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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
when i go off drops and jumps i am able to tweak a little bit by pushing the bars to the side so the bike tilts a little. i see people tweak by pushing sthe bars out and then pulling up and sideways with their legs . could you please give me some tips on how to do bigger tweaks? thanks
 

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Amazing Larry104 said:
when i go off drops and jumps i am able to tweak a little bit by pushing the bars to the side so the bike tilts a little. i see people tweak by pushing sthe bars out and then pulling up and sideways with their legs . could you please give me some tips on how to do bigger tweaks? thanks
----take you finger off the brake, rotate your hand forward and pull the grip to your belly. try it on the ground standing still with one foot down. watch the pros do it. see how their hand rotates forward on the grip. the hand on top rotates.
 

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CNC Dude
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timing is everything-

I will preface these comments with the admission that my "flatties" are rarely more flat than 45-50 degress off vertical.

I find that the timing of the trick is more important than all the body language in the world. Most of my experience comes from the dirtjumps. When you come off the lip, you can't delay AT ALL before starting the motion. It seems you need to use the bike's inertia to change its attitude in the air - while it's still accelerating. The sooner I begin tweaking on the bars at the instant of takeoff, the flatter I can get my tables, and the longer I can hold them. Same goes for all tricks, really - x-ups, no-footers, if you wait half a second too long, the bike loses its weightlessness, and begins to drop out from beneath you.

I also find that the bike will tweak out just a little more if you turn the front wheel up, old school. Then you can really spin the bike around its axis (that being the headtube, since basically you want to push the bars down to bring the bottom of the bike up). I think the "unturndown" style flattie looks way cooler, though, where the wheels stay in line with each other, and the front end of the bike is higher...it's all about style. For what it's worth, I think a less-flat table held for longer has more style than a really fast totally-flat table. Or a whipped-out flattie, where the rear end starts to drift around...

I was hanging out at a skatepark comp recently talking to Garson Fields, and he suggested pointing my knees down to really flatten the bike - I haven't had a chance to practice this yet because the local jumps are all wet.

I think to really table a drop, you'll have to actually bunnyhop off the end of the platform, so that the bike is rising in relation to your body.
 
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