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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was watching a youtube thing where the dude was replacing a wheel he had ruined. and he was like, "the wheel was a year old anyway, it was pretty used up so don't get mad that i ruined them"

I was just thinking: how long do any of our parts last?

was his wheel really trashed beyond saving? or could he have taken better care of it?

I was reading another thread about people's first low-end bikes, and they were all saying, "i replaced that fork after a few months because it was shot"

do OEM parts and aftermartket parts differ in their duration?

grant it, i know it depends on how, where, when, and why.

But then, you hear stories of people buying a bike and riding it forever... did they maintain their bike and parts and/or did they replace the parts as they wear?




p.s. bonus points to ones who know what video I'm talking about
 

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Depends on what the OEM parts are. A lot of nice bikes come with parts that are better than anything I have ever purchased as an upgrade. The rest is highly subjective and depends on how each rider uses and maintains their bike.
 

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Bottom line, it depends on how you ride it. My buddy rocks a really old Giant Talon and he damn near obliterated it and it has yet to die. He's been riding this bike for 4+ years and it still keeps going. He's taken it through Tiger Mountain here in Issaquah, WA which is a place not really meant for starter bikes. He also raced XC and jumped the hell out of it on diamond jump lines. The bike just won't die. All the parts are OEM too.

His spring fork is pretty much shot and useless so he rides it like that. He also replaced a crank arm and that's about it. Next time I see him, I will take a photo of it and share :D
 

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I know with the fork thing it's because most bikes under $1000 come with a pretty crappy fork. Not only with a steel spring rather than air, but they apparently use plastic bushings where higher end forks use metal, and they just don't hold up to hard use, plus the forks are really not adjustable anyway, so even if they held up, you would still want to upgrade.
Like my pitch fork has no rebound adjust. It does, in theory, haveI preload adjustment, but I cannot tell any difference from one end to the other of the adjustment range... It also has a sticker that says it's not for downhill, jumping or any hard riding.... Using it on real mtb trails will wear it out faster than your average dirt road. I imagine it would last a lifetime on paved bike paths, but a pro mountain biker could destroy it in days.

It's not so much a matter of oem parts being crap, it's the oem parts are made to fit a specific price point. The oem fork that comes on higher end bikes is often the same one that those with more beginner oriented bikes like mine are upgrading to, but is still crap compared to the stuff that comes on $3000 bikes....

On things like wheels, I'm guessing it's not so much that the own stuff is complete crap, it's just they are not what that person would buy, so it's no big loss to have to build new ones with his own favorite parts.
 

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I was watching a youtube thing where the dude was replacing a wheel he had ruined. and he was like, "the wheel was a year old anyway, it was pretty used up so don't get mad that i ruined them"

I was just thinking: how long do any of our parts last?

was his wheel really trashed beyond saving? or could he have taken better care of it?

I was reading another thread about people's first low-end bikes, and they were all saying, "i replaced that fork after a few months because it was shot"

do OEM parts and aftermartket parts differ in their duration?

grant it, i know it depends on how, where, when, and why.

But then, you hear stories of people buying a bike and riding it forever... did they maintain their bike and parts and/or did they replace the parts as they wear?

p.s. bonus points to ones who know what video I'm talking about
Depend on what it is, where it's been ridden, and how it's been ridden.

I've owned bikes with parts that fall across the complete range of what's available. I've owned stuff at the absolute bottom and a few things from the absolute top. Mostly stuff somewhere in the middle.

For the stuff at the bottom that I've owned, they've required more frequent maintenance to keep running well. But sometimes certain tasks just weren't possible. The better stuff I buy (I usually buy for durability/serviceability over other priorities) tends to have longer service intervals, and truly ruining a part tends to require some pretty hard riding (or crashing) or some serious neglect.

For a wheel, without knowing the exact video in question, the most likely scenario is hard riding in burlier terrain ruining a rim. The whole wheel isn't necessarily ruined. The hub is probably still in serviceable condition. But if it's a proprietary design, it's possible that it's not so easy to build it up with a new rim on the existing hub.

Now, speaking to stuff that I've owned over the years, breaking stuff happens at inopportune moments. It only takes one incident with a weird stress or impact and a part can be done in your first ride with it. But if you can avoid breaking stuff, I've had plenty of parts last over a decade with some attention and care. Once you start owning stuff like that, you'll start wearing things out and that's something that creeps up on you. Good service can really extend the life of reasonably good quality parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I know with the fork thing it's because most bikes under $1000 come with a pretty crappy fork. Not only with a steel spring rather than air, but they apparently use plastic bushings where higher end forks use metal, and they just don't hold up to hard use, plus the forks are really not adjustable anyway, so even if they held up, you would still want to upgrade.
Like my pitch fork has no rebound adjust. It does, in theory, haveI preload adjustment, but I cannot tell any difference from one end to the other of the adjustment range... It also has a sticker that says it's not for downhill, jumping or any hard riding.... Using it on real mtb trails will wear it out faster than your average dirt road. I imagine it would last a lifetime on paved bike paths, but a pro mountain biker could destroy it in days.

It's not so much a matter of oem parts being crap, it's the oem parts are made to fit a specific price point. The oem fork that comes on higher end bikes is often the same one that those with more beginner oriented bikes like mine are upgrading to, but is still crap compared to the stuff that comes on $3000 bikes....

On things like wheels, I'm guessing it's not so much that the own stuff is complete crap, it's just they are not what that person would buy, so it's no big loss to have to build new ones with his own favorite parts.
I was actually referencing your thread when I mentioned fork replacement on low-end bikes
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bottom line, it depends on how you ride it. My buddy rocks a really old Giant Talon and he damn near obliterated it and it has yet to die. He's been riding this bike for 4+ years and it still keeps going. He's taken it through Tiger Mountain here in Issaquah, WA which is a place not really meant for starter bikes. He also raced XC and jumped the hell out of it on diamond jump lines. The bike just won't die. All the parts are OEM too.

His spring fork is pretty much shot and useless so he rides it like that. He also replaced a crank arm and that's about it. Next time I see him, I will take a photo of it and share :D
So cool, that's what I'm saying you sometimes hear of these stories..

but by the tone of your post, i'm sensing that you expected the bike or any bike to have had more problems than he's had in the last four years based on what he's done on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Depend on what it is, where it's been ridden, and how it's been ridden.

I've owned bikes with parts that fall across the complete range of what's available. I've owned stuff at the absolute bottom and a few things from the absolute top. Mostly stuff somewhere in the middle.

For the stuff at the bottom that I've owned, they've required more frequent maintenance to keep running well. But sometimes certain tasks just weren't possible. The better stuff I buy (I usually buy for durability/serviceability over other priorities) tends to have longer service intervals, and truly ruining a part tends to require some pretty hard riding (or crashing) or some serious neglect.

For a wheel, without knowing the exact video in question, the most likely scenario is hard riding in burlier terrain ruining a rim. The whole wheel isn't necessarily ruined. The hub is probably still in serviceable condition. But if it's a proprietary design, it's possible that it's not so easy to build it up with a new rim on the existing hub.

Now, speaking to stuff that I've owned over the years, breaking stuff happens at inopportune moments. It only takes one incident with a weird stress or impact and a part can be done in your first ride with it. But if you can avoid breaking stuff, I've had plenty of parts last over a decade with some attention and care. Once you start owning stuff like that, you'll start wearing things out and that's something that creeps up on you. Good service can really extend the life of reasonably good quality parts.
it wasn't what he did to ruin the wheel -- it was a stunt for youtube -- it was more of his reasoning in the subsequent video in which he got new replacement wheels that he was like, "that wheel was an year old and pretty much done."

it gave me a sense that he treated his wheel as a consumable, that because of the stuff he does that he expects to replace parts on his bike more often.

I've been keeping a log of my rides with where, how far, and how long. I'm not really sure what it all means. But hopefully it'll be helpful for me to know when something needs service or replacing.
 

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it wasn't what he did to ruin the wheel -- it was a stunt for youtube -- it was more of his reasoning in the subsequent video in which he got new replacement wheels that he was like, "that wheel was an year old and pretty much done."

it gave me a sense that he treated his wheel as a consumable, that because of the stuff he does that he expects to replace parts on his bike more often.

I've been keeping a log of my rides with where, how far, and how long. I'm not really sure what it all means. But hopefully it'll be helpful for me to know when something needs service or replacing.
Some people are like that. They get bored with something and change it out frequently. I don't tend to be like that. I keep stuff for awhile and maintain my stuff to keep it in service. I'm driving a 12 yr old car that I bought new and paid off years ago. I service the appliances in my house rather than buying new (most of the time). I service my bikes and buy new stuff pretty infrequently.

On the one hand, the people that have to buy new all the time help keep things affordable for folks who don't want to spend a ton to buy new (and also keep demand for high end parts high, and hopefully cost down some), but IMO, they also tend to generate a bit of unnecessary waste.
 

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I was just thinking: how long do any of our parts last?

do OEM parts and aftermartket parts differ in their duration?
Regarding OEM parts... often, "OEM" parts are made by the aftermarket parts companies and branded by the OEM.

As for how long parts last... depends on the component level. I still have a 2003 Gary Fisher Sugar 3+ I bought new in '03 that has still has its original XT drive train on it. It also has its original Fox Race R rear shock. RS Judy fork and Bontrager wheel set was finally due a couple of years ago (but their life has been extended on an older gravel bike). I rode that thing 3+ times a week 'year round at at least 10 miles a ride for 10 years. That's 15k miles. I still take it out once and a while when I feel like zipping around on a XC bike.

On the other side of things... I had bikes with LX level components that barely lasted 2 seasons. I've had wheel sets that couldn't stay true for one season. And I've had forks and shocks that just weren't the same after their first service.

So, yeah, it depends...
 
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