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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My valve is leaking at the tape on the inside of the rim. Tried to re mount the valve thee times. Tape is good everywhere but the valve. When the tape gets here can I just patch it, or just pull it all off start from scratch? Just short of 500 miles, and it won’t hold air over night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tape arrived today. Took the tire off and washed off the rim and inside of the tire. Re taped the wheel, with a tube to seat the tape at 45 lbs. Dismounted the tire/tube replaced the tire and valve stem. Tape was good. Inflated back to 45 lbs without sealant. Sprayed the valve stem with soapy water. Same.Damn.Leak. I think it’s the valve seat inside the rim. Can’t see any cracks in the rim. Guess I’ll try new valves. These were WTB rims, tape, and valves. Went from 45 pounds to 35 in an hour.
 

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Are you poking a clean hole? A hot poker works real nice.

At any rate I'd add sealant and give it a go, it's not uncommon for a new tubeless setup to leak a little at first and sealant will usually take care of any small imperfections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah it was clean. I did fill it with sealant, but it still leaks at the valve stem. Went for a couple of miles around the block. Nothing changed. I added a second 6” layer just like it came set up from new. Hand tightened the nut. Front wheel is fine. I converted to tubeless about a year ago.
 

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Leaks from the stem are usually from another place -depending how bad the leak is.
Yes, air can seep behind the valve on the taped side and sealant should cure that but if air is coming out quickly I'd check your edges again.

One of my wheels right now has 4 or 5 patches. Tape over tape, and it works fine. I also added sealant last week, only to hear air hiss out of the stem. Broke the bead again and found one of the spoke holes was damaged. How the heck -who knows. Anyway, I wiped it with a towel and plopped down a piece of tape over the surface and good. I didn't even bother cleaning the tape and I'd used new sealant just 10 minutes earlier. The tape stuck well enough to seal. Maybe 2" long is all it was. I had a broken spoke in that wheel probably a year ago -the shop also taped over their repair (this was a different hole).

I've had issues getting the Specialized valve to seal more than once -the o-ring seal style. One wheel just would not seal while the other wheel did. I eventually replaced both valves and one of those are my spare in my pack. The tape in the wheel with patches is maybe as much as 2 years old now. Maybe the 3rd tire and bead broken a few times to add sealant for each tire.
I may retape it when this tire is worn out, it's at least 50% but I'm a miser when it comes to new tires so it will be a while longer before I change. I live in a drought so probably won't be getting a new tire until there is new traction around here.
 

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Pro tip-cut the Presta (removable-core) valve off an old tube to use as your tubeless valve. Leave a a little rectangle of rubber at its base narrow enough to fit in the rim channel but long enough to make a nice seal. Usually works pretty good for stubborn valve leaks, at least give it a try before retaping the rim.Could depend on the tube brand. still use the larger nut from the tubeless valve, tighten with pliers.
 

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Pro tip-cut the Presta (removable-core) valve off an old tube to use as your tubeless valve. Leave a a little rectangle of rubber at its base narrow enough to fit in the rim channel but long enough to make a nice seal. Usually works pretty good for stubborn valve leaks, at least give it a try before retaping the rim.Could depend on the tube brand. still use the larger nut from the tubeless valve, tighten with pliers.
I haven't ever seen a pro try that method but regardless I can't see how it could work better than a tubeless Stan's valve, or even as good. Stan's has a tapered rubber base that works awesome, and you should never have to tighten it with pliers. As I (and Arm& Hammer) mentioned it's important to push it in tight when tightening the locknut.
 
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