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noMAD man
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Mount it how? I'll assume you mean can it be mounted in any position...upside down, forward, backward, etc. Yes, as long as you insure that there is no contact with the shock by any part of the bike throughout the shock stroke, you can mount the shock any way you want. Also make sure you can get to all the controls easily...adjustment knobs, air chambers, etc. Also be aware that you can rotate the shock body ends 180 degrees from each other if that helps fitment to the frame or access to the controls.
 

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Clutchman83 said:
A shock works the same no matter how you mount it. TNC said it best.
While it will function, it's most often best to reduce unsprung weight.

Also if at all possible, mount it with the shaft down. This minimizes the amount of dirt that accumulates around and gets driven into the seals.

PK
 

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noMAD man
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PMK, I've thought about the unsprung weight concept on shock position, but in a real sense I can't imagine this having any critical impact. Plus in my fuzzy imagination, I'm thinking some suspension designs will not be affected either way. There's also a concept of reducing the center-of-gravity a bit by shock position, but once again this is going to be fairly miniscule IMO.

On the cleanliness of the shock shaft caused by shock position, there are actually some designs that may benefit from having the shaft facing up or forward...or at least no detrimental result of doing so. Shocks that are mounted under and close to the top tube are probably not going to notice much negative influence from crud on the shaft. Some shocks mounted in swinglinks or other systems close to the rear tire might actually be shielded a bit by the head of the shock body. Regardless it may all be somewhat of a minutia discussion.
 

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Just posting some typical guidelines.

For me, experiences rebuilding both coil over and air sprung dampers find both types will become contaminated with fine dust in the seals. More often the ones needing more frequent service live in a seal up environment.

Unsprung weight, is likely a moot concern with these large rod, mini dampers used on mtb applications. Larger dampers as used on motorcycles or performance vehicles can see a definite change. Can a rider feel the change, some better test riders will, but the average rider gets on and goes. Feel unsprung weight, many can't feel the end limits of a rebound adjuster.

As I said, just typical guidelines, nothing more.

PK
 
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