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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious, the 2 cross pattern would allow me to use an extra set of spokes laying around in the garage

Will a two cross disc lacing be noticeably less stiff / less reliable, or differences would be negligible?

Thanks
 

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The closer your spokes are to tangent at the hub, the more durable the wheel build can be. Since rims usually wear out first in a well-built wheel, in practice, you probably won't notice a difference. Go for it.
 

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Just curious, the 2 cross pattern would allow me to use an extra set of spokes laying around in the garage

Will a two cross disc lacing be noticeably less stiff / less reliable, or differences would be negligible?

Thanks
Assuming a 32 spoke wheel (24 and 28 spoke work well with 2X), if you are going to notice a difference in 2X vs 3X it will be under hard braking, and long term durability.

In 11 years of using disc brakes I have yet to wear out a rim. I have tacoed a few in crashes, and had a few that would not stay true (at least one of the later was laced 2X).
 

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I've owned 2x wheels (28 spokes) and can't say I've noticed any difference between them and 3x (both 28 and 32 spoke wheels).

If you got the spokes, I'd say go for it.
The tangental spoke angle of a 28-spoke/2X wheel is very close to that of a 32-spoke/3X, so they will have similar feel and torsional stability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the feedback, I didnt know that 2x wheels are laterally & radially stiffer than 3x wheels.

Is the lower long term durability affected by higher/different forces on the hub flange?
Many years ago, I experienced a front hub failure due to radial lacing - is the principle the same?
 

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Thanks for the feedback, I didnt know that 2x wheels are laterally & radially stiffer than 3x wheels.
That's an "all else equal" comparative statement. The reason is that the stiffness of wheels is related (partially) to the elasticity of the spokes. Total elasticity (elongation/load) is related to total length. The shorter the spokes, the stiffer the wheel. You already know that 2x spokes are shorter than 3x, I imagine. ;)
I'll say again that the differences are TINY.
Is the lower long term durability affected by higher/different forces on the hub flange?
I don't know that a conclusive statement can be made about long term durability and cross patterns. I have studied bike wheels for a long time and read everything I could find on analysis of them. I have never seen any work on this subject. I think the best you could do is use some loading data and some assumptions to estimate comparative fatigue life. However, there is an incredible amount of data scatter in fatigue analyses... so much so that you could never say anything conclusive about the behavior of one particular wheel or wheelset over another in terms of predicting service life (useful information). You could ride bikes 10 hours per day for a lifetime of 70 years and not touch enough data to say anything conclusive.
Many years ago, I experienced a front hub failure due to radial lacing - is the principle the same?
If what shiggy is saying is that the peak stresses from torque imposed on the hub are the reason for lower fatigue life, then no. A radially laced hub is never designed to transfer torque between the hub and rim.
The stresses in the hub are higher due to the loading geometry caused by radial lacing, but torque is not part of the equation.
 
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