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1) I know Push says you have to use their big spring on their shock, but do you really?? I don't have an 11-6 (yet) but was thinking of putting one on a Megatower with Cascade link. With that aftermarket lower link, the shock is positioned in a way so the 11-6 doesn't quite fit because that spring is so wide.

2) For the popular size of 230mm, how do they build the shock with different stroke configurations (57.5, 60, 65)?? Do they simple put a spacer under the bumper like Cane Creek, or do they actually install a specific length shock tube and shaft?
 

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Push has said other springs might scratch the shock body and might damage something inside, forgot the name of that part. I was thinking the same as you but decided to stick with the hypercoil.

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I have run Ohlins springs on mine in the past with no issues but Darren recommends not to. I did it purely from an asthetics point of view though..

The thing is the PUSH is tuned around not having the Cascade link, adjusting the kinematics means the shock is no longer optimised around the new kinematics so you might aswell not bother fitting a PUSH. Or fit a PUSH and don't fit the Cascade.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Push also advertises progressive coils, so for some bike applications, they are likely setting it up with a progressive coil, which is needed to keep the shock from slamming into the bike on the biggest hits. On bikes designed for coil shocks, this is not a problem. For bikes kind of in the middle, this is usually a problem. For bikes designed for air shocks, they generally are not suitable for coils. Even though they "may work", the result is often less than optimal and if you are lacking progression, it's only going to rear it's head during the worst case scenario where you need it the most. But fitting a spring is usually a matter of ID and OD. If you meet their ID spec for the shock, you can use whatever spring you want on whatever shock. Whether it fits in the frame is usually all about the OD.
 

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I have run Ohlins springs on mine in the past with no issues but Darren recommends not to. I did it purely from an asthetics point of view though..

The thing is the PUSH is tuned around not having the Cascade link, adjusting the kinematics means the shock is no longer optimised around the new kinematics so you might aswell not bother fitting a PUSH. Or fit a PUSH and don't fit the Cascade.
They do make this statement which doesn't make much sense and was confusing when I first saw it...because as far as I know, all hypercoils are standard linear springs.

"Developed in conjunction with the hybrid HyperCoil progressive spring system, the secondary shaft piston provides large increases in compression damping during the last 15% of shock stroke."

I believe the progressivity they are reffering to comes from the damper not the spring.
 

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Bodhisattva
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1) I know Push says you have to use their big spring on their shock, but do you really?? I don't have an 11-6 (yet) but was thinking of putting one on a Megatower with Cascade link. With that aftermarket lower link, the shock is positioned in a way so the 11-6 doesn't quite fit because that spring is so wide.

2) For the popular size of 230mm, how do they build the shock with different stroke configurations (57.5, 60, 65)?? Do they simple put a spacer under the bumper like Cane Creek, or do they actually install a specific length shock tube and shaft?
This sounds like a bad idea on multiple levels. You propose using a non-recommended spring with a non-recommended link

Best advice is that you direct this question to PUSH directly, or accept expensive possible consequences if it doesn't work out.
 

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To answer your question number 2 I don't believe it is as simple as just adding or removing spacers as it is for other shocks and this is because it uses a hydraulic bottom out. I know for EXT shocks when the stroke length is changed the HBC piston must also be changed to in order to maintain the same 15% ramp up. If you are set on using the Cascade link and still want a top level shock you can still go with the EXT Arma or Storia.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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They do make this statement which doesn't make much sense and was confusing when I first saw it...because as far as I know, all hypercoils are standard linear springs.

"Developed in conjunction with the hybrid HyperCoil progressive spring system, the secondary shaft piston provides large increases in compression damping during the last 15% of shock stroke."

I believe the progressivity they are reffering to comes from the damper not the spring.
But they advertise it like this:

  • Ultralight Hybrid HyperCoil progressive spring system

So either they have a hypercoil progressive spring option, or they really suck at communications.
 

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Bodhisattva
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But they advertise it like this:

  • Ultralight Hybrid HyperCoil progressive spring system

So either they have a hypercoil progressive spring option, or they really suck at communications.
No. You just suck at reading comprehension
The website description of the coil SYSTEM is pretty clear

To compliment the linear HyperCoil spring, progressive open cell rod bumpers are specifically engineered to control ending stroke progression and spring rate, giving riders plush initial travel with plenty of ramp up to control the handling of large jumps and drops.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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No. You just suck at reading comprehension
The website description of the coil SYSTEM is pretty clear

To compliment the linear HyperCoil spring, progressive open cell rod bumpers are specifically engineered to control ending stroke progression and spring rate, giving riders plush initial travel with plenty of ramp up to control the handling of large jumps and drops.
So it's not a progressive spring system then?

Seems a little misleading to me. If I see progressive, I assume that's in the spring. A bumper by it's nature will always be progressive, as in it will always "add to" the end stroke force required.

Anyway, in previous iterations, I could have sworn they were advertising progressive springs for some applications. Maybe I'm wrong. The point though is ID and OD are all that really matters for springs.
 
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I have run Ohlins springs on mine in the past with no issues but Darren recommends not to. I did it purely from an asthetics point of view though..

The thing is the PUSH is tuned around not having the Cascade link, adjusting the kinematics means the shock is no longer optimised around the new kinematics so you might aswell not bother fitting a PUSH. Or fit a PUSH and don't fit the Cascade.
I think you're over-estimating the number of tunes in those shocks. @StoremanNorman said there were 4.
 

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There are 4, Darren said so himself, but those tune brackets are based around weight. The actually piston design, bottom out bumper etc is designed around the kinematics of the frame, of which the Cascade link changes.
Marketing speak for "bigger or smaller bumper".
 

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You already know PUSH make various specific parts depending on the frame and not just use generic parts and change shims so I don't know why you are trying to dumb it dowm. They have a few different materials and sizes for bottom out bumpers, they produce different pistons depending on the frame etc... Whether you think the execution or performance is perfect or not, the evidence is there that PUSH goes further than every other manufacture to at least attempt to make the most specifically tuned shock depending on the bike. Yes they only have 4 base tunes of which are whittled down from more specific tunes, but most of that is made up for with the wide range of the clickers. My only issue with my PUSH is I'm not sure they have got the HSR ideal for my taste, after all I asked Darren to spec me with a 425lb rather than the recommended 450lb spring, he fitted a dual stage stack etc...so I don't actually know which weight bracket tune he has put me on and if the HSR is suitable but then mine isn't a standard 11.6 so... But the point is if you are not happy with the set tunes from PUSH Darren will arrange a retune for you, it's not just a case of we think that's what is best so that's what you are gonna get, you will be suprised how flexible he actually is. As I already said previously my new 11.6 is drastically more supple off the top and on small bumps compared to my previous one, how much of that is the newer shock and how much is the specific tune Darren did for me I don't know...but the fact is Darren listened to me and sent me back a shock that was much more suitable for my preferences.
 

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You already know PUSH make various specific parts depending on the frame and not just use generic parts and change shims so I don't know why you are trying to dumb it dowm. They have a few different materials and sizes for bottom out bumpers, they produce different pistons depending on the frame etc... Whether you think the execution or performance is perfect or not, the evidence is there that PUSH goes further than every other manufacture to at least attempt to make the most specifically tuned shock depending on the bike. Yes they only have 4 base tunes of which are whittled down from more specific tunes, but most of that is made up for with the wide range of the clickers. My only issue with my PUSH is I'm not sure they have got the HSR ideal for my taste, after all I asked Darren to spec me with a 425lb rather than the recommended 450lb spring, he fitted a dual stage stack etc...so I don't actually know which weight bracket tune he has put me on and if the HSR is suitable but then mine isn't a standard 11.6 so... But the point is if you are not happy with the set tunes from PUSH Darren will arrange a retune for you, it's not just a case of we think that's what is best so that's what you are gonna get, you will be suprised how flexible he actually is. As I already said previously my new 11.6 is drastically more supple off the top and on small bumps compared to my previous one, how much of that is the newer shock and how much is the specific tune Darren did for me I don't know...but the fact is Darren listened to me and sent me back a shock that was much more suitable for my preferences.
Do we know that? I remain skeptical of claims made.
 
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