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but they have nothing to remove an overtightened valve stem locking ring (or whatever it’s called) to get the tubeless valve out, so that they can install a tube. I have seen at least 5.
Muc Off valve stems have a 4mm hex machined into the base of the stem to assist with install and removal…
 

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since 4/10/2009
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EDIT: I wonder now if I could have helped those poor souls with my WT pliers…🤔
Yep, that's an advertised use for those pliers.

I use e.13 valves that don't use the irritating little nut. It's also possible that they cranked on the thing with pliers because they got sick of it loosening on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #164 ·
I use a presta valve cap that has a built-in core remover. These:
View attachment 1948262
I carry an extra valve core on rides, too. I've had to change one once.
I also carry a 2oz bottle of sealant along with plugs, Co2 and a pencil-sized pump.
As for threaded valve stem retainers, I use Problem Solvers Big P-Nuts. These:
View attachment 1948261
Don't need a tool to turn these.
=sParty
I only use the P-Nuts these days, just because they're easier to get off trailside.

I used to work in a shop and definitely saw other techs use pliers on valve stem nuts. Not sure why people think those things need to be cinched down like that. There's a reason the other end is a rubber tapered piece.
 

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high pivot witchcraft
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Muc Off valve stems have a 4mm hex machined into the base of the stem to assist with install and removal…
Don’t get me going on MucOff valves. I have them on 2 bikes. Both sets have the same problem - I have tried over 2 dozen pumps. They are all the same. Getting the pump head on and off them is like trying to wrestle a pit bull off a t-bone. Problem finally solved using a $1.99 presta to shrader converter and switching my pumps to schrader.

Household hardware Cylinder Plumbing fitting Auto part Metal

Tire Wheel Plant Bicycle tire Automotive tire
 

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The biggest mechanical issue I have seen on trails this year is guys who have flatted or burped running tubeless. They have a tube, levers, and a pump, CO2, and often both, but they have nothing to remove an overtightened valve stem locking ring (or whatever it’s called) to get the tubeless valve out, so that they can install a tube. I have seen at least 5. Maybe closer to 10 this year alone.

My theory is that one or more of the less experienced mechanics at one or more LBSs has used pliers to try to address a shitty tape job after doing a tubeless conversion that is leaking around the valve stem. Not sure though.

I DON’T carry mini pliers (except for the WolfTooth pliers mentioned above). But I also make sure that the valve stem locking ring on all my bikes is only finger tight.

EDIT: I wonder now if I could have helped those poor souls with my WT pliers…🤔
Yeah, I don't have pliers, but I have found that if the retaining nut is too tight, I can push in on the rubber side of the valve and it loosens enough to come off pretty easily. Now, if it's so tight that it's essentially welded in place, that's a problem!
 

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Yeah, I don't have pliers, but I have found that if the retaining nut is too tight, I can push in on the rubber side of the valve and it loosens enough to come off pretty easily. Now, if it's so tight that it's essentially welded in place, that's a problem!
Here's a trick for removing over tightened valve stems: press down on the valve on the inside of the rim.
 

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I see it happening for 2 reasons. First off, it's trendy to ride packless. Smart riders figure out how they can still carry what they need. But you do get complacent riders who think they can just leave the stuff at home altogether. The other crowd that seems to press for carrying less are the racers (and those who treat their regular rides like races). They want to avoid the weight of the gear regardless of where it's carried. Again, complacency is part of it and they figure that because they've never had a major problem that they don't need to worry about it. Some people think that all they have to worry about is a walk in the woods. Which, on its own, I agree, isn't much to worry about. But the way problems go in the woods, you can get compounding/snowballing issues that interact and make things worse.

You've gone super minimal and aren't carrying any gear or water (or are carrying minimal water that would be fine if everything went as planned). You have a mechanical or a crash that causes a mechanical, which sets you to walking because you don't have any tools to repair it, or even cobble together an improvised fix just to get rolling. Now you don't have enough water or any food AND you have a couple extra hours of walking. You get hungry and dehydrated. Now you're not thinking completely clearly and you make a mistake. Maybe it's a navigation mistake and you tack on yet more time to your walk or you maybe even get yourself into bigger trouble still. Or maybe you trip and hurt yourself which now adds more time. Now it's getting dark and temps are starting to drop. You don't have a headlamp to see where you're going. Maybe there's a weather system moving in that's going to bring some precip. That precip, even if it's just rain, makes you colder. You don't have a rain jacket to help keep you dry/warm, so now you're shivering and your mental faculties degrade further. And so on and so forth. This kind of scenario is not unusual or an unreasonable expectation.

True, lots of things have to go wrong. But this kind of thing happens all the time and SAR crews deal with the effects regularly. Sometimes they find the person and all ends up well. Sometimes they find a dead person.
This is why I carry a space blanket and flint in my pack I take on back country rides. They weigh next to nothing, take up very little space, and in a worst case scenario provide some shelter, a source of heat, light, and a beacon to be found.
 

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Out spokin'
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This is why I carry a space blanket and flint in my pack I take on back country rides. They weigh next to nothing, take up very little space, and in a worst case scenario provide some shelter, a source of heat, light, and a beacon to be found.
I do likewise except I go a step farther by including a lighter and a candle.
 

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Don’t get me going on MucOff valves. I have them on 2 bikes. Both sets have the same problem - I have tried over 2 dozen pumps. They are all the same. Getting the pump head on and off them is like trying to wrestle a pit bull off a t-bone. Problem finally solved using a $1.99 presta to shrader converter and switching my pumps to schrader.

View attachment 1948265
View attachment 1948266
I haven’t actually tried my mini-pump on the Muc-off valves, but both my floor pump and presto adapter for my compressor work with them.
 

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I think the OP should just keep on riding and let the rest of us take care of the underprepared and be the good guy.

I don’t mind making a memorable impact on someone’s day.

Also, you don’t need a pack. I carry everything in my carefully thought out rear pocket. I even carry spare seatpost bolts. Ti of course…


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