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Anybody tired of seeing "Monocog 29er" in a title? Anyone? :D

My geared 26" full suspension bike has been neglected for some time now, so I'm thinking about sending it to a good home and having my MC29er as my one bike. I'd like to get a flip flop free/free hub and run the option of 32x19 and 32x21 or 22 when the going really gets gnarly. Instead of building the existing rim and spokes around a new hub, I would sell my current wheelset on the 'bay to fund a new wheelset. Had my eyes on this set right here:

http://www.webcyclery.com/product.php?productid=17740&cat=404&page=1

Besides tending to my flip/flop needs, would this wheelset be a good upgrade from my current (redling hubs w/ alex DH19 rims) setup? I've never really heard anything bad or good about the surly hubs.

Also, my price limit is $300, or right around that. So save your I9 mumbo jumbo for another thread that doesn't involve a $500 bike. :nono: :D

Any insight would be helpful. Thanks!
 

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old man riding!
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I did the same thing almost.. I got rid of my other bike and MC is my one and only and I love it.. I did change the wheelset for Delgado disc wheels and some xt hubs and I really like them.Are you going to run discs or keep the v-brakes?
 

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old man riding!
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Hey thanks ! I got the wheelset off ebay from one of our 29er brethren fastfreddie for I think 250.00 buy it now price. There are plenty to choose from on ebay though and the rampages are great..thanks
 

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The Surly hubs are pretty good IMO. Especially for the price. A little heavy, but tough, with decent bearings. My advice, since you are sticking with V brakes, would be to get the widest flange spacing for the dollar, and the Surlys surely fit that scheme. The Paul word rear hub is a great SUPER wide, super light, non-disc hub, but much more expensive (and not flip/flop).
 

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Big Paws on a Puppy!!
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KeylessChuck said:
The Surly hubs are pretty good IMO. Especially for the price. A little heavy, but tough, with decent bearings. My advice, since you are sticking with V brakes, would be to get the widest flange spacing for the dollar, and the Surlys surely fit that scheme. The Paul word rear hub is a great SUPER wide, super light, non-disc hub, but much more expensive (and not flip/flop).
Can you please expand on your comments for the noobie's out there in MTBR.com land like myself. Specifically why is the wide flange spacing important?

By the way, thanks for the post. It's actually posts like this that help me to understand the physics and mechanics behind my own bike. Plus, I embrace any chance I can to learn something new.

:thumbsup:
 

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No problem Ratman!

An analogy that comes to mind is that of a radio tower with cable supports. If a tower's supports are anchored near the base of the tower, so the wires are nearly parallel to the tower, the tower will easily sway in the wind. If the wires are anchored away from the base so that wires form more of an angle to the tower, the tower becomes more stable.

29er wheels are a little weaker than an exact replica in a 26" wheel, becuase the rims are supported by spokes pulling at it from either side at a shallower angle.

Those with single speed, non-disc brake hubs can build a stronger wheel (or adequately strong light wheel) because there is no multi speed cassette or disc brake bosses taking up room along the lenght of the hub. The farther apart the flanges, the farther apart the tower wire anchors.

Or sumthin...
Maybe one of the other members would be better at explaining this?
 

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Reviewer/Tester
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It's simply like standing with your feet together and letting someone push you ... you are easy to push over sideways.:eek:

Spread those feet apart and it's a LOT harder to push you over.. :D


R.
 

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Big Paws on a Puppy!!
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KeylessChuck said:
No problem Ratman!

An analogy that comes to mind is that of a radio tower with cable supports. If a tower's supports are anchored near the base of the tower, so the wires are nearly parallel to the tower, the tower will easily sway in the wind. If the wires are anchored away from the base so that wires form more of an angle to the tower, the tower becomes more stable.

29er wheels are a little weaker than an exact replica in a 26" wheel, becuase the rims are supported by spokes pulling at it from either side at a shallower angle.

Those with single speed, non-disc brake hubs can build a stronger wheel (or adequately strong light wheel) because there is no multi speed cassette or disc brake bosses taking up room along the lenght of the hub. The farther apart the flanges, the farther apart the tower wire anchors.

Or sumthin...
Maybe one of the other members would be better at explaining this?
Rainman said:
It's simply like standing with your feet together and letting someone push you ... you are easy to push over sideways.:eek:

Spread those feet apart and it's a LOT harder to push you over.. :D

R.
Thanks guys!!!

Makes sense to me now. I'm not ashamed to admit that I learned something new about my bike today.

:thumbsup:
 

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I have built with and used Surly hubs for many years. Pretty bomb proof. Honestly, if Surly marketed a freehub rear, I would run them on all of my bikes.

Along with hub flange spacing, there are two other considerations in determining the lateral stability of a wheel (of any diameter)

The amount of spokes (the more the merrier). Given the same sizing parameters, a 36 spoke wheel will be more stable than a 32.

The length of the spokes. Not a lot you can do there, other than choose the largest diamieter hub flanges and the smallest ERD rims.

Good luck to you. A great wheelset can make the difference between a so-so bike and one that you'll want to ride daily.
 
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