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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there...I (re)discovered some old bikes that were lying around the yard. I am wondering what it would take to get them nice again. They aren't in too bad of shape. A lot of rust, in serious need of new tires/spokes but the other components don't look that bad. Here is the link to some pix. http://www.flickr.com/photos/trail_mynx/
I have more if any of you are interested. These are the basic photos to give you an idea of what condition the bikes are in. Any info would be helpful (other than call the scrap metal dealer!!) I really think they can be saved with a little elbow grease and know-how. :D

Mynx
 

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Those are some cool old bikes. I especially like the Sears Ladies Cruiser. I have an old Raleigh mens cruiser of a similar vintage.

If it were me, I'd restore the bikes just enough to get them running smooth. I like the vintage/antique look.

Those old chains can usually be restored with a wire wheel, some oil and ALOT of patience or you could just buy a new chain.

The 3 speed hubs have an internal oil bath. They use a medium weight oil, but the stuff in there has probably thickened over the years. Put in some light weight oil like 3 in 1 and ride it for a while to loosen up the internals, then drain and refill with medium weight oil such as 10w-30 motor oil. The hub should have a hole with a cap between the flanges for the oil.

The tires may or may not be usable. Fill them with about 35 psi, spin the wheel and check for any lumps or ripped casing threads. If they don't hold air at all, you might be able to just change the tubes and keep the tires.

If the bike has rim brakes, the brake pads will usually be hardened and won't grip the rims well. You can remove the pads and grind off the outer hard layer of rubber by hand by running them back and forth on a smooth piece of cement. The rubber that gets exposed should be softer.

The bearings (headset, bottom bracket, hubs) may need new grease. If they spin smooth and quiet, I wouldn't bother messing with them. If they're rough or noisey, they should have new grease packed in.

Should be a fun project. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
grawbass said:
Those are some cool old bikes. I especially like the Sears Ladies Cruiser. I have an old Raleigh mens cruiser of a similar vintage.

If it were me, I'd restore the bikes just enough to get them running smooth. I like the vintage/antique look.

Those old chains can usually be restored with a wire wheel, some oil and ALOT of patience or you could just buy a new chain.

The 3 speed hubs have an internal oil bath. They use a medium weight oil, but the stuff in there has probably thickened over the years. Put in some light weight oil like 3 in 1 and ride it for a while to loosen up the internals, then drain and refill with medium weight oil such as 10w-30 motor oil. The hub should have a hole with a cap between the flanges for the oil.

The tires may or may not be usable. Fill them with about 35 psi, spin the wheel and check for any lumps or ripped casing threads. If they don't hold air at all, you might be able to just change the tubes and keep the tires.

If the bike has rim brakes, the brake pads will usually be hardened and won't grip the rims well. You can remove the pads and grind off the outer hard layer of rubber by hand by running them back and forth on a smooth piece of cement. The rubber that gets exposed should be softer.

The bearings (headset, bottom bracket, hubs) may need new grease. If they spin smooth and quiet, I wouldn't bother messing with them. If they're rough or noisey, they should have new grease packed in.

Should be a fun project. :)
Thanks for the info! Yes, this should be a fun project. :d I'm going to try and remove all the components, sand down the frame and get the rust off the chain, cranks, etc. I am planning on repainting the frames. I know a guy that does some great detail work and if I hand him the frame/pieces I want painted all sanded and primed it shouldn't cost me that much. Hell, if I had

I think for the most part everything is salvageable on the bikes, except for the tires. They are too far gone with dry rot. When I moved them down to the yard, the rubber was coming off in strips. Ant colonies had made their home in between the tube and tire on all three bikes. Resourceful lil creatures!!!

I definitely have my work cut out for me but at least I will be busy over the winter months...staying in touch with a bike :thumbsup:
 

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Any progress on the restoration?
 
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