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Discussion Starter #1
During this season I got back into mountain biking, I knew that I needed something better then what I was currently riding at the time so I saved what I could and got myself a 2005 Gary Fisher Marlin. I put Avid BB7's on it and a firmer spring in the Manitou Axel fork.

I enjoyed riding this bike for the season and now that the season is over and there could be some deals to get in the off season or in the spring before the season picks up I've been thinking of doing some upgrades. The drivetrain is Deore mostly so for me its been okay but I've been thinking to upgrade the crank to something a little nicer (maybe the LX external bearing one)

and then the other thing that I'd like to update is the fork, I find that with my weight (250 lbs) the fork isn't as stiff as it could be, I've been looking at the reviews and I've been thinking about the Reba SL, but this shock is almost 1/2 as much as the bike.

So with all that background, here is the question. Do I start some upgrades during the off season to try and get this bike slowly to be perfect (When parts break I will slowly put LX parts on it but nothing more then that) or do I ride this bike all next season the way that it is and save my money to get a deal on a higher level bike (maybe a GF X-Caliber or GF Cake)

BTW, I'm fairly tall 6 2" and most of my height is in my torso (only have 30" inseam) so I find the GF bikes fit me really well.

Thanks for you time
 

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Old man on a bike
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I'm generally of the opinion that you'll do better to shop for the bike frame/component level you are aiming at, the best deals come as the complete package. Sell the old bike if you need to or have a backup. If you really like the sport and are going to stick with it, I'd ride what you've got a bit more and save for that next bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah it sounds like in the end I would have a better bike if I just went with a full package when I had enough money saved. There is nothing wrong with the bike I have so I think I'm going to ride it until something happens and I need to upgrade. The bike might not be the best, but I'm definitly not the best rider yet either, hopefully when my skill is ready for a better bike so will my pocket book :)
 

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ride hard take risks
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Turt99 said:
Yeah it sounds like in the end I would have a better bike if I just went with a full package when I had enough money saved. There is nothing wrong with the bike I have so I think I'm going to ride it until something happens and I need to upgrade. The bike might not be the best, but I'm definitly not the best rider yet either, hopefully when my skill is ready for a better bike so will my pocket book :)
Sounds like a good plan. Get the skills up a little more while saving for a shinny new ride. I have spent the money on upgrades only to sell them for alot less than i put into them. Like you said the fork is 1/2 the price of the bike, then you do the drive train, drive chain, cables & housing, shifters STOP, it will never end. Save the duckets!!
 

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Don't upgrade

Instead convert that Marlin to a rigid singlespeed and get a better geared bike. Double your fun.
 

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I was in the same situation. I had a GF Cake3. I upgraded the grips, crankset, and seat. I was considering upgrading the wheels and fork and stem and tires and derailleurs and seatpost.... I then realized that the only thing that would be original was the frame and handlebar. My riding skills were getting better and I was riding faster than ever. The single pivot design flaws were really starting to show through. With this concern and my long list of future upgrades, I decided I would be better off selling the bike and using that money for a new bike.

My LBS had a sale on the Specialized Stumpjumper and I just couldn't resist. I bought the bike and in the middle of swapping the grips and seat to the Stumpy, a customer approached me about buying the Cake. I gladly sold it to him with the crankset and got more than I expected out of the deal.

BTW, the Stumpy is far superior to the Cake in every aspect and I am a firm believer that Genesis is not all that it is cracked up to be.
 

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If I were in your position I'd just ride that sucker until you can spend for a new bike.

Given your size and stature I think you would be very well served by a 29" wheeled MTB. Since you seem to be an XC rider, and are over 6', even those who have howled for years about how wrong 29er's are (most never spent any real time on them) will, at this point in time, admit that a 29er is a fine choice for you.

Don't get me wrong, we now have a couple of very capable all mountain 29er's but they are pretty spendo. Also, there are a fair # of folk all the way down to 5' riding and loving the bigwheels. Just for us big folk (I'm 6'3" and 211#'s) the 29er is a no brainer.

Come check it out: http://forums.mtbr.com/forumdisplay.php?f=61

Drink the Kool-Aid! (dark inside joke)

29erchico
 

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Discussion Starter #8
29erchico said:
If I were in your position I'd just ride that sucker until you can spend for a new bike.

Given your size and stature I think you would be very well served by a 29" wheeled MTB. Since you seem to be an XC rider, and are over 6', even those who have howled for years about how wrong 29er's are (most never spent any real time on them) will, at this point in time, admit that a 29er is a fine choice for you.

29erchico
Thanks for the advice everyone

Yes 29erchico when I was looking at bikes before I took a look at the 29ers but since none of the stores around me had any to try and only one that seemed to be in my price range at the time was the rig. I didn' t think it was the right choice for me.

I'm not fit enough to be able to ride a singlespeed bike, I know I wouldn't make it up any of the hills and that the technical sections would cause me problems.

However this season I'm going to have to see if I can test a 29er just to see how it feels, they really look like interesting bikes.

So I think the plan is going to be to ride my current bike just the way it is next season, hopefully nothing major breaks and I can save enough money to get an even better ride during the end of season sales.
 

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Not Fit Enough?

[I'm not fit enough to be able to ride a singlespeed bike, I know I wouldn't make it up any of the hills and that the technical sections would cause me problems.]

BS! Singlespeed will improve your fitness and you'll be amazed at what you can ride. There is no shame in waking. It will quickly teach you valuable lessons that often takes years on a geared bike.

Don't fight it, you will end up with multiple bikes eventually so just let it happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I've been thinking to maybe turn my old Haro V1 (1997 or something) into a single speed, but never really got around to it, If I did that I'd probably put the threaded headset back on and find the original rigid forks from the bike.

I don't know how much I'd ride it, but for starters I think I'm going to try and make that my indoor trainer bike.

The problem with me not being fit enough is that I already walk my bike up hills while I still have access to a granny gear :) I can only imagine what it would me if I only had 1 gear, it might be like taking my bike for a walk. However the plan is to try to use my treadmill and setup an indoor trainer over the off season to hopefully get me in better shape by the start of the season in the spring.
 

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buy a new bike....one thing to remeber though....a bran new fork will need the heavy duty springs for your size
 
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