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About two years ago, you could send them to Pedros. For every so many you sent them, you would get a blowout seat pack in exchange. However, they canned that program October 2006.

I did some quick research and found out that Alchemy Goods (http://www.alchemygoods.com/index.html) does recycling for their messenger bags. Their website says something about giving your shops name and getting pre-paid labels in return though. Give the tubes to your shop and ask them to be proactive and reactive, I guess.

Hope that helps a little bit!

-Rob
 

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Mynamesrob said:
I did some quick research and found out that Alchemy Goods (http://www.alchemygoods.com/index.html) does recycling for their messenger bags. Their website says something about giving your shops name and getting pre-paid labels in return though. Give the tubes to your shop and ask them to be proactive and reactive, I guess.

Hope that helps a little bit!

-Rob
Unfortunately, it is almost useless. They accept only MTB tubes WITHOUT SEALANT .
 

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womble said:
And that is a problem, why? Most tubes don't have sealant.
They should! Sealant spares lot of time and work - let alone tubes. In the summer I often get more than 10 punctures per ride(that is, punctures I know about) - and, with some help, the sealant heals them all. Probably, there are 10 more I don't even pay attention to. It is kind of common place - recommending newbies to fill their tubes with sealant. For road riding, sealant is less crucial, as most of the flats come from broken glass or pieces of metal - so tire liners are more efficient here. But again, the firm accepts MTB tires only - so, I guess, for majority of riders, it is not much of help.
 

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I use them around the house/bike

magili said:
hi

iwm looking for some info about tube recycling. does anyone have aclue on how, who and where?

thanks
I cut them into long strips and use them as a poor-man's chainstay protector (works better than lizard skins, too).

I've seen people do the same thing on their fork legs (not stancion tubes) to prevent them from being damaged during dirt jumping, bailouts, etc.

I'll patch mine until the entire tube is a big patch. Just use good patches and you're all set.

AJ
 

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mcseforsale said:
I cut them into long strips and use them as a poor-man's chainstay protector (works better than lizard skins, too).

I've seen people do the same thing on their fork legs (not stancion tubes) to prevent them from being damaged during dirt jumping, bailouts, etc.

I'll patch mine until the entire tube is a big patch. Just use good patches and you're all set.

AJ
I patch mine as well. If I do it at home, I use patches cut out of an old tube( recycling as well). Also, this way I make the tubes live longer. Unlike prefabricated patches, tube rubber doesn't change shape of the tube, so the wheel won't bounce. The downside - the rubber takes long to stick up(usually I leave the tubes for 24 hrs under some kind of pressure). For chain stay protector, though, I prefer pieces of tire. My rear mech all the time hits the chain stay, so a piece of tube won't hold on for long.
 
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