Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I thought that tubeless tires was a pretty recent invention for bikes, but my dad (who's 54) seems to think that there were tubeless bike tires (and I don't mean solid tires) back when he was a kid. Is this true? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
I think both of you are talking about tubular tires. These are the ones where the carcass is sewn around a cotton wrapped inner tube with rim tape glued over the stitching. You mount them to the rims using more glue.

These tires are known for their supple ride quality, part of which apparently has to do with the perfectly round shape of the tire's cross-section. I personally think it has more to do with the extremely low profile nature of most tubular tire rims, made possible by the lack of a clinching mechanism on the rims.

Tubular tires are similar to tubeless tires in that a goo is needed at installation and that they are less prone to pinch flats. Otherwise I think this is the wrong tree to be barking at. Please leave the trees alone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48,238 Posts
You are partly correct.

Tubular (sewup) tires do have an inner tube sewn into the casing. The casing can be cotton, nylon and/or silk (and some other fibers).

They do NOT need "goo", though some companies sell a sealant to fix punctures.

Many people think tubular tires are tubeless because you do not add an inner tube to use them. They do have inner tubes inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
By goo, I meant the rim cement for tubular tires. I personally stopped using tubulars 2 years ago when my stock of tires ran out. After moving back to Canada from Japan, I find it's just too expensive to keep using them here.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top