Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to go about upgrading the stem of my '09 Specialized Rockhopper and was wondering what I'd have to be weary of when getting a new one. Does anyone happen to know offhand what the stem length is on this particular bike?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
974 Posts
If you like the way if feels now, just make sure you get the same length and rise. You should be able to just measure it. But I'm not sure if you measure the entire length or from center of stack to center of bar. I think its center to center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
From the little bit of research I've done it looks like it is center to center... let's say I do like the way it feels now and the new stem is off by one degree and shorter than the current stem. Would it still be possible to replicate the same feel if they are not off by too much if I were to move the handlebars and seat to compensate?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
974 Posts
I'm going to disagree. Moving the seat will make the distance the same, but will change your angle of attack and your alignment with the BB. It may cause you some knee pain. I think you will be fine with measurements. I like easton stems. The ea 50 is nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,061 Posts
dimm0k said:
I'd like to go about upgrading the stem of my '09 Specialized Rockhopper and was wondering what I'd have to be weary of when getting a new one. Does anyone happen to know offhand what the stem length is on this particular bike?
Measure it. It's not uncommon for different sized bikes to be outfitted with different length stems, so it's doubtful that anyone here can say for certain what size stem you have on your bike.

Given that you seem to be happy with your body position on the bike, it's not clear to me why you want to upgrade the stem. Bling? Weight savings? Rather than upgrading the stem, I'd put the money towards something which will appreciably affect the quality of the ride or handling, e.g., brakes, fork, or wheels. If you do decide to upgrade the stem, you should consider experimenting with a slightly longer or shorter stem to see if that makes a difference in your riding.
 

·
Old man on a bike
Joined
·
12,384 Posts
Wow, you want to "upgrade" your stem yet don't even know what you've got? Crazy.

Not much to be gained by changing a stem unless you need something from the change, i.e. a different length or different rise. As long as the stem is currently doing it's job (does it grip the steerer and bar well?) and you like the way it fits, why change it?

No, you don't change seat position for stem length unless there's other fit issues you're trying to solve and realize what those changes are about. You might be able to change bars or move your bars to match the feel of your current setup, but then what's the point if you're just going to end back up where you started?

Spend your money on stuff that counts for something, stem is one of the last things to consider...unless you're a weight weenie then you're on the wrong bike to begin with...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Not much to be gained by changing a stem unless you need something from the change, i.e. a different length or different rise. As long as the stem is currently doing it's job (does it grip the steerer and bar well?) and you like the way it fits, why change it?
What is the reason for changing the stem...? i don't see the point unless it is solving something... but then maybe i am missing something. If you just like the look a a newer stem then i guess that's a reason...
 

·
responsible zombie owner
Joined
·
654 Posts
+1 for why change a stem that fits you.

My 6500 was killing my wrists/nerves so I bought a wider, high-rise handlebar with 31.8mm diameter, plus a shorter 0-rise stem so that I had more positions to play with. After much tinkering, adding bar ends, rotating the bars etc I have gone back to the original handlebars and stem, just made some minor adjustments to the bar angle and kept the bar ends on - voila, no pain. I now have a lovely spare handlebar and stem in a box to use should another bike cause me any issues, but there's really no pressing need to change a stem if it fits you.

Weight savings just about anywhere else will make more difference and most stem designs are just a variation on black + logo so looks don't matter much either.
 

·
I Have Cookies
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
+1 another for why......the stock stem on the 09'RH is a good solid piece I accually put one on my '06.........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the replies guys! I love this forum!

My main reason for changing the stock stem was definitely for the bling factor, however with the replies given I'm definitely gonna have to put that on hold for now. I suppose I was all caught up being a newbie to biking and wanted to juice it up too quickly.
 

·
responsible zombie owner
Joined
·
654 Posts
Nothing wrong with bling, but get bling that makes a palpable difference. I love the look of my 69er with Eggbeater SLs with the blue springs but primarily I love the way it feels to ride with them.

I also just swapped the OEM Bontrager grips for Ourys (the stock grips were nice and light but were giving me hand pain) and the change adds some aesthetic appeal, but I wouldn't have bothered if there wasn't a genuine issue I wanted to solve (besides, I had the Ourys lying around since my last bout of upgradeitis).
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top