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Hey, i am very interested in buying a turner DHR, however i heard they Brake jacked, so i was wondering who out there uses a floating break caliper, or if you know anything about them...

If you know prices or places to purchase them it would be greatly appreciated if you let me know....

Thanks in advance.

Drew.
 

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The Ancient One
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Drew_Dawg said:
Hey, i am very interested in buying a turner DHR, however i heard they Brake jacked, so i was wondering who out there uses a floating break caliper, or if you know anything about them...

If you know prices or places to purchase them it would be greatly appreciated if you let me know....

Thanks in advance.

Drew.
There are almost no bikes that actually have brake jack. "Jacking" in suspension talk means there is an extending torque acting on the suspension. The DHR has just the opposite.

Since people keep saying "brake jack", I propose we adopt Kidwoo's suggestion and use a new phrase "brake whack". It's the bad thing that happens with single pivot and some linkage bikes.

Check out this link for floating brakes:

www.therapycomponents.com
 

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Now with flavor!!
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Jeez. Good memory.

Like Steve said, therapy components makes the best one. Brian's a cool guy and posts here under the name shock. If you've got a hadley hub, he makes a neat little kit that's well integrated.

I've been riding a DHR for almost 3 years now and I keep telling myself that I want to try one. But every time I go riding, I have so much fun on the bike I forget to order one.

I have no doubt that a floater would smooth out the bike a little bit when you need to drag your brakes but to be honest, the design really doesn't lend itself to horrible braking like some others (ie lawill). Before I got a turner, I rode Karpiel bikes which have a really rearward axle path so you can drag your brakes and feel pretty much no effect on the suspension. The DHR on the other hand arcs a little foward so some of the harsh braking people mention (in my mind at least) has more to do the bike feeling like it's hanging up a bit when the wheel is hindered by a brake. Going between these two designs really highligted the behavior for me.

Instead of getting a floater, I dropped 50lbs off of my rear shock spring and I've had no complaints at all with how the bike brakes these days.

With or without a brake arm, I've still only ridden one other bike that comes anywhere near the DHR in overall ride quality (M3). You'll be a happy camper either way.
 

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Guess I cant add anything to sway the sale (good call BTW), but ill add that I also felt the need to get a floater based on all my understanding of bikes learned from the internet. When I called turner Casey cave me very good explination why the DHR really doesnt need the floater. Now being on my second season on the DHR, i dont believe i'd want one.
 

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oly said:
When I called turner Casey cave me very good explination why the DHR really doesnt need the floater. Now being on my second season on the DHR, i dont believe i'd want one.
What were his reasons?
 

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from what i remember it had to do with pivot location being very low. unlike most other SP bikes that have the pivot in the "proflex/k2" sweetspot thats in line with the midlde ring.

Like you said there may be times when the system could help... i just havent ever cursed myself for not getting one.....
 

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I think there is a reason you don't see pros running too many floating brakes on DH bikes. It adds weight, and brakes only make you slower :) There are a lot of DHRs at the races w/out floating brakes, and most of them are under some pretty fast riders who are still paying for their bikes out of their own pockets. I think that speaks volumes about what kind of bike the DHR is. I love my new 6 Pack, but DHRs sure make me jealous....
 

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The way I see it, the better rider you become, the less you'll notice the 'harsh' ride when you grab the rear brake. If you grab a handful of rear brake on some braking bumps before a corner, be prepared to get a bit of a thrashing. Brake in a straight line and on smooth terrain (if it's available). The DHR is a racer's bike so keep that in mind when you're riding it. I'm still trying to find the limits of the bike as it just gets more fun and responds better the harder I push it. You definitely won't be dissapointed with the purchase of your new DHR!

Put the cash you wanted to spend on a floating brake into some good tires; you'll see a much greater benefit.
 
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