip on rocks and roots of New England.
 

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Running a 2.35 Agarro on my Spot Ryve with a Maxxis Ardent Race rear. Been very happy with it as an aggressive front tire for our everything and the kitchen sink conditions.
 

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New Tires

So currently I'm running a Maxxis DHRII (R) and DHF(F) on my 130mm 27.5 trailbike. They were excellent in the Alps but for the winter I'm looking to switch to a lighter trail/downcountry tire setup as I'll probably be riding in some milder terrain that's considerably muddier and not quite as rocky. Right now I'm considering a Barzo(R) and Agarro(F) or Agarro F&R. Any thoughts anyone? Also, I'm reading the listed tire widths aren't particularly accurate. I have 27 wide rims and would like tires roughly 2.35in wide at 1.6bar(24psi) front and 1.8(27psi) rear. Any advise is welcome!
 

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So currently I'm running a Maxxis DHRII (R) and DHF(F) on my 130mm 27.5 trailbike. They were excellent in the Alps but for the winter I'm looking to switch to a lighter trail/downcountry tire setup as I'll probably be riding in some milder terrain that's considerably muddier and not quite as rocky. Right now I'm considering a Barzo(R) and Agarro(F) or Agarro F&R. Any thoughts anyone? Also, I'm reading the listed tire widths aren't particularly accurate. I have 27 wide rims and would like tires roughly 2.35in wide at 1.6bar(24psi) front and 1.8(27psi) rear. Any advise is welcome!
On my 29r I’m running Agarro f/r at 20psi
2.6f on 30mm - measures 2.45
2.35r on 27mm - measures 2.3
 

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It’s a good tire but too many of my trails are loose and it didn’t provide the braking and traction I wanted. It also slid out in my in an area of dried grass. I did slice the sidewall but it sealed up too.

I plan to use the Martello/agarro combo for my more Xcish rides 25+ miles. It’s a great combo in more hard pack trails.
 

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I am running that same set-up. Although I think I am getting a little bit more volume out of my 2.6 (closer to 2.5). I really really like.

However, the one drawback is steep and loose braking the Agarro doesn't work so well. As a tough and supportive "XC-ish" tire it works really well. Rolls well on pavement, rolls well on dirt. Grips well in most conditions. Climbing traction is crazy good.

When I feel like changing a tire again, I'll probably go back to an Aggressor on my full suspension bike. It doesn't grip as well climbing, but I think it grips better braking.
 

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So currently I'm running a Maxxis DHRII (R) and DHF(F) on my 130mm 27.5 trailbike. They were excellent in the Alps but for the winter I'm looking to switch to a lighter trail/downcountry tire setup as I'll probably be riding in some milder terrain that's considerably muddier and not quite as rocky. Right now I'm considering a Barzo(R) and Agarro(F) or Agarro F&R. Any thoughts anyone? Also, I'm reading the listed tire widths aren't particularly accurate. I have 27 wide rims and would like tires roughly 2.35in wide at 1.6bar(24psi) front and 1.8(27psi) rear. Any advise is welcome!

Wow... on our terrain in the blown-out Rocky Mountain foothils, I can't imagine using a Barzo out back - much less an Agarro up front! ::jealous:: (Please note I'm not one to have opinions on that kind of terrain - just want to give you a few other data points in your consideration.)

Folks do use the Agarro up front w/ success - but I say there's a key point about the terrain you'll be on:

Personally, I used the Agarro in the rear, and it is an *amazing* tire for it's speed-vs-traction (IMHO, Vittoria tires always seem to be category-leading in this regard for their class). It stuck like glue to hardpack, rocks & even wet roots... and soooo fast. The harder the surface, the more all that Vittoria-siping tech kicks in.

But as soon as you get a little loose-over-hard (from kitty litter up to gravel) it starts to loose its magic. For me - even on the rear - it was fabulous in the spring (moist, 'perfect dirt') but once things dried out, I had to upgrade to the Martello rear. Yes, slight hit on my speed in hardpack, but on my mixed terrain was faster/safer overall - especially on steep techy climbs (amazing), plus extra confidence railing corners hard.

If your terrain has those moments of dried out loose-over-hard, I'd be concerned with Agarro up front at high speeds. (Perhaps, tho, by your description, you don't??) Just FYI to consider.

But, if Barzo not enough in rear, you may want to consider Agarro there... lots of east coast folks seem to *love* it for that, as well as rocky (like Suns_PST in TX). It's magic in Moab! So - you could try the Agarro up front, and if doesn't play well there, move it to rear. Next step up in Vittoria is the Martello which is universally loved.

As far as 'mud', note that Agarro has pretty shallow teeth and closely packed - so I can't imagine it shedding too well. I'd imagine it pretty slippery up front in those conditions.


If you do want to explore other front tire, I'll give you a strange one:

Check out the Tioga Edge 22. Honestly, I've never seen anything else like it. Because they totally remove all the center blocks, not only is their rolling-drag eliminated, but (more importantly) the tire *deformation* that is normally caused by sitting high-up on those blocks is eliminated. (Rubber deformation is a huge parasitic energy loss factor in overall tire efficiency.)

As a result, the E22 rolling resistance vs. traction is *ridiculously* low. Putting it on felt like a rocket ship, and I couldn't believe how it railed corners (better than a DHF, honestly). IMHO, it's one of the rare win/wins in tire design.

It paired magically with the Agarro on rear. Both tires responded well to changes in pressure to 'tune' them for a given ride. I could keep them 'high' (21~23psi) on XC type tracks, or drop down to low (15~17psi) for monster grip when needed - both always hold great.

The bummer w/ E22, is loose or deep. Again, once trails started drying out with more gravel/loose-over-hard, the tire lost its magic in a big way. (So, I had to upgrade to the Mazza for my terrain.)

But, on your terrain, I'm wondering if the E22 could be a perfect fit. Low RR, but with the DHF-like grip you're used to rocking.


If it's of any help, I noticed that Vittoria has a few videos which explain their tires a little more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKsBCuDvBQk&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tc3vvgxtRK4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXcoxSAz2P0
 

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However, the one drawback is steep and loose braking the Agarro doesn't work so well. As a tough and supportive "XC-ish" tire it works really well. Rolls well on pavement, rolls well on dirt. Grips well in most conditions. Climbing traction is crazy good.

When I feel like changing a tire again, I'll probably go back to an Aggressor on my full suspension bike. It does grip as well climbing, but I think it grips better braking.
I found the same issues w/ the Agarro, so I upgraded to the Martello in rear. Was *SO* much better.

Honestly, I think the Martello is better than Agressor all around: it definitely rolls faster, hooks up just as well in the loose for cornering and climbing grip - and slightly lighter, too. But, you get all the extra goodies of Vittoria: siping (better grip on rock/hardpack), better sidewall, better damped, and the Graphene - which is decently tough and great in the wet. Give it a shot.

For my riding terrain and style, the Maxxis tires that beats out Vittoria current selections are:
(1) Dissector in rear - holds a "knife-edge" for corners and climbing better on *SOME* terrain vs. Martello. It's an occasional win for Dissector - but it does happen. However, I found for my terrain, the Martello wins more often. But, it's a close fight of trade-offs.

(2) Assagai in front - it's just such a BEAST with grip. The Vittoria Mazza is (mostly) better than the DHF in every way (except wide-angle leans). But, when you need that absolute-grip only Assagai will do. Shame it's such a boat-anchor to pedal!

Again - all those advantages to Vittoria construction/materials do add up and make a difference vs Maxxis. I'm really starting to learn to love the damped ride, siping and graphene. Guess I've drunk the kool-aid!
 

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Wow... on our terrain in the blown-out Rocky Mountain foothils, I can't imagine using a Barzo out back - much less an Agarro up front! ::jealous:: (Please note I'm not one to have opinions on that kind of terrain - just want to give you a few other data points in your consideration.)

Folks do use the Agarro up front w/ success - but I say there's a key point about the terrain you'll be on:

Personally, I used the Agarro in the rear, and it is an *amazing* tire for it's speed-vs-traction (IMHO, Vittoria tires always seem to be category-leading in this regard for their class). It stuck like glue to hardpack, rocks & even wet roots... and soooo fast. The harder the surface, the more all that Vittoria-siping tech kicks in.

But as soon as you get a little loose-over-hard (from kitty litter up to gravel) it starts to loose its magic. For me - even on the rear - it was fabulous in the spring (moist, 'perfect dirt') but once things dried out, I had to upgrade to the Martello rear. Yes, slight hit on my speed in hardpack, but on my mixed terrain was faster/safer overall - especially on steep techy climbs (amazing), plus extra confidence railing corners hard.

If your terrain has those moments of dried out loose-over-hard, I'd be concerned with Agarro up front at high speeds. (Perhaps, tho, by your description, you don't??) Just FYI to consider.

But, if Barzo not enough in rear, you may want to consider Agarro there... lots of east coast folks seem to *love* it for that, as well as rocky (like Suns_PST in TX). It's magic in Moab! So - you could try the Agarro up front, and if doesn't play well there, move it to rear. Next step up in Vittoria is the Martello which is universally loved.

As far as 'mud', note that Agarro has pretty shallow teeth and closely packed - so I can't imagine it shedding too well. I'd imagine it pretty slippery up front in those conditions.


If you do want to explore other front tire, I'll give you a strange one:

Check out the Tioga Edge 22. Honestly, I've never seen anything else like it. Because they totally remove all the center blocks, not only is their rolling-drag eliminated, but (more importantly) the tire *deformation* that is normally caused by sitting high-up on those blocks is eliminated. (Rubber deformation is a huge parasitic energy loss factor in overall tire efficiency.)

As a result, the E22 rolling resistance vs. traction is *ridiculously* low. Putting it on felt like a rocket ship, and I couldn't believe how it railed corners (better than a DHF, honestly). IMHO, it's one of the rare win/wins in tire design.

It paired magically with the Agarro on rear. Both tires responded well to changes in pressure to 'tune' them for a given ride. I could keep them 'high' (21~23psi) on XC type tracks, or drop down to low (15~17psi) for monster grip when needed - both always hold great.

The bummer w/ E22, is loose or deep. Again, once trails started drying out with more gravel/loose-over-hard, the tire lost its magic in a big way. (So, I had to upgrade to the Mazza for my terrain.)

But, on your terrain, I'm wondering if the E22 could be a perfect fit. Low RR, but with the DHF-like grip you're used to rocking.


If it's of any help, I noticed that Vittoria has a few videos which explain their tires a little more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKsBCuDvBQk&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tc3vvgxtRK4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXcoxSAz2P0

Yes, this was exactly the advice I was looking for, thank you so much!:thumbsup::thumbsup:
Like you said, we don't really get much loose over hard here, especially during winter when the ground is pretty much always either solid hard pack or muddy. The E22 seems like a terrific option as well, might give that a shot if I can get my hands on them!
 

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