Let Mikey do it!

Such may be the mantra of riders as they decide who's gonna huck the 30-foot cliff jump first. Is it too short, too long, too lippy? How does one muster up enough marbles to test a Rampage feature?

This is the interesting drama of Redbull Rampage as it is now a one-day event but a two-week process of digging, practicing and gearing up one's mental game for this nutty event.

It's a bit of a party too as athletes bring their crews to help them create the lines that they envision for the contest.

The dig chronicles are here.

The course is effectively made by the riders. A designated start and finish line is marked out by organizers, and the competitors have four days and the use of two shovel-wielders each - but no power tools - to create a stunning and challenging course in between the two points.

The course has a vertical drop of 237 meters (780 feet) with often strong winds to contend with and no tree line to block out the elements. Winds are often the wild card that can totally ruin the schedule or a run.



Reed Boggs competes at Red Bull Rampage in Virgin, Utah on October 26, 2018 // Paris Gore / Red Bull Content Pool // AP-1XAYTSAMH2111 // Usage for editorial use only //​

Last year, the event was won by Canadian Brett Rheeder, who produced a flawless run down the course near the Zion National Park, where it relocated to last year.

The event is coming this weekend, Oct 25-27, 2019