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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got the chance to jump on a new bike coming with Shimano Deore M6100 brakes. 2 piston.

Then, I heard a rumor and saw on a few other official dealer competitor bike shops they're coming with M6120 4-piston in the build. I was super excited and pulled the trigger to buy one (although my bike shop never verified if they were the 4 piston brakes). When I verified with the bike shop I bought it from the build comes with the 2 piston. So, bad rumor. And now I'm kind of bummed.

Bike shop said an upgrade to SLX 4-piston (M7120's) can be done for an extra $150 bucks (to include levers and calipers).
So I would go from M6100 2-piston to M7120 4-piston.

Substantial? Is it a no brainer to upgrade for $150 or just leave it?
 

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I got the chance to jump on a new bike coming with Shimano Deore M6100 brakes. 2 piston.

Then, I heard a rumor and saw on a few other official dealer competitor bike shops they're coming with M6120 4-piston in the build. I was super excited and pulled the trigger to buy one (although my bike shop never verified if they were the 4 piston brakes). When I verified with the bike shop I bought it from the build comes with the 2 piston. So, bad rumor. And now I'm kind of bummed.

Bike shop said an upgrade to SLX 4-piston (M7120's) can be done for an extra $150 bucks (to include levers and calipers).
So I would go from M6100 2-piston to M7120 4-piston.

Substantial? Is it a no brainer to upgrade for $150 or just leave it?
Personally I'd do it. But maybe $150 isn't as much to me as it might be to someone else.
The reason I'd do it is I have three bikes with Shimano brakes --
#1 with 2-piston, 203mm rotors (XTR)
#2 with 4-piston, 203mm rotors (Deore)
#3 with 2-piston, 220mm rotors (SLX)

I weight 183# out of the shower, am 6'1", have owned a lot of bikes. I like the powerful feel of Shimano brakes (some say they're "on/off" -- personally I prefer this.)
Honestly, bike #1 is awesome 99% of the time. As speed controllers, I never wish for more than these brakes. But when I actually want to STOP in a hurry (not just control speed), they leave a bit to be desired.
Bike #2 is a 54# ebike and those 4-pot Deore brakes are amazing. AMAZING. Right in the middle between bike #1 & bike #3.
Bike #3 is a 37# long-travel 29er bulldozer. The 2-pot SLX brakes with 220mm rotors are BY FAR the strongest of the three. I mean, it's almost too much. For speed control, I actually prefer bike #1 with the 2-pots & 203mm rotors. But whenever I want to stop RIGHT NOW -- bike #3 unquestionably wins the all out power battle. I would never want more than this. I actually might want less. They're that powerful. And I'm one of those guys who believes that modulation is in the finger, not the brake. The 220mm rotors make a good argument that I might be wrong about this.
=sParty
 

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It's honestly a worthwhile upgrade. Previous bike had 2 piston Shimanos. New bike has 4 piston Shimano SLX. They're phenomenal. The modulation allows you to give exactly what pressure you need. The 2 piston had incredible power, but you'd push, then all the sudden immediately lock it up. To the point I became rear brake heavy out of fear I'd be going OTB (I never did as a disclaimer). With the 4 piston I feel way more in control, safer and I'm braking way later as I can use the front for it's purpose, slowing you down in a hurry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Overall the bike will be my first proper trail bike, first full squish, is alloy, with a Deore build all around. It's at the very bottom of the pack in terms of it's components and other carbon frame options. Rotors are 180mm. The bike overall is most likely gonna be around 33# and I'm 145# myself.

What are they offering for $150, 1 brake & lever set or 2?

Shops are selling a single 7120 caliper for around $90 and a single 7120 caliper/7100 lever set for around $180.
Good question, I'll follow up with my bikeshop if the upgrade is for both front and rear. I assumed it was $150 total for both front/rear and caliper/lever brakes to 4 piston SLX.

It's honestly a worthwhile upgrade. Previous bike had 2 piston Shimanos. New bike has 4 piston Shimano SLX. They're phenomenal. The modulation allows you to give exactly what pressure you need. The 2 piston had incredible power, but you'd push, then all the sudden immediately lock it up. To the point I became rear brake heavy out of fear I'd be going OTB (I never did as a disclaimer). With the 4 piston I feel way more in control, safer and I'm braking way later as I can use the front for it's purpose, slowing you down in a hurry.
Wow thanks for that insight. honestly, the more I think about it, the more I feel I'd regret not having 4 piston brakes so I'm leaning more towards asking them to do it.
 

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I come here to digress with all previous posters.

I have a bike with MT520 brakes, which esentially are 4 piston Deores, and I've been riding them for a year.

The upgrade is not worth it IMHO. 2 piston Deores work perfectly well to the point I couldn't tell the difference If I didn't look at the calipers.
 

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I can't speak for Deores, but I did upgrade the wife's bike from 2-piston MT200 to 4-piston SLX 7120's. Big difference. Though I did throw on the icetech XT rotors to go with it.
So a question would be does the $150 include an upgrade to SLX or XT rotors as well as the levers/calipers? If so, no brainer, do it👍
 

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I got the chance to jump on a new bike coming with Shimano Deore M6100 brakes. 2 piston.

Then, I heard a rumor and saw on a few other official dealer competitor bike shops they're coming with M6120 4-piston in the build. I was super excited and pulled the trigger to buy one (although my bike shop never verified if they were the 4 piston brakes). When I verified with the bike shop I bought it from the build comes with the 2 piston. So, bad rumor. And now I'm kind of bummed.

Bike shop said an upgrade to SLX 4-piston (M7120's) can be done for an extra $150 bucks (to include levers and calipers).
So I would go from M6100 2-piston to M7120 4-piston.

Substantial? Is it a no brainer to upgrade for $150 or just leave it?
Decision is easy - ride 2 pistons brake, if you like it keep it and save 150$ for something else :D
If you find it too weak or overheating, then go 4-piston brake or/and larger rotors.

Contrary to some posters who think that 4-piston is the only possible brake these days the truth is that modern Deore 2-piston brake is plenty good enough for a wast majority of general trail riders these days.
 

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I can't speak for Deores, but I did upgrade the wife's bike from 2-piston MT200 to 4-piston SLX 7120's. Big difference. Though I did throw on the icetech XT rotors to go with it.
So a question would be does the $150 include an upgrade to SLX or XT rotors as well as the levers/calipers? If so, no brainer, do it👍
MT200 (and 400) are crap compared to anything with servowave.

I've tried 2 piston Deore, MT520 4 piston, SLX 2 piston and XT 4 piston brakes and, to be honest, I wouldn't be able to tell them apart on a blind test. On my current bike I ended up with MT520 because they were only 20€ more than 2 piston Deores, but to be honest, it wasn't worth it. They feel the same, and with 4 pistons they're more prone to having issues.

MT200/400, on the other hand, have a lot less power. I run MT400 brakes on a utility bike and they're perfect for that purpose, but they're too weak for mountain biking.
 

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My guess is the shop will swap out the brakes and keep the take-offs to sell, hence the lower price. Also means the deal may be off if you do some rides with them, check with the shop.
 

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It's honestly a worthwhile upgrade. Previous bike had 2 piston Shimanos. New bike has 4 piston Shimano SLX. They're phenomenal. The modulation allows you to give exactly what pressure you need. The 2 piston had incredible power, but you'd push, then all the sudden immediately lock it up. To the point I became rear brake heavy out of fear I'd be going OTB (I never did as a disclaimer). With the 4 piston I feel way more in control, safer and I'm braking way later as I can use the front for it's purpose, slowing you down in a hurry.
This, this, this!

My old XT 2 pistons had plenty of power. But the line between controlled braking and skidding was razor sharp. My new XT 4 pistons control and modulate their power so much better.

Does not matter how much power a brake can generate, if your tires can't maintain traction it's useless.
 

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This, this, this!

My old XT 2 pistons had plenty of power. But the line between controlled braking and skidding was razor sharp. My new XT 4 pistons control and modulate their power so much better.

Does not matter how much power a brake can generate, if your tires can't maintain traction it's useless.
Anyone running 2 piston Shimanos should also build several days of volunteer trail maintenance into their riding schedule. I always felt bad locking up the rear with the brakes heading into banked turns just adding to the washboard the Instagram and YouTube video guys make for cool shots.
 

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Rather than saying, "anyone", please speak for yourself.
If you can't handle them, then do whatever you gotta do.
Meanwhile I don't have -- have never had -- any problem modulating Shimano 2-piston disc brakes.
Well, until I stepped up to 220mm rotors -- these require an extremely light touch.
Anyway lots of people don't have modulation problems with Shimano 2-piston disc brakes.
Those who can't master the touch should mitigate their problem however they see fit but it's not right to imply that everyone else suffers the same inability.
=sParty
 

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Rather than saying, "anyone", please speak for yourself.
If you can't handle them, then do whatever you gotta do.
Meanwhile I don't have -- have never had -- any problem modulating Shimano 2-piston disc brakes.
Well, until I stepped up to 220mm rotors. Anyway lots of people don't have modulation problems with Shimano 2-piston disc brakes.
=sParty
I've ridden multiple 2 piston Shimano bikes and they have all felt almost the exact same just depends on how much pad is left. I totally forgot how bad they were until I've been riding on 4 pistons all summer. I rented a bike at a ski resort with the 2 piston, first corner, barely touch the rear, totally locked up.

I remember being totally blown away in a good way my first experience with the 2 piston. I had come from some Avids that would be downright scary, lever pulled all the way to the bar and not enough power to slow down. Then I got the 2 piston, and loved that I could actually stop of I wanted to. However once you have run the 4 piston for any length of time, you'll never want to ride the old ones again.
 

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Rather than saying, "anyone", please speak for yourself.
If you can't handle them, then do whatever you gotta do.
Meanwhile I don't have -- have never had -- any problem modulating Shimano 2-piston disc brakes.
Well, until I stepped up to 220mm rotors -- these require an extremely light touch.
Anyway lots of people don't have modulation problems with Shimano 2-piston disc brakes.
Those who can't master the touch should mitigate their problem however they see fit but it's not right to imply that everyone else suffers the same inability.
=sParty
Getting pretty upset over a simple joke from the guy...
 

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I've ridden multiple 2 piston Shimano bikes and they have all felt almost the exact same just depends on how much pad is left. I totally forgot how bad they were until I've been riding on 4 pistons all summer. I rented a bike at a ski resort with the 2 piston, first corner, barely touch the rear, totally locked up.

I remember being totally blown away in a good way my first experience with the 2 piston. I had come from some Avids that would be downright scary, lever pulled all the way to the bar and not enough power to slow down. Then I got the 2 piston, and loved that I could actually stop of I wanted to. However once you have run the 4 piston for any length of time, you'll never want to ride the old ones again.
You might have missed my post #2 above, wherein I mentioned the Shimano brakes I own, which include both Shimano 2-pot and Shimano 4-pot brakes. I'm not speaking from inexperience. I'm just not speaking for others due to any inability on my part to operate either brake with success.
In other words my point in my previous post (#17) has less to do with Shimano 2-piston brakes and more to do with your saying "you" when you really should be saying "me." For example, you said:
However once you have run the 4 piston for any length of time, you'll never want to ride the old ones again.
That's not correct. Perhaps you meant to say:
However once I ran the 4 piston for any length of time, I'd never want to ride the old ones again.
You see, you described how you feel. You didn't describe how I feel. Yet you said, "you" when you obviously meant "me."
=sParty
 
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