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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day. I am planning to ugrade my brakes on my new bike. The problem im trying to solve, that the bike is equiped with the Rockshox Judy Silver TK fork. I was reading about a problem when using bigger brake rotors 203 mm size, then while braking there is too much flex in the stanchions. Im a 110 kg rider and need somehow upgrade the MT410 brakes and the Shimano RT56 180/160 rotors. My plan was to buy the 4-piston SLX BR-M7120 Disc Brake Set and new brake rotors 203+180 XT SM-RT86 6-hole.
What would you recommend?
 

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Just from a quick look, your fork will have 80-120mm of travel??

Which leads me to summise that the fork is on an entry level mtb, designed for smooth off road trails or XC type riding.

However... Google does say that the max rotor size is 185/210.

Based on this info, you could run 200 and 180 rotors.

You'll need the appropriate adapters to do so.

You're about the same size as I am.

I'm not sure how long you've been in the sport.

Based on question and fork specs, I'm guessing not long.

I myself started out in the sport riding a bike w/ 120mm travel Rockshox something or other.

It had Tektro brakes which were quite good.

However, I kept buckling the back wheel.

I eventually got a stronger rear wheel built up, which only buckled half as regularly.

I then decided to upgrade bike and I haven't looked back.

If you're riding flatter terrain and want a little more stopping power, 180 rotors front and rear should suffice.

You could also run metallic brake pads. They have a bit more bite than resin.

You'll likely need an adapter out back. Looks like the Judy can take 180 w/o adapter, possibly up front.

If you're getting into steeper, more technically challenging terrain and are finding it hard to control speed - better brakes will help...

But maybe it's time to get a better suited bike??

Best of luck sorting brakes.

Sent from my Asus Rog 3
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just from a quick look, your fork will have 80-120mm of travel??

Which leads me to summise that the fork is on an entry level mtb, designed for smooth off road trails or XC type riding.

However... Google does say that the max rotor size is 185/210.

Based on this info, you could run 200 and 180 rotors.

You'll need the appropriate adapters to do so.

You're about the same size as I am.

I'm not sure how long you've been in the sport.

Based on question and fork specs, I'm guessing not long.

I myself started out in the sport riding a bike w/ 120mm travel Rockshox something or other.

It had Tektro brakes which were quite good.

However, I kept buckling the back wheel.

I eventually got a stronger rear wheel built up, which only buckled half as regularly.

I then decided to upgrade bike and I haven't looked back.

If you're riding flatter terrain and want a little more stopping power, 180 rotors front and rear should suffice.

You could also run metallic brake pads. They have a bit more bite than resin.

You'll likely need an adapter out back. Looks like the Judy can take 180 w/o adapter, possibly up front.

If you're getting into steeper, more technically challenging terrain and are finding it hard to control speed - better brakes will help...

But maybe it's time to get a better suited bike??

Best of luck sorting brakes.

Sent from my Asus Rog 3
Thanks for the answer. The travel of the fork si 100mm. The bike is new 2 months old /Trek X-Caliber 9-2021/ and yes im quite new to MTB. Im just concerned if too much stopping power dont do any damage to the fork.
 

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What is the braking issue you're dealing with? What brakes do you have now? A lot of good riders are pretty happy with 180s, or even 160s up front. I've done a 9+ minute fairly steep fire road descent during a race with 160mm rotors (that is a LONG descent without a break, 3 laps) and no trouble with the brakes (XT 785s, stock semi metallic pads), - it was my hands and forearms that were failing.

I would try new pads first, that might solve your problem, especially if you have a cheaper or non-metallic pad. I really like the stock shimano semi-metallic pads (04s?) in all conditions, Kool Stops are pretty much always good, and I've had good luck with Discobrakes and Truckerco semi metallic and sintered, for lower price options, - those are pretty inexpensive to try, discobrakes has their own online store, and truckerco is on ebay, both ship really fast in my experience. I'm sure others have good recommendations too.
 

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Good day. I am planning to ugrade my brakes on my new bike. The problem im trying to solve, that the bike is equiped with the Rockshox Judy Silver TK fork. I was reading about a problem when using bigger brake rotors 203 mm size, then while braking there is too much flex in the stanchions. Im a 110 kg rider and need somehow upgrade the MT410 brakes and the Shimano RT56 180/160 rotors. My plan was to buy the 4-piston SLX BR-M7120 Disc Brake Set and new brake rotors 203+180 XT SM-RT86 6-hole.
What would you recommend?
If you are upgrading significant components on a new bike my recommendation is see if you have a satisfaction guarantee to trade it for a different bike. It's nearly impossible to beat the value of components with a new bike, and decent bike makers specify reasonable or appropriate components for the bike's intended use and price point.
 

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Hmmm. Have you ridden the bike much on your intended trails? When i first started I was 230 pounds (105 kg) and i had those same brakes. I never had an issue with the amount of stopping power and i ride some pretty steep descents. If you want more stopping power you can get sintered pads but you will need new rotors as the rotors that came with that are resin pads only. If you are new to mt biking i doubt you need more stopping power than that as you probably are not on trails that are too much for your brakes. Going bigger in rotors helps with cooling so there is less fade in stopping power on long steep descents where you are on your brakes for long periods of time.
 

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Good day. I am planning to ugrade my brakes on my new bike. The problem im trying to solve, that the bike is equiped with the Rockshox Judy Silver TK fork. I was reading about a problem when using bigger brake rotors 203 mm size, then while braking there is too much flex in the stanchions. Im a 110 kg rider and need somehow upgrade the MT410 brakes and the Shimano RT56 180/160 rotors. My plan was to buy the 4-piston SLX BR-M7120 Disc Brake Set and new brake rotors 203+180 XT SM-RT86 6-hole.
What would you recommend?
You're right in the fork is flexy, particularly at our weight.

You're also correct in thinking larger rotor and more powerful brake up front will create stress on the fork.

This again is due to being a Clydesdale.

I think the safe bet would be 180mm rotors front and rear, nice two pot brakes and running metallic brake pads.

As you're fairly new to the sport, ride it (once new brakes/rotors onboard) as is until you grow out of it.

Look after it and keep it well maintained.

You'll be able to pay it forward and sell bike to someone else entering into our great pastime.

Then you'll be back on the forums looking for advice on which new bike to purchase.

All the best

Sent from my Asus Rog 3
 
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