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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why are people still using tube and tire? I love my tubeless. I haven’t had a flat since. Before, I would have a flat weekly due to the terrain. So what’s the deal?
 

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flankwood said:
Why are people still using tube and tire? I love my tubeless. I haven't had a flat since. Before, I would have a flat weekly due to the terrain. So what's the deal?
i can see a couple reasons

- less choice in tire
- harder to work with, put on, take off, etc...
- doesn't save you from punctures anyways (if you don't use sealant)
- argueably heavier
- perhaps not as supple a casing since tubeless tires are thicker? (i'm stretching here)

GL,
-don
 

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i like rocks
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i'd really LOVE to go tubeless, but i just can't give up being able to swap tires around. as it is right now i change tires at least weekly from the m-f urban tires to the weekend trail tires. yeah, i could buy another set of wheels (and rotors, and cassette.....), but even then i run diffrent trail tires depending on where i'm going.

its just not practicle.
 

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a.k.a. BicycleKicks
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I think it is practical

euroford said:
i'd really LOVE to go tubeless, but i just can't give up being able to swap tires around. as it is right now i change tires at least weekly from the m-f urban tires to the weekend trail tires. yeah, i could buy another set of wheels (and rotors, and cassette.....), but even then i run diffrent trail tires depending on where i'm going.

its just not practicle.
O.k. with sealant you have to be careful not to make a mess... true... but with Hutchinson tubeless light tires or some other true tubeles tire without sealant I find that swapping tires is very easy.
 

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blehargh said:
i can see a couple reasons

- less choice in tire
- harder to work with, put on, take off, etc...
- doesn't save you from punctures anyways (if you don't use sealant)
- argueably heavier
- perhaps not as supple a casing since tubeless tires are thicker? (i'm stretching here)

GL,
-don
were talking about UST tubless, right?

-There are enough tire choices sure there could be more but there are enough that there is something for everyone.
-once you put them on you just leave them on cause you will never get a flat. Besides it's not all that hard to mount and inflate UST once you get the hang of it.
-no pinch flats and UST tires are harder to puncture and self seal with sealant. Personally I don't even need the sealant and I havent had a flat ever with UST goinig on 2 seasons.
-not any heavier than a regular tire AND a regular tube. Give or take a few grams.
-can be run at lower pressure so they are much more supple than regular tires.

Why Not? I think for most it will come down to cost. If you already have a bling wheel set that's not UST are you gonna rebuild it just for UST. Probably not cause it's good but you can easily get by with regular tires and tubes. Same with some riders and disc brakes. I know a few folks who won't upgrade to discs cause they would need to change hubs or weld a tab on their frame and they think rim brakes are just fine. Remember it's not about the bike it's about the rider. If the rider has fun than it's all good. But for the record UST is a very good system that works well and is very trail worthy.
 

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Maida7 said:
were talking about UST tubless, right?
Heh. Dude. I run tubeless. I'm in your camp. I'm just listing some possible valid reasons why someone might stay with a tube tired. I think that they are all valid reasons. Obviously, you and I think tubeless is better, but those are all fairly valid reasons for someone to stick with tubes...

-don
 

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sorry to hijack the thread, but I haven't used tubelss yet

so I thought I may answer. Mainly because the terrain here hasn't given me a ton of popped tubes. In fact, I had a set of tubes that lasted as long as the my last tires without ever popping. I guess I don't ride as hard as a lot of you.

So to answer your question, some haven't changed because if it ain't broke, it doesn't get fixed. Having never used the tubeless, I didn't understand the hype (since I had minimal problems). So many of the discussed advantages, didn't seem like they would make a big difference to me.

I did however just get my first set of UST wheels a couple weeks ago second hand, and just getting my arms around the concept of going tubeless with one of my bikes...to see how different it is. Now here are my questions.

The manual with the wheels says to use only UST tires if used without tubes. But here it seems a lot of guys have installed standard tires without tubes...and not had problems. What gives? Can you do this with any standard tire? What provisions do you have to make to install non UST tires on UST rims without tubes? Is there an advantage to install non UST tires instead of just buying UST and using them as the manual directs?

If I can use standard tires and no tubes, I already have 2 sets of tires I can use. If I have to use UST, I will have to buy a set.

Looking forward to going tubeless!
Thanks
 

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dh1 said:
so I thought I may answer. Mainly because the terrain here hasn't given me a ton of popped tubes. In fact, I had a set of tubes that lasted as long as the my last tires without ever popping. I guess I don't ride as hard as a lot of you.

So to answer your question, some haven't changed because if it ain't broke, it doesn't get fixed. Having never used the tubeless, I didn't understand the hype (since I had minimal problems). So many of the discussed advantages, didn't seem like they would make a big difference to me.

I did however just get my first set of UST wheels a couple weeks ago second hand, and just getting my arms around the concept of going tubeless with one of my bikes...to see how different it is. Now here are my questions.

The manual with the wheels says to use only UST tires if used without tubes. But here it seems a lot of guys have installed standard tires without tubes...and not had problems. What gives? Can you do this with any standard tire? What provisions do you have to make to install non UST tires on UST rims without tubes? Is there an advantage to install non UST tires instead of just buying UST and using them as the manual directs?

If I can use standard tires and no tubes, I already have 2 sets of tires I can use. If I have to use UST, I will have to buy a set.

Looking forward to going tubeless!
Thanks
The main advantage for tubeless is to get really low pressures for better traction without pinch flatting, which happens when you run low pressures with tubed tires.

You can run non-UST tires tubeless, but you need to use a sealant like Stan's or the DT Swiss kit. Some non-UST tire/rim combos work better than others. You need to do some research into this.

okay, now here are my opinions.

- I'm nervous about running non UST tires with sealant. It was never designed for this, but there are definitely a lot of people out there that have had success with it. It's not for me.

- regular tubeless doesn't save you from punctures. True, the casing is thicker, but it's not foolproof. If you ever try mounting a UST tire, it's a pain in the ass. I can imagine it's even more of a pain in the field. I always run with sealant.

- I get the best of both worlds and run Bontrager tubeless ready tires. Light weight, UST bead, has to use sealant that I already put in. Limited tires sure, but they offer enough of a range for my purposes.

GL,
-don
 

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I recently considered going tubeless with a new bike but decided against it for two reasons: Firstly because I do maintenence inside my apartment, and don't want sealant running everywhere. Secondly, I'm going to be riding my bike in very remote countries and areas where fixing a tubless could prove very difficult- tubes are much simpler to deal with here.

I read up on the pros and cons, and decided that for my area and my riding requirements, tubeless just didn't offer any significant improvement over tubes, and have some pretty big downsides.
 

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flankwood said:
Why are people still using tube and tire? I love my tubeless. I haven't had a flat since. Before, I would have a flat weekly due to the terrain. So what's the deal?
If you already run "low" pressures and rarely pinch flat there is no real reason to go tubeless. Both apply to me. I do run UST tires on occasion and the main thing I like about them is it is easier and faster to change tires than with tubed tires--unless I am using tubeless ready tires that require sealant. I rarely get thorn punctures either so sealant is not needed.
 

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womble said:
I recently considered going tubeless with a new bike but decided against it for two reasons: Firstly because I do maintenence inside my apartment, and don't want sealant running everywhere. Secondly, I'm going to be riding my bike in very remote countries and areas where fixing a tubless could prove very difficult- tubes are much simpler to deal with here.

I read up on the pros and cons, and decided that for my area and my riding requirements, tubeless just didn't offer any significant improvement over tubes, and have some pretty big downsides.
UST tires and rims do not require sealant. To fix a flat on the trail you just remove the valve from the rim and install a tube. No big deal.
 

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shiggy said:
UST tires and rims do not require sealant. To fix a flat on the trail you just remove the valve from the rim and install a tube. No big deal.
I'd then want to carry two tubes which seems to kind of defeat the point. Even though I don't flat often, I like the idea that tubes are easily patched and rotated between tires.

I didn't realise that sealant was completely optional for UST rims though- that's good to know. With UST rims + UST tires, is it still tricky to get the tire inflated with a hand pump? I've read that you need to move a large volume of air to get the tires seated initially.
 

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womble said:
I'd then want to carry two tubes which seems to kind of defeat the point. Even though I don't flat often, I like the idea that tubes are easily patched and rotated between tires.

I didn't realise that sealant was completely optional for UST rims though- that's good to know. With UST rims + UST tires, is it still tricky to get the tire inflated with a hand pump? I've read that you need to move a large volume of air to get the tires seated initially.
most people either use a co2 system or compressor. If you get a flat in the field you rotate the tire so the leak is on the bottom and wiggle it around untill the sealent seals it then a hand pump will do
 

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womble said:
I'd then want to carry two tubes which seems to kind of defeat the point. Even though I don't flat often, I like the idea that tubes are easily patched and rotated between tires.

I didn't realise that sealant was completely optional for UST rims though- that's good to know. With UST rims + UST tires, is it still tricky to get the tire inflated with a hand pump? I've read that you need to move a large volume of air to get the tires seated initially.
I always carry at least two tubes. The only UST flat I have had on the trail required a tube because it was the valve that was damaged.

Floor pumps work just fine with UST tires. A mini pump probably will not work but they are for emergency on-trail use only (when you would use a tube any way).
 

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Shiggy, Dan, thanks for the info. Looks like I made the right decision to stick with tubes for my needs.
 

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go to the Stans web site they give you all the options. most of my friends run tubed, a couple run reg. tires on reg rims with stans and a stans rim strip. I've only seen them get a flat once, but it was messy, they had to pull the rim strip, clean out as much stans as they could and install a tube. then they had to carry all the crap out too. I just got a pair of wtb weirwolfs ust for my mavic ust rims. I installed them but havent ridden them yet as I'm using studs untill spring on my other bike. but I installed them without stans, they have held their pressure for a week now.
from what I can tell the only advantage is lower pressure. weight is the same or higher, repairs, while less often are harder to fix. But I got the ust rims so I might as well try them and see.
 

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Only disadvantage that I've found running ghetto tubeless is that swapping tires around for different conditions sucks because of the mess....

So now I have 4 sets of wheels to cover 2 bikes :)
 

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Guys who dont have thorns on their local trail tubes are fine. I pulled two thorn out
last night and one tonight, If I was not running Stans no tubes in the wheel I would have been fixing a flat. Stans is good if your trails are littered with thorns. I have not had a flat in a year. I used to flat 6 times a month. If you got thorns on your rides you will eventually
be a stans user.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
tubless good

OK well what I was reffering to was people who opt not to have tubeless. I only got a set of mavic tubless rims because my shimano's bearings went out under warranty. I only paid 60 euro for the wheels. I have hutch pythons for my summer tires and they are fast. I always use sealant and here is why: Got a flat? Just pull the thorn if there is one and roll the tire over the hole. As you pump the tire the sealant rushes to the hole and fixes it up. I also have it since I got a dent in my rim. I aint paying 220 euro for a new set so I let the sealant hold this up too. As far as using a non Tubless tire without a tube you gotta use sealant but I was warned not to since a tube tire's walls are a bit thinner and could shread in a hig speed corner. I have not tried using a regular tire with tubeless. I may do it for my winter set though.
 

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For me, I decided to give ghetto tubeless a shot. I've got the Bonty TR rims that came stock on my bike...so for me it was an easy thing to try...I'd have to run a sealant anyway, so...

As a Clyde, I found I had to run quite high pressures to keep from pinch flatting...especially as I advanced in my skills and became more agressive. Made for a bit of a pain in the bouncy stuff. Running tubeless, I can keep a little more reasonable tire pressure for a more pliant tire and better traction & control without the pinchflats.

Personally, if I could find a good design for the local conditions that came in UST and that I could get locally (the LBS's don't carry a lot of UST tires), I might go proper tubeless...but until then, I think I'll keep running one of the recommended tire mfgr's rubber and Stan's.
 
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