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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone still even have a mtb with V brakes? Anyway, I was looking at my V brake pads this morning and noticed that my right rear pad was dramatically more worn down than the other three pads. I also noticed that this right rear pad was closer to the rim than the left rear pad, so I then used the spring adjuster screws to equal up the distance from pads to rim.

Was the fact that this right rear pad was closer to the rim than the left one the likely cause of the right pad being dramatically more worn down than the other three pads? The pads on the front V brake were roughly equal distance from the rims.
 

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Hmm, It could be as you say..

Or it could be that the rear wheel is or has been slightly out of true, and has been rubbing down that pad.

Try releasing the cable so the pads hang loose and spinning the wheel to see if its straight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I just went back in the garage and checked the rim for trueness, It looked pretty darn true. Then I fiddled with V brake arms some more and could not seem to get proper tension. I ended up pulling both rear arms off and cleaning and lubing all the pivot points.

It now appears to me that the spring on the right side with the heavily worn pad is broken. On the left arm, I can move all the pivot points simply by pressing the long, 3.25" spring-arm-rod down against the stop, and it will automatically spring back itself, moving all the pivot parts as it moves. On the right arm, that same 3.25 inch spring-arm-rod doesn't do anything. I can just lay it against the stop and it creates no tension to spring back. If I move it back away from the stop manually, it still doesn't make anything pivot.

If I pivot the pad holder itself on this right side instead of the rod, it makes kind of a half hearted spring back, but not with nearly as much force as doing the same thing with the pad holder on the left side does.

So I suspect that my right side spring mechanism is broken at the main cylinder somewhere, and the right pad has simply not been springing away properly. Maybe that is why the right rear pad is so much more worn than all the other pads.

Maybe I have to replace the rear V brake arms, and if they only come in a set of four, replace both front and back V brakes? Any recommendations?
 

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Just a side thought. I like to use soft compound pads with my rim brakes.Less abrasion means longer life for rims.I'd rather wear out pads than rims.(unless you need to make hard stops) Try Kool stop or Ritchey red pads. :thumbsup:
 

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johnstone3 said:
I just went back in the garage and checked the rim for trueness, It looked pretty darn true. Then I fiddled with V brake arms some more and could not seem to get proper tension. I ended up pulling both rear arms off and cleaning and lubing all the pivot points.

It now appears to me that the spring on the right side with the heavily worn pad is broken. On the left arm, I can move all the pivot points simply by pressing the long, 3.25" spring-arm-rod down against the stop, and it will automatically spring back itself, moving all the pivot parts as it moves. On the right arm, that same 3.25 inch spring-arm-rod doesn't do anything. I can just lay it against the stop and it creates no tension to spring back. If I move it back away from the stop manually, it still doesn't make anything pivot.

If I pivot the pad holder itself on this right side instead of the rod, it makes kind of a half hearted spring back, but not with nearly as much force as doing the same thing with the pad holder on the left side does.

So I suspect that my right side spring mechanism is broken at the main cylinder somewhere, and the right pad has simply not been springing away properly. Maybe that is why the right rear pad is so much more worn than all the other pads.

Maybe I have to replace the rear V brake arms, and if they only come in a set of four, replace both front and back V brakes? Any recommendations?
I'd suspect that you could bring that spring back to life with a little creative bending but hard to show you over the internet. If the brake is indeed shot I'd go with an Avid or Shimano replacement, shouldn't be too expensive and you can buy rears separately from the fronts if you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Bikinfoolferlife said:
I'd suspect that you could bring that spring back to life with a little creative bending but hard to show you over the internet. If the brake is indeed shot I'd go with an Avid or Shimano replacement, shouldn't be too expensive and you can buy rears separately from the fronts if you want.
I took the V brake arms in a plastic bag to a bike shop, thinking maybe the right arm could be salvaged, and the mechanic convinced me that it didn't matter that there was no pressure on that spring rod when the arm wasn't pinned on the bike. So I put my new Kool Stop pads in the holders and started over, fiddling and futzing until now I seem to have good, proper tension, the pads are centered, they hit the rim at the same time, and life is good. When the arms were off the bike, I made sure the spring tension screws were in a little over half way to begin with, before putting the arms back on and making further centering adjustments. This helped by making sure I was centering the springs around a good solid spring tension to begin with. Thanks for all the replies.
 
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