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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I'm purchasing a Trek Superfly from a co-worker who is heavily into the sport and had this rig sitting around the past year, with only a month or two of use on it.

The bike is "tubeless ready" - what does this mean exactly? Please correct me if I'm wrong, but from what I can tell TR tires are an alternative to UST rims/tires?

From what I'm reading about TR tires, the tires are set into the rim w/ a sealant correct? I know tubeless prevents pinch flats but what about everything else? Major punctures? How are tubeless tires repaired if I do manage to puncture one? Patch kits? Should I buy some of this sealant? (Trek calls it "Super Juice"?). Do I need to buy a whole new tire?

Tubeless is the one piece of the bike I'm really not familiar with. I've never ridden a bike w/ tubeless, so any advice would be appreciated!

Thanks!
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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The wheels may be 'tubeless ready', and yet that doesn't tell you exactly how 'tubeless ready' the wheels are.

If they currently have tubes, they will need to have some rim strips installed (assuming you want to go with the method the manufacturer intended). The rim strips from Bontrager are high quality and fairly easy to install. Make sure you get the right ones. Some are made for an offset spoke bed, and others are not. Your LBS will know which ones should work correctly.

Tubeless with sealant can withstand small to a little bigger than small punctures fairly easily. Larger holes and sidewall tears are another matter and do happen (but fortunately not often). You should still carry a tube, levers, and a source of inflation.

Lots of sealants available. I would recommend using Stans until you get a fairly good track record of tubeless success going, and then you can experiment to find alternatives that you might prefer.

It's a bit more work up front, but less chance of flats on the trail. Sometimes it can get messy with a tear or burp. You have to decide if you are OK with the possible downsides. I think the upside is worth it. Some don't find it is of value to their individual situation. No right or wrong, just different.
 

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dude your awesome thanks, one more question, for now atleast. I have a 07 trek 3700 with a crap suntour sr blah blah blah and im trying to upgrade it. my bb shell is 73mm square tapered and I was trying to fid out if 73mm x 121mm spindle is typically a standard in crankset setups. just trying to find a compatible upgrade.
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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73mm is a standard width bottom bracket for mountain bikes. The "121" part is the width of the spindle, and that has to do with getting the correct chainline for your bike and the crankset you're using. Are you wanting to upgrade the crankset, the bottom bracket or both?

The correct bottom bracket width for a given setup could usually be anywhere from 108mm to 121mm.

You could probably replace your existing square taper crankset for as little as $40 to $50, but it's a crapshoot as to whether or not the chainline would be OK with your current 121mm spindle width, and that could mean having to buy a new bottom bracket for another $25 to $40. It's a gamble and I'm not sure that you wouldn't be better off just spending a little more up front for an external bearing crankset (w/BB). You use the included spacers to adjust the chainline to fit your bike.

This an example of that type of crankset and bottom bracket:

2013 FSA Gamma Drive M 10 MegaExo 175mm 24 32 42T MTB Triple Crankset Bike New | eBay

or:

Shimano FC M552 Crank and Bottom Bracket New | eBay

There are also specialty tools needed to deal with each of the different types.
 

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Ive got some of the tools, know how and, drive to get it together and im learning as much as possible. Im looking to upgrade both bb and crankset as some if not most square tapered configs differ. ie the shimano and the suntour both use squered but are incompatible as far as I can tell.

Im looking at maybe getting the Shimano deore m590 9 spd crankset w/ bb included. Or the Shimano deore m610 10spd bb included on chainreactioncycles.com

Does it matter that my bike is 10 spd (7 gear rear cassette) with acera rear derailleur. or does in not matter what kind of derailleurs I have. (although that's the next upgrade) will it work?
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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If your bike has 7 rear cogs, and three chainrings, it would be considered either a 7 speed (for the seven rear cogs), or a 21 speed (seven rear cogs multiplied by the three front chainrings).

The 590 should work fine. If you have different size chainrings, you might have to move the front derailleur up or down a little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The wheels may be 'tubeless ready', and yet that doesn't tell you exactly how 'tubeless ready' the wheels are.

If they currently have tubes, they will need to have some rim strips installed (assuming you want to go with the method the manufacturer intended). The rim strips from Bontrager are high quality and fairly easy to install. Make sure you get the right ones. Some are made for an offset spoke bed, and others are not. Your LBS will know which ones should work correctly.

Tubeless with sealant can withstand small to a little bigger than small punctures fairly easily. Larger holes and sidewall tears are another matter and do happen (but fortunately not often). You should still carry a tube, levers, and a source of inflation.

Lots of sealants available. I would recommend using Stans until you get a fairly good track record of tubeless success going, and then you can experiment to find alternatives that you might prefer.

It's a bit more work up front, but less chance of flats on the trail. Sometimes it can get messy with a tear or burp. You have to decide if you are OK with the possible downsides. I think the upside is worth it. Some don't find it is of value to their individual situation. No right or wrong, just different.
Bingo! You're first sentence basically summed up my confusion. I believe the tires ARE tubeless. I was worried that in/if the instance I do manage to blow out a tubeless tire I'd be SOL unless I invested in a whole new tire. Sounds like I can just throw a tube into the tire and I'd be good to go?
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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Bingo! You're first sentence basically summed up my confusion. I believe the tires ARE tubeless. I was worried that in/if the instance I do manage to blow out a tubeless tire I'd be SOL unless I invested in a whole new tire. Sounds like I can just throw a tube into the tire and I'd be good to go?
So long as the hole isn't so large that the tube would come through, yes. If it's a large hole/tear, you'll be buying a new tire just like you would if it had a tube in it. The good news is that that rarely happens and you'll just need a tube until you get your tubeless set up again.
 
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