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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am from Canada. I wonder if I visit US for bike vacation, will the national parks, uncle SAM, charge me extra fee for using bike trails ? I heard that US park service has raise entrance fee 2yrs ago. I am not absolutely sure about this news. My memory is fuzzy. Is this fee for camping in the park ? Does it affect bikers using the trail too ?
 

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Shiggy's right tho, if you want to ride you might look at other areas; very few NP's allow bikes on trails. Hikers yes, but not bikes. Unless you count "bike paths' like around the Yosemite Valley. Most of the good riding is on other public land like BLM or Forest Serivice.

formica
 

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formica said:
Shiggy's right tho, if you want to ride you might look at other areas; very few NP's allow bikes on trails. Hikers yes, but not bikes. Unless you count "bike paths' like around the Yosemite Valley. Most of the good riding is on other public land like BLM or Forest Serivice.

formica
This is true. No bikes allowed in National *Parks*. However, National *Forests* are a different story entirely. Just want to make sure the original poster didn't mistakely inter-mingle the 2 entities. Bike to your hearts content in most national forests. Some do require a day use fee, but it's nominal and shouldn't cramp your vacation budget. I believe currently (at least here in Central Oregon... but I think it may be more widespread) the day use fees are temporarily on hold until the government can come to terms on parameters for how the fees will be deterimined and utilized.

Also, if you plan to visit National Parks and have a dog, remember that National Parks don't allow dogs on trails (there are a few exceptions... but even those are very limited). We found that one out the hard way during a road trip last year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
national forest located inside national park

SLinBend said:
This is true. No bikes allowed in National *Parks*. However, National *Forests* are a different story entirely. Just want to make sure the original poster didn't mistakely inter-mingle the 2 entities. Bike to your hearts content in most national forests. Some do require a day use fee, but it's nominal and shouldn't cramp your vacation budget. I believe currently (at least here in Central Oregon... but I think it may be more widespread) the day use fees are temporarily on hold until the government can come to terms on parameters for how the fees will be deterimined and utilized.

Also, if you plan to visit National Parks and have a dog, remember that National Parks don't allow dogs on trails (there are a few exceptions... but even those are very limited). We found that one out the hard way during a road trip last year.
Isn't national forest located inside National park?
 

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Picard said:
Isn't national forest located inside National park?
Not really. The Parks are more localized and more protected than the forests. The forests cover way more territory, way more spread out, and have little or no access fees.

http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/arnf/

This is the Nat'l Forest near me in Colorado: No access fees, huge area, tons of trails. Good stuff!
 

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Picard said:
ok. I understand now. It is different in the states.
not much. I vacation a lot up in BC and it's like this:
National Park = National Park
Provincial Park= State Park,
Proivincial Forest = National Forest. All, more or less.
I camp a lot in Provincial forests, and its very similar. There are fee sites, and then you can get further out and camp primitive style. The only differences are that in BC you always get free firewood at a forest site, and the Canadian Forest roads are a whole lot better.

formica
 
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