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Discussion Starter #41
You are "very" weird in the way you think. Narrow minded and not very resourceful. I know people like you and refuse to deal with them in any facet of life.
Wow. I get I have a certain slant on used bike prices, but that was a bit of a broad stroke for not knowing me at all. Maybe ask some questions about me and try to learn more about my character before you cast a final judgement? I'm trying to understand what sellers might be thinking; I'm not completely writing them off as sociopaths.
 

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I'm trying to get a grasp on what sort of rationale sellers are using.
I was tempted to TLDR your rambling comments & rhetorical questions but saw every paragraph through in curious amazement.

I’m as dumbfounded by your inability to grasp the basic concepts of supply & demand and free enterprise as you apparently are at my / our inability to share your belief in / wish for a controlled market.

I don’t believe the realities of this subject can be explained more simply than has already been done within this thread.

If everyone tells you the sky is blue, then it’s probably actually blue.
=sParty
 

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I'm of the mind that anything with the old 135/100 spacing with quick release skewers and a straight steer tube should be asking somewhere between 1200-1400 max with the expectation they'll have to be haggled down to 1000, give or take on parts and condition, of course. That would be for the cream of the crop models or bikes with nice upgrades hanging on them too; stock bikes that were low end to start should be lower.

Bikes that have 26 inch wheels should never be priced above a grand, and should be asking somewhere around 600-700 to start only if they were amazingly awesome in the first place. A run of the mill 26 inch bike should cost no more than 300-400 at best, and that would have to be in tip top shape for the age.

A hardtail should naturally cost less than a full suspension, but it seems people feel they can charge more because "it's crazy light and you can win races on this".

These older bikes all have years and years of use on them... I just don't see the logic in asking so much. I'll never understand the mentality a seller has when they price a bike. I can get asking more at first because you have to haggle with buyers, but when they ask high and don't budge, it makes no sense at all.

Does anyone else feel the same or am I just weird?
You only see asking prices, not transaction prices. I even think your suggested prices are too high. You could get a new HT from CRC for $1K and it will be better in all aspects than an old 26". the 26" will have outdated geometry, straight steerer, QR, 2x or even 3x etc. To me a 26" is maybe a large children bike, or a commuter bike if you don't have secure storage at work. No way I ever would pay $700 for such bike. but thsi is jsut me, i assume someone sees a " value" in an outdated bike.

Sellers have weird reasonings for setting aprice. the " need" a certain amount or many yeas ago paid a certain amount for that bike. N
 

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Wow. I get I have a certain slant on used bike prices, but that was a bit of a broad stroke for not knowing me at all. Maybe ask some questions about me and try to learn more about my character before you cast a final judgement? I'm trying to understand what sellers might be thinking; I'm not completely writing them off as sociopaths.
Sorry. You're house example pretty much summed up your train of thought. As for bikes every generation of bikes from prewar to the end of modern 26ers has huge worldwide followings and parts are readily available. For a lot of people it's about the passion of riding and restoring older bikes. For others, who want to just get some exercise along a path on something other than a wallyworld bike, there's bikes out there too, but they're competing with those that have been cooped up and are looking for projects, whether for themselves, or to restore and sell for side cash. Even if they're entry level bikes from the 90's.
 

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I don’t believe the realities of this subject can be explained more simply than has already been done within this thread.
=sParty
I'm quoting myself because I thought of something else but didn't want to edit my previous post. Something germane that may not have already been mentioned.

Market timing.

I'm no market expert, but we know that in free enterprise markets, the value of things (real estate, gold, bicycles -- anything) goes up and down. Sometimes it's a seller's market, sometimes it's a buyer's market. Supply & demand play perhaps most heavily on this but there are other factors at work (employment levels, world economy, competition, inflation, pandemic :oops:, etc.)

Used bikes are highly valued RIGHT NOW.

But this too shall pass.

Sellers are simply taking their turn. In time, conditions will change and it'll likely become a buyer's market once the glut of overproduction comes on the tail of the current beast.

Don't want to buy a bike during a seller's market? The choice is simple: don't buy one now. There will always be winners & losers in a free market. Sometimes it's the seller, sometimes it's the buyer. Right now it's the buyer. Tough luck. Hope this helps.
=sParty
 

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If the components are good spec, a seller can likely make more money parting out a "dated" 26" bike. For exmaple, I do dirt jumping and while some newer frames have 142 hubs and tapered steer tubes, many still use 135 and straight head tubes. And none use "Boost." It's hard to source good parts for them.
 

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I'm quoting myself because I thought of something else but didn't want to edit my previous post. Something germane that may not have already been mentioned.

Market timing.

I'm no market expert, but we know that in free enterprise markets, the value of things (real estate, gold, bicycles -- anything) goes up and down. Sometimes it's a seller's market, sometimes it's a buyer's market. Supply & demand play perhaps most heavily on this but there are other factors at work (employment levels, world economy, competition, inflation, pandemic :oops:, etc.)

Used bikes are highly valued RIGHT NOW.

But this too shall pass.

Sellers are simply taking their turn. In time, conditions will change and it'll likely become a buyer's market once the glut of overproduction comes on the tail of the current beast.

Don't want to buy a bike during a seller's market? The choice is simple: don't buy one now. There will always be winners & losers in a free market. Sometimes it's the seller, sometimes it's the buyer. Right now it's the buyer. Tough luck. Hope this helps.
=sParty
Just last night I watched a documentary that had a piece about the tulip bubble in Holland. Three orphans took their late father's bulbs down to the market and with dumb luck were instant millionaires. Others' timing was off, held on and were left holding the bag. One, a famous Dutch painter had to sell his works for years to get out of debt.
 

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Again, maybe I'm just weird in the way I think, and I'm trying to get a grasp on what sort of rationale sellers are using.
You are speaking from a place of notable privilege on this. you're not who sellers are trying to sell to. they want to sell to people who will spend more money on what they have. and those people are generally those who don't have a bike at all and don't want to wait an unknown number of months (or more) to get their hands on something. and they don't want to spend however much it takes to buy one of the bikes that's sitting on a sales floor right now.

So there's some wiggle in the classes of lower priced bikes that have been in high demand, where sellers can get more for what they've got.
 

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I am getting the sense that the OP does not like used bikes. Just a hunch.
 

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I bought a Specialized Enduro Pro brand new back in 2002, it was bike of the year in one of the magazines of the day. Rode it 12 years and sold it for $600. This was a few years ago, before the supply and demand was all wonky.

I had plenty of low ball offers, people telling me I was crazy, it would never sell, etc. But I had a place to store it and was in no rush for the cash. I got the price I wanted eventually, it was for sale for 3 months.

You will either find a buyer who sees the value at the price you are asking, or you wont.
 

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If the components are good spec, a seller can likely make more money parting out a "dated" 26" bike. For exmaple, I do dirt jumping and while some newer frames have 142 hubs and tapered steer tubes, many still use 135 and straight head tubes. And none use "Boost." It's hard to source good parts for them.
For sure. Or just by digging through the junk pile.

I've got v-brake levers laying around that I've seen sell for a couple hundred dollars, for example, in addition to a bunch of other 'retro' parts.
 

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I don’t understand why so many people are challenged to understand or accept this reality. It seems obvious.
There's another law, related to supply and demand, oft forgotten, but frequently applied:
Inherent in the supply/demand curve, is the set of buyers left of the equilibrium who think the price is too high. These buyers would like the price to be less. I'm not sure why this price delta signal appears to convert buyers into regulators, but it does. Probably hubris.

There will always be winners & losers in a free market. Sometimes it's the seller, sometimes it's the buyer. Right now it's the buyer. Tough luck. Hope this helps.
I think you're over applying zero sum thinking in market economies. Barring external forces, free trade is mutually beneficial, meaning that both buyer and seller are better off for the trade. Where this falls apart is when either the buyer or seller is over leveraged in their position, which causes them to concede on something. That said, the entirety of the price calculus is internal to each party, so barring a third party gun to the head, the transaction is still mutually beneficial, even if one or both of the parties chooses to perceive it as predatory afterward.
 

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For sure. Or just by digging through the junk pile.

I've got v-brake levers laying around that I've seen sell for a couple hundred dollars, for example, in addition to a bunch of other 'retro' parts.
My single speed has Altek levers and Avid Black Ops Vs. Ot also has ceramic rims, Ti spokes and Kings. If I put that package up and said I'd ship to Europe, I'd easily pocket a grand.
 

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My single speed has Altek levers and Avid Black Ops Vs. Ot also has ceramic rims, Ti spokes and Kings. If I put that package up and said I'd ship to Europe, I'd easily pocket a grand.
I've got the Black Ops SD levers. Wish I could find the matching brakes - probably buried deeper in the shitpile. :)
 

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I had two pair of Avid SD Ultimate levers at one time -- a silver pair and a black pair. Never should have let those go.
=sParty
 

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I had two pair of Avid SD Ultimate levers at one time -- a silver pair and a black pair. Never should have let those go.
=sParty
They are sweet as hell.
I've got an older RM Blizzard that they're probably going to find their way onto.
 

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Man, I totally despise selling my used gear via Craigslist, FB Marketplace, or any other online ad. The worst is when I get an email from someone who had no intention of buying just to say, "You'll never get that much" or "That price is too high." No s*** you genius. I expect the buyer to counteroffer a lower price. Why would I lowball myself right off the bat??? When I ask them, "How much would you like offer?" I get no reply back. They just felt like sharing their esteemed opinion.

I would rather throw my old stuff away than deal with randos. Thankfully we have a sporting goods consignment shop nearby where I drop off my unwanted stuff and let them sell it. I might lose out on 30% - 100% of the money but then I don't have weirdos to deal with.
 

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The house analogy. If the homes were in such bad shape and needed so much rehab, I would think the smart money would be better spent on something somewhere else in a lower priced area, or even renting. What's the point on purchasing something that instantly needs so much work unless you are so well off you have stacks of Benjamins with which to wipe your arse, especially when it's just a high priced turd? I'd rather own something of quality, even if it meant living in a different area, and if I couldn't afford to own, I'd rent.
I'm not sure who brought it up but houses maybe aren't a great analogy because market forces are different than bikes. You could buy a run-down house in a great area, fix it up or maybe even demolish and build a new one on it, and have the final result be worth way more over time. Bikes never appreciate like real estate can. You might buy less house for the money in order to be closer to your job so you don't have to sit in traffic 3 hours per day. You might buy less house for the money because it's next to a ton of biking, skiing, lakes, etc. rather than in the middle of nowhere where there's nothing to do other than get drunk and roll coal (i.e., better quality of life).

Renting is money out the window.

Do you rent or own?
 

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Man, I totally despise selling my used gear via Craigslist, FB Marketplace, or any other online ad. The worst is when I get an email from someone who had no intention of buying just to say, "You'll never get that much" or "That price is too high." No s*** you genius. I expect the buyer to counteroffer a lower price. Why would I lowball myself right off the bat??? When I ask them, "How much would you like offer?" I get no reply back. They just felt like sharing their esteemed opinion.

I would rather throw my old stuff away than deal with randos. Thankfully we have a sporting goods consignment shop nearby where I drop off my unwanted stuff and let them sell it. I might lose out on 30% - 100% of the money but then I don't have weirdos to deal with.
I recently had a dude ask “What’s the lowest price you’d take it for?”

I think the only answer is $100 more than before, for you.
 
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