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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are your thoughts? I am in the midst of a tire situation so may not be the most rational, ha.

My son got a pin hole in his tubeless tire and would not seal up with sealant and looking like a bacon strip and additional sealant is not working either. It's a Brood maxtion tire, which has chunky tread, but the rest of the tire is fairly thin and flexible, so I'm thinking this is what makes it difficult to seal. The wheels also are fairly heavy and not that good. They leak a lot of air between rides.

Also it's quicker to just slap a tube in than to mess around with trying to reseal the tubeless and failing and then slap the tube in because it failed.

Also my older son got a new bike and I haven't switched it over to tubeless yet.

It seems like the verdict is still out on which is faster/less rolling resistance. And I don't know if they really need the extra traction given that the kids don't weigh that much. And they are used to BMX bikes and high pressure tires. So with front suspension I don't think they really need anymore cushioning.
 

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If my son had no need for increased traction - I’d stay with tubes. We run tubeless in one of my sons bikes because he mtbs with me and I was also trying to keep weight low on his 24” wheeled hard tail. I’ve only had to add sealant once in three years and luckily no punctures that wouldn’t seal - he’s running Rocket Rons. My older sons bike hasn’t been converted yet as I need to pick up a set of better tires first.
 

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I keep my daughter's bike tubeless for traction and rolling resistance but she's on a 27.5 plus tire. Probably much less of a gain on a 24 "tire especially if it's pretty narrow. You could patch it from the inside and continue to run tubeless. Bacon Strips usually work for me on larger punctures but I did have a thorn puncture on one of my daughters old bikes that just wouldn't seal due to the weird angle of the puncture through a large tread lug. Also, doesn't hurt anything to just throw a tube in it for now and give it some more thought about repairing it or replacing it later.
 

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This is an easy choice where I live because without tubeless you would simply have to walk, because there's so many thorns. Or if you are lucky, you make it home and spend your evenings patching tubes.

I find that running Stans in tubes does wonders for small thorn punctures. Way better than tubes alone, but tubeless with stans is another level, basically superpowers at least for thorns.

It's purely about which is less hassle for you and if tubes are less hassle then run tubes. My son's 26er is still running tubes with Stans in them and luckily has been doing ok that way. If he does get a puncture that stans won't seal then I just swap in a tube and roll.
 

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Note the Brood Maxtion tires come in a DH version and non-DH version. We had like 5 flats in about 5 Whistler Bike Park days with the 20" non-DH version (tubeless). Once we moved to the DH version, maybe 1 flat in several months? We now run 20" Vee Flow Snap tires which are waaaaaay better for traction, for climbing and downhill, and for big drops.

With all this, and with my other son's and my own bikes, I'm a bacon-strip master and can have a bacon strip repair done in about the same time as a tube swap (~5 mins). The hardest part about using bacon strips for me is finding the hole - or holes (plural) cuz sometimes there's a second one at the rim as well; with a tube repair you don't need to find any holes. But I hate fixing a tubeless flat with a tube cuz of the mess and have been lucky that I only had to do it once out of the ~10 flats my kids and I have had overs several years. FWIW I only use Stan's Race sealant.

That all being said, it's a real pain in the butt dealing with and maintaining tubeless tires w/r/t sealant, adding sealant, always having to re-inflate tires cuz it seems all sidewalls leak slowly over one of a few days. Life was so much easier with just tubes. I'd say if you want convenience, and your child isn't materially limited by the disadvantages of tubeless, then it's not worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Note the Brood Maxtion tires come in a DH version and non-DH version.
These must be the non-DH ones, which is what I would want, I guess. We may hit a lift park for the first time this year, but mostly we are on flowy XC trails. The boys are jumping some big stuff, though.

If I want to go tubeless again, I'll look into some different tires I guess.

I have a tube in there now, so we'll see how it goes.
 

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Once I had my first tubeless wheelset, flats became a thing of the past. Before that, I would get a flat at least every other ride. If one of my bikes is expected to go off road for any amount of time, it has a tubeless setup.

I've only had to add sealant once in three years
Dude, that's some seriously long lived sealant! I thought at first that sealant was just good forever. Then I swapped a tire and saw that everything had just dried up in there, so I had been riding sealant free for who knows how long. I stay on top of checking it now, and I only get a few months before I have to top off a tire.
 

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It seems like the verdict is still out on which is faster/less rolling resistance. And I don't know if they really need the extra traction given that the kids don't weigh that much. And they are used to BMX bikes and high pressure tires. So with front suspension I don't think they really need anymore cushioning.
Actually, the verdict isn't still out, at least regarding rolling resistance. Tubeless does have lower rolling resistance, fact. Traction could still be up for debate, I guess.

If they ride more than a couple times a week, it's worth it. If it's worth it for me, it's worth it for them. When kids are learning, it's important for it to be an enjoyable experience and anything that helps them keep up with others that we can reasonable afford is worth it.

Anyways, lots of reasons to run tubeless for kids. The only reason I wouldn't (and sometimes haven't) is when it simply isn't possible on the rims they have and the cost of a new wheel set is too high, or rims aren't available in tubeless.
 

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depends on bike rims /tyre combo; I have Early rider 16' that is impossible or close to impossible to set up tubeless - so tubes;

All that goes with 20 inch and upper, I tried to set up tubeless asap, just to prevent punctures

Traction wise - irrelevant, since typically tire super tough for kid weight, so they can run minimum PSI and still have shitty traction;
 

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We ran tubeless for a year on 20" and then I haven't been able to find Crown Vee tires for either his HT or FS bike since they wore out last winter, so got Maxx Daddy tires that I can't run tubeless. And he didn't notice, except the grip is way, WAY better. If I did it again, instead of going to all the trouble to convert to tubeless, I'd just get 20" Tubolitos. We're in Bellingham, where trails tend to be slippery and rooty.
 

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We ran tubeless for a year on 20" and then I haven't been able to find Crown Vee tires for either his HT or FS bike since they wore out last winter, so got Maxx Daddy tires that I can't run tubeless. And he didn't notice, except the grip is way, WAY better. If I did it again, instead of going to all the trouble to convert to tubeless, I'd just get 20" Tubolitos. We're in Bellingham, where trails tend to be slippery and rooty.
you can run non tubeless tires tubeless without issues, Kinda have trail tires in 20 size
 

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you can run non tubeless tires tubeless without issues, Kinda have trail tires in 20 size
This depends entirely on the specific setup. The tire, rim, valve, rim tape and sealant all play a role in getting a good seal and running tubeless. For instance, there is absolutely no way the non-tubeless version of the Vee Crown Gem will seal on the stock Weinmann rims on my son's Vitus Kids 24+. It just isn't going to happen, regardless of the tape or sealant used. A tubeless tire may work (and I plan to try), but the shape of the non-tubeless rim hook (or lack thereof) is definitely going to make it a challenge.
 

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This depends entirely on the specific setup. The tire, rim, valve, rim tape and sealant all play a role in getting a good seal and running tubeless. For instance, there is absolutely no way the non-tubeless version of the Vee Crown Gem will seal on the stock Weinmann rims on my son's Vitus Kids 24+. It just isn't going to happen, regardless of the tape or sealant used. A tubeless tire may work (and I plan to try), but the shape of the non-tubeless rim hook (or lack thereof) is definitely going to make it a challenge.
This is due to rims, i found ghetto tubless work for such rims

Cheers
 
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