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Don't take this the wrong way, but the best chance for you to improve is to find a buddy who knows how to ride corners and ask for practical advice while riding.

If you got no friends that are blazing fast when cornering you can always observe passers.

Explaining cornering on paper is a tough job, the dynamics and variables involved are many, but as a general rule in flat corners you lean the bike and you stay upright. In corners with berms where you lean with the bike, you want your cg as low as possible and your outside pedal at the 6 position to maximize tire grip.

p.s.

This dude is an excellent cornering teacher, google some videos of him on cornering technique and practice it.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Don't take this the wrong way, but the best chance for you to improve is to find a buddy who knows how to ride corners and ask for practical advice while riding.

If you got no friends that are blazing fast when cornering you can always observe passers.

Explaining cornering on paper is a tough job, the dynamics and variables involved are many, but as a general rule in flat corners you lean the bike and you stay upright. In corners with berms where you lean with the bike, you want your cg as low as possible and your outside pedal at the 6 position to maximize tire grip.

p.s.

This dude is an excellent cornering teacher, google some videos of him on cornering technique and practice it.

How do you want to load your bars? All weight on outside, inside, even distribution?
 

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The physics explanation is how you would do it if it were a single corner with a consistent radius, but like tire rolling data on a drum, it is not representative of real-world singletrack conditions.

Simon is a fantastic skills coach. His tips on footwork take a while to master, but make so much sense. Particularly in areas with rapid succession turns, not having to reset your feet is a huge advantage. Only put your foot down as much as you need to so you have something in reserve if conditions warrant or you simply made a misjudgment.

 

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I think your model far too simple.

When cornering on trails we dealing with a lot of change.
-The nature of the surface may change in the turn
-The radius of the turn changes
-the angle of banking in the turn changes
-the normal force between the tires changes due to terrain changes (bumps)
-the velocity of the rider may changing

With this in mind modern cornering technique is about adaptability. That is where "lean your bike not your body" comes from. Keeping your body in a more neutral position allows you to make the quick changes required to corner well on a variable surface.

One of the big themes you will see from any good instructor is the idea of rotation. If you are cornering to the left you need to get those hip rotated to the left. The actual foot work isn't really that important it is the rotation that really allows you to corner hard.
 

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I think your model far too simple.

When cornering on trails we dealing with a lot of change.
-The nature of the surface may change in the turn
-The radius of the turn changes
-the angle of banking in the turn changes
-the normal force between the tires changes due to terrain changes (bumps)
-the velocity of the rider may changing

With this in mind modern cornering technique is about adaptability. That is where "lean your bike not your body" comes from. Keeping your body in a more neutral position allows you to make the quick changes required to corner well on a variable surface.

One of the big themes you will see from any good instructor is the idea of rotation. If you are cornering to the left you need to get those hip rotated to the left. The actual foot work isn't really that important it is the rotation that really allows you to corner hard.
I like how you said that. It's one thing I noticed when racing Enduro on tracks guys are not familiar with....the "reserve" thing, aka, you can't commit 100% to a corner, there needs to be something left for errors, mis-calculations or blind features. When I'm riding that stuff I'm 100% committed to my line, if it gets tighter I'm screwed, if it's not as tight as I'd like, I'm slower than I should be....the top guys have enough reserve to go in fast and still correct for surprises...
 

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Don't take this the wrong way, but the best chance for you to improve is to find a buddy who knows how to ride corners and ask for practical advice while riding.

If you got no friends that are blazing fast when cornering you can always observe passers.

Explaining cornering on paper is a tough job, the dynamics and variables involved are many, but as a general rule in flat corners you lean the bike and you stay upright. In corners with berms where you lean with the bike, you want your cg as low as possible and your outside pedal at the 6 position to maximize tire grip.

p.s.

This dude is an excellent cornering teacher, google some videos of him on cornering technique and practice it.

If you're pressing in hard to the berm the pedal at 6 o'clock can be a bad thing. Depending on the g-forces you could be asking a single leg to take much more than your body weight.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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I think your model far too simple.

When cornering on trails we dealing with a lot of change.
-The nature of the surface may change in the turn
-The radius of the turn changes
-the angle of banking in the turn changes
-the normal force between the tires changes due to terrain changes (bumps)
-the velocity of the rider may changing

With this in mind modern cornering technique is about adaptability. That is where "lean your bike not your body" comes from. Keeping your body in a more neutral position allows you to make the quick changes required to corner well on a variable surface.

One of the big themes you will see from any good instructor is the idea of rotation. If you are cornering to the left you need to get those hip rotated to the left. The actual foot work isn't really that important it is the rotation that really allows you to corner hard.
If cornering to the left, do you mean rotating counter-clockwise? Or moving the hip to the left?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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If cornering to the left, do you mean rotating counter-clockwise? Or moving the hip to the left?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Rotating counter-clockwise, which can be accomplished by moving the him to the right.

I generally do some basic cornering drills (or what ever skill I am focusing on) at the start of every ride. Hip rotation is one of my go to.
 
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