Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm attempting my first tubeless conversion. Wheelset: Black Flag expert. Tire: Ardent Folding 2.25. I get the tire off (needed to use a set of levers), check that the factory installed yellow rim tape is intact, install a tubeless valve, replace tire (no lever needed) and for the life of me can't get the bead to set. Tried, using soapy water, tried putting in sealant. Only thing I haven't done is find a real compressor. Is that my problem, or is there something else I'm missing? I was hoping that a tubeless-ready Stan's licensed rim would make this easy.

Assuming I don't want to have to use a compressor in the future, should I switch to UST or TNT tires?
 

·
> /dev/null 2&>1
Joined
·
3,824 Posts
By can't get the bead to seat I assume you mean you're stuck at zero pressure. .. As opposed to the situation where you're pressured up but part of the bead is sitting below the rim.

Some tire / rim combinations can be finicky but usually will seat without a compressor with some work.

If the bead is naturally sitting far from the rim in one or two locations you want to get it closer to the rim such that the gap is small enough to allow a buildup of pressure with the floor pump before it escapes. You just need to get past that threshold where the internal pressure is momentarily high enough to push the bead out into position. You'll notice that if you crush the tire towards the rim with your hand this also has the effect of closing the bead gap in that location. But you've only got one (free) hand, the other is needed for pumping.

To solve this you can sometimes do the following :

Place the wheel vertically on the floor apply downward pressure with your hand closing the top and bottom gap. Then straddle the wheel and apply pressure to each side with your left and right knee. Then with your free hand pump the floor pump like crazy and be persistent, it can take 2-3min of pumping where it seems like it's not going to happen and then it will magically just click and pop on. If anyone walks in on you during this process it can look a little weird so make sure to have a good story so you don't get reported for tire molestation.

If this fails you can take a new tire to the gas station and air it up, and usually after sitting pumped up for a few hours, 'rubber memory' kicks in and the tire will seat more easily with a floor pump after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
Go to harbor freight, but a $40-$50 air compressor. There hasn't been a tire I haven't been able to seat with soapy water and an air compressor.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,549 Posts
Personally, I would only use a tubeless ready tire. That said, first seat the tire by putting a tube in and seating the beads. Then remove the tube and put the tubeless valve back in. By doing this you will only be trying to get one beat to seat instead of two.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD so please forgive the typos that occur when typing with two fingers.
 

·
I like bikes.
Joined
·
309 Posts
A strong air compressor with high cfm volume generally does the trick. With the nozzle on stem pumping air, you can try to wiggle and bump tire on ground to help the seat. The air should push the tir e outward against the outer walls. At 20psi, I would stop and work tire with hands to finalize seat before bumping up pressure.

If you seat with a tube first, pump tire up to 60psi and it should seat on it's own. Becareful to keep fingers and skin away from the rim edges. When the tire seats, it pops/snaps into place and will cut/pinch your skin if caught just right.

SOAPY SOLUTION THOUGHTS...
I would highly recommend not using soapy water on an aluminum rim! Coated or not, it can/will cause corrosion!
They have specific soap for wheels. I think bikes are soy, but you can get car wheel soap solution for much cheaper in greater quantities fwiw. You can get the stuff at NAPA.
Wheel soap dries up to basically a fine powder and is gone within a week or 2. Regular dish or hand soap will be permanent.

lastly, just because a wheel has not corroded on you when using hand or dish soap, doesn't mean that it can't. The residue is still there regardless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks so much for all the replies.

So I did my darndest with my mid volume floor pump contorting myself into all sorts of strange positions, and then gave up, put the wheel in the car and took it to a gas station. OF course, as soon as I got the wheel out I remembered that I hadn't brought a schraeder adapter (*&%) - so I took out the valve core and hoped for the best pressing the schrader head against the presta valve. Sure nuff it popped but good. Took it home, filled it with stan's through the valve and was able to get it to stay inflated with the hand pump.

Unfortunately I didn't see the post about corrosion, but everything I've read just says to use regular diluted dish soap. Hopefully it will be OK. Maybe I'll pick up a compressor at HF, but I'm beginning to feel like my bikes are sucking a bit too much cash out of my wallet. Looking at upcoming service intervals on the Fox shocks is making me nervous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,302 Posts
I've always had to use a compressor with Ardents, on several rims. Ikons inflate on the first pump of a floor pump. Go figure, different tires seem to work differently. Cary's technique works too.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top