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I’ve been looking to upgrade my bike since the lack of new back in the world today with COVID going on. I’ve pretty much updated everything minus suspension. I’ve heard the rule of 20 mm with the front fork. No more or less then existing. I have a fox float 29 120mm. I was thinking of going up to 140 mm. Is it worth it? Has anyone upgraded travel and like/ hated it?
 

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If the bike was built around 120mm, I'd say going to 140mm is likely ok. You'll likely void any warranty. Worst case is you put added stress on your frame and it breaks while you're landing a sweet jump. But more likely you'll just have to deal with a slacked out seat tube angle which could make climbing more annoying to keep the front wheel down. But the downhill capabilities should be noticeably better.
 

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Depends on what you're trying to achieve. Better downhill performance? sure, might be worth it. Your climbing performance will likely suffer, as will your slow speed handling. You might get a better result by upgrading the damper if that is possible.

Or are you just wanting something new? In that case I might suggest spending the money on an imstructor or taking a trip somewhere new rather than spending money on a bike you seem like you'll be replacing when things normalize.
 

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I've added 20-30+ mm to forks on a few bikes including XC, trail, enduro. Actually took an old hardtail from 80mm to 130 as an experiment years ago. Yup, 50mm! Still have that bike. One of the most fun bikes to play around on we've ever owned. My daughter has threatened me with bodily injury if I ever got rid of that bike. In all cases, the bikes I "lifted" felt more playful, had improved handling, and definitely made going down steep stuff more fun. I've never experienced any negative results or consequences. Of course, this is all dependent on the specific bike's design, so your mileage may vary.

Consideration... offset. If you're modifying an existing fork to increase travel, offset change is insignificant. If you're replacing a fork, pay attention to offset. In my experience, a change in offset made a much more noticeable difference than increased travel. This could be a good or bad thing.
 

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noMAD man
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OP, it might help a bit if you describe the specific bike and what kind of riding on what terrain. As several already mentioned, this can be a plus or minus depending on factors. Since starting MTB'ing in the late 90's and only riding full suspension bikes, I've just about always "over-forked". But I come from dirt motos, and I hated the lack of good, plentiful front suspension. As our longer travel bikes got to the 6+ inch travel region, it wasn't as bad to keep that amount of so-called balanced travel front and rear. Still, for the kind of riding I did and do, I wouldn't even think of riding a 120mm fork, so my vote would obviously be to go 140mm.

How you ride and position yourself on the bike makes a huge difference too. As a dirt motor guy, you get conditioned to leaning into the front wheel aggressively for corners and climbing...it's a requirement for any challenging off road. I do the same on an MTB so having a 140mm front on a 100-120mm rear never really gave me any heartburn. People are different, bikes are different, conditions are different.
 

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Will the new fork (based on A2C and increased travel) raise the handlebars 20mm? If so, you might want to start by adding 20mm of spacers, if possible, to see how you like it. If you already have 20mm of spacers, and you like that height, you can always remove them to maintain that feel with the new fork. It's possible, depending on what fork you have, that going to a new (higher end) fork at the same length with better internals would make more of a difference.
What model are you on now? FIT4 or Grip?
What model are you looking to get?
 

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Rippin da fAt
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Caster angle is being danced around and needs to be brought to the front burner...

OP, you need to consider the items that will affect caster angle at the same time as bringing the front end up.

Things that affect caster angle;

1. Axle to Crown
2. Rake or as it is also known as, offset of the fork.

Changing caster changes handling characteristics. This is noticeable with very slight changes such as .5° or 1°.

What exactly is the goal in your #1 post? Not intended as a snarky question but a serious one.
 

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I've over-forked a couple of older MTBs, a 90s hardtail (from rigid to 63mm Judy to 80mm Bomber), and a Trek Topfuel which came stock with 100/100 -- upped the fork to 120mm.

In both cases the added travel gives you a bit more plushness and more capacity over the rough stuff relative to the previous setup. I don't find that the extra travel effects handling that much, especially since you can up your static sag so that when you're on the bike the angles are actually very similar.

With older bikes lowering a 70deg HTA to 69.5 by extending the fork (I say no more than 20mm from stock) is a welcome change IMO. I just upped the travel on my new bike (SC Tallboy) by 10 mm and didn't really notice any difference other than increased plushness and better bottoming resistance.

On the other hand, a buddy of mine put a 100mm Recon on his old 90's HT (and it looks goofy AF. I imagine it rides weird as well.

That's basically a 40mm increase over the stock suspension fork -- too much IMO.
 
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