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We want... a shrubbery!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's see if I can get a little help here...

I've been running Specialized Team Master rear (1.95) and Specialzed Team Control front (2.something) for the past 2 years or so. While these tires have done marginally well as far as I'm concerned, I'm always looking for something better--gotta have any edge you can get, and tires seem to be an inexpensive place to increase performance. Unfotunately I am blessed with having to live in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains--that means I literally need a tire for a bit of everything. Mountains and ridges are dry with a decent soil consistency, but the bottoms are anything but dry and often filled with some good ol' Virginia red clay (if you haven't ridden through red clay, you are seriously missing out ;) ). Also, there are rocks (not that much though) but tons of roots. So yea, any ideas guys, what tires do you fellas (or ladies) run in this region?
 

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I live up in Richmond and am a big fan of IRC Serac tires. They are reasonably light, hook up really well in all types of conditions even mud. You can run lower pressure in them so they grip roots and rocks.

Mike
 

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I run Conti Verts most of the time...

...they pack up with mud alot, but the ability to run lower pressures (I run 30psi front and rear with Tubes) makes them a great tire for Va's roots and rocks.

I see alot of folks riding the Geax Sturdy these days. Might consider those.

Michelins have also worked well here as have Pythons.

ickyickyptngzutboing said:
Let's see if I can get a little help here...

I've been running Specialized Team Master rear (1.95) and Specialzed Team Control front (2.something) for the past 2 years or so. While these tires have done marginally well as far as I'm concerned, I'm always looking for something better--gotta have any edge you can get, and tires seem to be an inexpensive place to increase performance. Unfotunately I am blessed with having to live in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains--that means I literally need a tire for a bit of everything. Mountains and ridges are dry with a decent soil consistency, but the bottoms are anything but dry and often filled with some good ol' Virginia red clay (if you haven't ridden through red clay, you are seriously missing out ;) ). Also, there are rocks (not that much though) but tons of roots. So yea, any ideas guys, what tires do you fellas (or ladies) run in this region?
 

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well

i rode the panaracer fire xc pro or a while and loved them, a little slow rolling--but never let me down! i switched to the kenda karma (put the tire down and walk away----please!), they are fast rolling and you will also be on the ground fast! I am now switching to the wtb weirwolf---heard lot's of good things about them.

Good luck in your search! :cool:
 

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Richmond area too

I live south of Richmond and currently am super happy with my Panaracer Cinders 2.25 . I really like the weirwolf 2.3 but the Cinder hooks up better in the nasty stuff( like black river bank mud, or red clay) and rolls a lot faster on the hardpack. they also beat the crap out of the WTB on deep sand. the traction will amaze a person who tries them . very predictable on the rooty trails of Pocahontas and Battlefield. I am thinking of trying some Seracs for weight savings and just due to reviews. I got the Cinders for $31 a piece online at Airbomb. I can get the Seracs at my favorite shop, Cobblestone bikes
 

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We want... a shrubbery!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the help--I stopped by a LBS and asked what they recommended for the area. For non-racing I was told that a lot of people around here use the Continental Explorer Pro. So I bought a pair from him and testing them out--see how they hold up. So far alright--but the frickin' floor pump I have decided that its pressure gauge should stop working--so I'm not sure what PSI I'm running right now (inflated the tire by feel).

Right now, the spring here has been rather dry (C'ville, VA) so I haven't had a chance to run them in wet conditions. However, I've been doing a lot of riding on very rooty and rocky terrain. I think the front tire needs to lose some air pressure (again, I'm not sure what I'm at) because it's slipping a little too much in the turns I beleive. Also, I'm not content with how the tires are holding up when going up hills with a lot of roots; I feel that I'm spinning out too much--but, I assume that this as well can be associated with the tire pressure? Will reducing the tire pressure in the rear give me more traction?

Ahhhh!!!! Virginia why do you have to have such varying trail conditions???!!!! Sloppy mud/clay directly to the east of town and rocky and rooty fairly dry singletrack to the west!!!

I'll be sure to keep everyone informed if I ever find the perfect tire...
 

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Will reducing the tire pressure in the rear give me more traction?

Ahhhh!!!! Virginia why do you have to have such varying trail conditions???!!!! Sloppy mud/clay directly to the east of town and rocky and rooty fairly dry singletrack to the west!!!


yes it will improve traction. to me thats one of the great things about Va. so much variety in a small area. the park I ride most often( Petersburg National Battlefield) has mud spots,sand,creeks,big hills,little hills,rocky sections. on one trail you go from sand a foot deep to a mud bog within 50 yards,to rooty climb,to sand,to more mud,to superfast hardpack ,then into a deep pit of mud(even in dry weather weve had this spring ), and lots of horse pooh. this is in a mile of trail. its a blast and definetly helps technique and handling skills. a 15 mile trail system with all the natural wonders of the area. not only that but 70k soldiers were casualties within the boundries of the park in the civil war when Lee put Petersburg under seige, so there is the awe factor of thinking of all those men fighting right where Im riding. theyve done a great job of mixing trails with history
 

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Well, we apparently live in the same town...

....I've been on the Verts for a while as they have been (as far as I've been able to tell) the perfect combo of weight, width, and rolling resistance. They're basically an Explorer on Steroids. The problem? Well, they handle rocks and roots pretty well at low pressures (30 psi f/R , I weigh 160-165 riding a 4" travel bike) but they bounce a little much, clog a bit, and , in my case, the treads are worn. Tried Hutch Spyders from Performance and I returned em after 5 miles at Walnut: Pinged off of everything. then I bought a set of Tioga DHs for kicks, but realized afterwards I couldn't possibly run 1100 gram tires.
Today I picked up a Sturdy to go with the Blade I picked up from Performance last week. Apparently this giant tire has become the choice weapon for our region. Paul at Performance swears by em -- as do alot of others. They weigh a bit more than the Verts, but they apparently can handle ridiculously low pressures and still roll quite fast for the size. Time will tell of course, but I think I just may have found THE tire.

the Explorers are nice enough around here, but once you try a Vertical you'll realize the little weight saved with the Explorer just isn't worth it given all our roots and rocks here in Va. I find the explorers as well as the Verts tend to spin out on climbs. That could be due to poor technique, but I tend to thing the time honoured paddle-tread style rear tires are just better climbers. The Verts wear pretty well, but I got my pair of Geax for almost the same price as I paid for one Vert, and they handle lower pressures AND apparently last forever. Judging by the Sturdy on my Clyde friend's single speed, I'd say the name fits. the only problem I see is that my bike gained 1/2 pound, but it isn't a race bike to begin with.

I'll keep ya posted regarding my experience after I get some time on these.

feel the gin

ickyickyptngzutboing said:
Thanks for all the help--I stopped by a LBS and asked what they recommended for the area. For non-racing I was told that a lot of people around here use the Continental Explorer Pro. So I bought a pair from him and testing them out--see how they hold up. So far alright--but the frickin' floor pump I have decided that its pressure gauge should stop working--so I'm not sure what PSI I'm running right now (inflated the tire by feel).

Right now, the spring here has been rather dry (C'ville, VA) so I haven't had a chance to run them in wet conditions. However, I've been doing a lot of riding on very rooty and rocky terrain. I think the front tire needs to lose some air pressure (again, I'm not sure what I'm at) because it's slipping a little too much in the turns I beleive. Also, I'm not content with how the tires are holding up when going up hills with a lot of roots; I feel that I'm spinning out too much--but, I assume that this as well can be associated with the tire pressure? Will reducing the tire pressure in the rear give me more traction?

Ahhhh!!!! Virginia why do you have to have such varying trail conditions???!!!! Sloppy mud/clay directly to the east of town and rocky and rooty fairly dry singletrack to the west!!!

I'll be sure to keep everyone informed if I ever find the perfect tire...
 
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