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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an older On One Scandal (2008 I believe). It's been in so many different setups and uses I've lost track (hardtail, rigid, gears, SS, fenders, etc....). I have a primary MTB and road bike, this is generally for anything in between or emergency backup duty. Currently it is setup on my trainer for Zwift duty while the weather is nice and I wanted my road bike back.

I have a rigid and 100mm sus fork.
I've got two wheelsets (Stans Arch for commuting/road/trainer and Stans Flow for dirt)

Looking to upgrade the entire drivetrain. I was running a 2 x 9 setup which had me spinning out on the road. We recently cobbled together a 3 x setup with a bunch of random mismatched parts (some not ideal for 3x). Haven't really tried it outside, but seems to works OK on Zwif. Either way it's time for an upgrade/replacement. I have a spare cassette & rotor on my 2nd wheeleset for quick swaps, so I'll plan to buy a 2nd cassette when I upgrade.

I want to start doing more gravel, but don't really think I'm going to consider swapping to a drop bar setup. I just rarely ever use the drops on my road bike, I'm on the hoods 98% of the time. This would also make conversions easier (and cheaper I guess since I'm not replacing brakes)... or should I reconsider and look at the more "adventure style" drops now... like Salsa Woodchippers or similar? I just don't know that I'd use them as I haven't tried them. Or any other bar setup suggestions?

Anyway, assuming I want to keep using this bike as a do anything bike (from road/commuting, to gravel, to light MTB'ing) I figure a 1x setup may not be ideal?

What would you do? Can a 1X setup do it all in my case...... or should I lean towards finding a good 2x11 setup? Running a front derailer won't particularly bother me. I don't want to spin out at 15mph on the road and I don't want to kill myself going uphill if using it for mountain biking.
 

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Personally, I find drop bars way easier on my hands and wrists than flat bars when road type riding. The multiple hand positions certainly help: tops, ramps, hoods, drops and in between. Using different positions on the bars also changes the angle of my back. I'll ride the mtb for hours with flat bars and it'll be find as long as it's on trails with all the relative movement between me and the bike. Ride the mtb on 4-5 miles of flat and my hands and wrist start to complain.
 

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I have a 2009 Salsa La Cruz and run a 2x10 hybrid, road compact up front with an MTB der/cass(32) in the back. It works quite well low enough gearing for climbing singletrack and no spin out on fast fireroad descents.

I use a traditional Salsa drop bar but bought the widest I could find at the time 46cm I believe. I run cross top levers cause I like to ride singletrack sometimes and prefer the tops for that so I have brakes, I'm never in the drops unless I'm descending on the road which is rare. Almost always on the hoods as well but do like the top position too. Since you ride road and are used to the drop bars I say try a pair on the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. I think I'm still leaning toward a 2X setup. Having a hard time convincing myself drops are the way to go though.... I night see what the cost difference is.
 

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I have a rigid 9er EMD set up using a 11-42 sunrace cassette, 11 spd xt RD and shifter paired with a 30T NW mounted on my existing slx cranks. Seems to work well for most of the stuff i find myself riding. So far the upgrade was pretty reasonable price wise. I never considered using a drop bar on this bike and have found that my SG jones bar was well worth the $85 i paid for it. Lots of positions to use in different conditions. And its great for using a bar bag instead of a back pack.
 

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I highly recommend the Salsa Woodchipper bars. The width, shallow drop and short reach really make a difference when you encounter singletrack or rougher roads. Drop bars in general just make long pedals much easier with all the different hand positions.

Drivetrain depends on where you're riding and how much climbing you're encountering. I am forced to climb a lot so I go with a 38t single ring with a 10-40 in the back. I love the simplicity of it and the "bailout" 40t on rear but I do sacrifice top end speed on flat and downhills.

I can see why people would go 2x for the granny gear options in very hilly terrain but then you're adding about a pound between the derailleur, additional ring, cable, housing and shifter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I highly recommend the Salsa Woodchipper bars. The width, shallow drop and short reach really make a difference when you encounter singletrack or rougher roads. Drop bars in general just make long pedals much easier with all the different hand positions.

Drivetrain depends on where you're riding and how much climbing you're encountering. I am forced to climb a lot so I go with a 38t single ring with a 10-40 in the back. I love the simplicity of it and the "bailout" 40t on rear but I do sacrifice top end speed on flat and downhills.

I can see why people would go 2x for the granny gear options in very hilly terrain but then you're adding about a pound between the derailleur, additional ring, cable, housing and shifter.
We aren't super hilly where I am, but it is CO so the bike could be in any kind of terrain especially if switching duties between gravel/singletrack. Just trying not to limit it if I can. 1lb doesn't mean too much to me as I am a heavy rider anyway. Honestly, this bike will probably stay in this setup 95% of the time, I'm surely being at least a little paranoid thinking I'm really limiting myself when it is RARELY on singletrack or the road (other than the occasional 6 mile commute).

I did a gravel ride with my current cobbled together 3x setup the other night. Granted it was just over an hour long, but even with 2.2 mtb tires on it and flat bars it did fine. I threw an old set of Ergon grips with the little bar ends on there and liked having the alternate hand position (never liked those grips for regular riding). I think I'm more likely to use something like that than drops. Most of my rides are likely to be in the 2 hour range, with occasional longer ones.

I couldn't keep up with my buddy on his new Diverge, but I've never kept up with him on any ride, so it isn't the bikes fault. I may cut the bars down a bit as well, they are old ones from another MTB and are at 780mm. I think I'm going to pick up a set of 700X42 gravel tires next and try again before making any drivetrain changes. Debating which rims to try the 42's on. My older archs I think are probably 19mm internal width while my more recent Flow EX's (from 4 or so years ago?) are probably 25.5 from the looks of it. Not sure about a 42mm tire on a 25.5 rim? The Flows are a nicer wheelset w/ better hubs but I guess I need to see how square they'd look. If I put them on my Arch's I have to remove my trainer tire, not that I've been riding it since the weather has started heating up. But nice to be able to switch it to trainer duty quicker.

Tire Bicycle tire Bicycle wheel Wheel Bicycle frame

*yes that is a gatorade in the bottle holder.... forgot my water bottle at the house. It was either that or Coors Original (not sure I made the right choice).
 

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I'm sure they will work fine I use some old Roval Control 29's which are 23mm internal I think. I bet most of the modern gravel tires are designed around wider rims anyway so doubt it will affect tread performance, plus they give better sidewall support so you can get away with lower psi
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm sure they will work fine I use some old Roval Control 29's which are 23mm internal I think. I bet most of the modern gravel tires are designed around wider rims anyway so doubt it will affect tread performance, plus they give better sidewall support so you can get away with lower psi
42's mounted fine on my Flow EX's. I went with a Specialized Pathfinder Pro (only 42's they had in stock at my preferred shop..... they had the Sawtooth in a 38). Will give them a go and see how they work hopefully sometime this week. Forgot my rear wheel needed a new tape job, so it's a tube in back and tubeless in the front temporarily.
 
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