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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been interested in building some frames and forks for myself for some time now. Looking to built a hardtail and a single pivot fs. Been googling around and done some research on this forum. Nova Cycles and Paragon has pretty much everything I need to get started, but having a hard time finding some specific rigid fork dropouts and rear dropouts like the ones used on single pivot designs such as the older Santa Cruz Superlight. Something similar to those would work.

These seem to be popular and I've seen different versions of knockoffs. Looks like they're all made in China by the same company. I just need the dropouts and maybe the crown:

These guys looks like the supplier of the fork.
https://www.alibaba.com/product-free/245555826/bike_Fork_MTB_Fork_Model_WB.html
If I can't find those dropouts, does anyone carry a disc specific fork dropouts. At this time I don't want plain fork dropouts and then have to weld the disc brake mount separately.

For the rear I'm looking for something like these:


Thanks in advance.
 

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Bike Dork
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If you have the skills to make a frame you should have the skills to make your own dropouts. If you can't make your own dropouts don't think about making your own frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
themanmonkey said:
If you have the skills to make a frame you should have the skills to make your own dropouts. If you can't make your own dropouts don't think about making your own frame.
If you have the skills to speak, you should have the skills to communicate with fellow human beings properly, otherwise STFU! I didn't know the first time Michael Jordan picked up the basketball he was shooting game winning shots and winning NBA champions. I'm sure the first frame that YOU built was ridden by Lance to win all 7 tours.:rolleyes: Those guys spent lots of time honing their skills, which is something I hope I can do.

Right now, I have no skills whatsoever to make my own frames. I'm just a newb that wants to learn how to build just like the rest of you were when you first started. I'm hoping someday I can be as good as some you guys and then maybe this might not be the right line of work for me. You gotta start somewhere though, right? Cycling is my passion and I love working with my hands to build stuff so why not give it a shot.

I'm just trying to start on a small budget. I don't a CNC for making my own dropouts and I can't afford one. If I get good enough, I might consider buying my own . Right now, I just wanna find dropouts for my project. If you can help, thanks.
 

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kosayno said:
If you have the skills to speak, you should have the skills to communicate with fellow human beings properly, otherwise STFU!
And if you had the skills to read you'd see the link you posted to the "supplier" clearly says that they are a trading agent.

And with that attitude, that's all the help you'll get from me.
 

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kosayno said:
If you have the skills to speak, you should have the skills to communicate with fellow human beings properly, otherwise STFU! .
And now you've shown that you don't deserve any help with an attitude like that. MJ didn't ask a bunch of folks to dribble the ball for him he went out and did it. Get a little humility and some perspective and you might get some help. Otherwise, good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
themanmonkey said:
And now you've shown that you don't deserve any help with an attitude like that. MJ didn't ask a bunch of folks to dribble the ball for him he went out and did it. Get a little humility and some perspective and you might get some help. Otherwise, good luck.
I admit I got a bit defensive. If you were gonna offer any help, you would've done that in the first place instead of making discouraging remarks about my lack of skills. like I said, I have no experience. Just trying to start somewhere. Telling me I have no business building frames before I've even built one doesn't help much. Serious question, did you honestly built your own dropout for your first frame?

And if you had the skills to read you'd see the link you posted to the "supplier" clearly says that they are a trading agent.

And with that attitude, that's all the help you'll get from me.
I know they're a trading agent. I was using them as reference to the dropouts I wanted. The question of the OP was help finding similar dropouts.
 

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kosayno said:
I admit I got a bit defensive. If you were gonna offer any help, you would've done that in the first place instead of making discouraging remarks about my lack of skills. like I said, I have no experience. Just trying to start somewhere. Telling me I have no business building frames before I've even built one doesn't help much. Serious question, did you honestly built your own dropout for your first frame?

I know they're a trading agent. I was using them as reference to the dropouts I wanted. The question of the OP was help finding similar dropouts.
I agree with you, It was a pointless hit and run on TMM's part. I read your post this morning but did not have any answers for you so I didn't reply, It was that easy..........
On another note though, you don't specify in your post what material you plan on using for the frame or fork.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
j-ro said:
I agree with you, It was a pointless hit and run on TMM's part. I read your post this morning but did not have any answers for you so I didn't reply, It was that easy..........
On another note though, you don't specify in your post what material you plan on using for the frame or fork.
Either aluminum or steel. Preferably aluminum.
 

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I'm not trying to be negative; just presenting the facts:
1)You're not going to find the fork drop-outs
2)You're not going to find the fork crown
3)You're not going to find the rear drop-outs stock.

That said, read on:
1)Those forks are made as a single casting. What looks to be a "plug-in" style drop-out is actually a single, integral fork leg. It is not joined at the bottom--including the disk mount. All one piece.
2)You will not find a fork crown that looks like that. Those designs are manufacturer/model specific. You're more likely to work with this: http://tinyurl.com/5554u4 Others have made forks completely out of straight-gauge 4130 tube, but it is always remarked as being an overly complicated, time-consuming and difficult task. Read: not good for a first build, lots of compound angles, like this: http://tinyurl.com/y9b4zwr In such case, you would need to go this route, http://tinyurl.com/y8tutod and add the disk mount as a braze-on (as you already mention in the OP).
3) There are sooo many drop-outs regularly available that you could use. Sure, they may not look just like those, but there are plenty with a lot of beef on the ends to modify and shape to your needs. If you want those, however, you would probably get them cut (i.e. waterjet). Otherwise you need a manual mill. But there are so many available options that I would discourage this for a first build.

Lastly- please stick to a hard-tail for now. Pivots, suspension mounts and rear linkages are not sold as 'parts'. They must be individually fabricated. Everything for a hard-tail can be bought piece-meal from the suppliers you already mention.

"Looks easier than it is" ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Arrak Thumrs said:
I'm not trying to be negative; just presenting the facts:
1)You're not going to find the fork drop-outs
2)You're not going to find the fork crown
3)You're not going to find the rear drop-outs stock.

That said, read on:
1)Those forks are made as a single casting. What looks to be a "plug-in" style drop-out is actually a single, integral fork leg. It is not joined at the bottom--including the disk mount. All one piece.
2)You will not find a fork crown that looks like that. Those designs are manufacturer/model specific. You're more likely to work with this: http://tinyurl.com/5554u4 Others have made forks completely out of straight-gauge 4130 tube, but it is always remarked as being an overly complicated, time-consuming and difficult task. Read: not good for a first build, lots of compound angles, like this: http://tinyurl.com/y9b4zwr In such case, you would need to go this route, http://tinyurl.com/y8tutod and add the disk mount as a braze-on (as you already mention in the OP).
3) There are sooo many drop-outs regularly available that you could use. Sure, they may not look just like those, but there are plenty with a lot of beef on the ends to modify and shape to your needs. If you want those, however, you would probably get them cut (i.e. waterjet). Otherwise you need a manual mill. But there are so many available options that I would discourage this for a first build.

Lastly- please stick to a hard-tail for now. Pivots, suspension mounts and rear linkages are not sold as 'parts'. They must be individually fabricated. Everything for a hard-tail can be bought piece-meal from the suppliers you already mention.

"Looks easier than it is" ;)
Thanks for the info. I knew if I could get what I wanted it would be hard, but I had to try anyways. I was figuring on working on the hardtail until I felt comfortable enough to move to forks and fs designs...that is if I don't kill myself on my first frame. :D Right now I don't want to put the money down for my own mill.
 

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Arrak Thumrs said:
I'm not trying to be negative; just presenting the facts:
1)You're not going to find the fork drop-outs
2)You're not going to find the fork crown
3)You're not going to find the rear drop-outs stock.

That said, read on:
1)Those forks are made as a single casting. What looks to be a "plug-in" style drop-out is actually a single, integral fork leg. It is not joined at the bottom--including the disk mount. All one piece.
2)You will not find a fork crown that looks like that. Those designs are manufacturer/model specific. You're more likely to work with this: http://tinyurl.com/5554u4 Others have made forks completely out of straight-gauge 4130 tube, but it is always remarked as being an overly complicated, time-consuming and difficult task. Read: not good for a first build, lots of compound angles, like this: http://tinyurl.com/y9b4zwr In such case, you would need to go this route, http://tinyurl.com/y8tutod and add the disk mount as a braze-on (as you already mention in the OP).
3) There are sooo many drop-outs regularly available that you could use. Sure, they may not look just like those, but there are plenty with a lot of beef on the ends to modify and shape to your needs. If you want those, however, you would probably get them cut (i.e. waterjet). Otherwise you need a manual mill. But there are so many available options that I would discourage this for a first build.

Lastly- please stick to a hard-tail for now. Pivots, suspension mounts and rear linkages are not sold as 'parts'. They must be individually fabricated. Everything for a hard-tail can be bought piece-meal from the suppliers you already mention.

"Looks easier than it is" ;)
All good advice but I need to correct you on the issue of the fork, I have that fork(except mine says '29' on it) and it is decidely not one piece, unless they figured out how to pour a little aluminum into the mold followed by some carbon fiber followed by more aluminum.........................
 

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j-ro said:
All good advice but I need to correct you on the issue of the fork, I have that fork(except mine says '29' on it) and it is decidely not one piece, unless they figured out how to pour a little aluminum into the mold followed by some carbon fiber followed by more aluminum.........................
Not to take a further wizz on the brush fire here, but changing the length for a 29er would be an fairly easy mfg task. Most likely it is done on a machine and once setup or programed just push the button.
 

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crux said:
Not to take a further wizz on the brush fire here, but changing the length for a 29er would be an fairly easy mfg task. Most likely it is done on a machine and once setup or just push the button.
ARE YOU FRICKEN SERIOUS?!!! my point is that it is a CARBON TUBED fork, BONDED to ALUMINUM DROPOUTS and CROWN.
Not a one piece job as Arrak Thumrs tried to point out.
 

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No I gave perfectly good advice. MAKE YOUR OWN. Get some paper and trace the dropouts you like and then cut them out of 3/8" steel. If you don't have the ability to do that you should not try making a bike period. That's the fact of the matter.
 

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Lovely, all of this. :bluefrown:
Why so much high stress here?! :incazzato:

I didn't pay much attention to the link's details. There are plenty of others that are single piece construction; however, I failed to pay too much attention to the materials on that particular one. It doesn't matter. You're still not going to find any of it.

As to D-O fabrication methods, my favorite quote is by an engineering student who once remarked, "Almost anything can be made with a piece of metal and a file... if given enough time :p " True, true, true... haha!

Best of luck with navigating it all. I might recommend one of the more noob-friendly "Frame Forums" ;) Also digging through the archives dilligently (but I'm sure you already knew that:thumbsup:!)
 

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j-ro said:
ARE YOU FRICKEN SERIOUS?!!! my point is that it is a CARBON TUBED fork, BONDED to ALUMINUM DROPOUTS and CROWN.
Not a one piece job as Arrak Thumrs tried to point out.
OK everyone never attempt to point out simple mfg processes with j-ro on the board. Apparently he is a little sensitive. Does not matter if the fork is a single piece or fabricated out of 20,000 different strands the are still effectively still a bike fork.
 

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crux said:
OK everyone never attempt to point out simple mfg processes with j-ro on the board. Apparently he is a little sensitive. Does not matter if the fork is a single piece or fabricated out of 20,000 different strands the are still effectively still a bike fork.
Next time start at the top of the thread and read the whole thing, then if you have something pertaining to the post add it in.
heres what you did';
-dude is looking for specific dropouts

-other dude says 'cant have em, its a one piece fork

-I say 'no it is'nt i have one just like it and it is carbon and aluminum

-you say,"Not to take a further wizz on the brush fire here, but changing the length for a 29er would be an fairly easy mfg task. Most likely it is done on a machine and once setup or programed just push the button"?

So are you right about it being a simple task, well yes,yes you are. Does it have anything to do with anything in this post? no, no it doesn't
OK, maybe I shouldn't have shouted but I get sick of these threads where somone new to the whole gig comes in and asks a simple question and gets slammed by someone with 4 months more experience. Just answer the question or let the tread die, no need to be a dickaboutit.
 

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wow. Some stress here.

To the OP. You phrase things in a certain way, and said it doesn't matter if the parts are steel or aluminum. These are clues (wrong or right) that you might be just a dreamer. Still, I think TMM's reply was a little harsh. I can remember back when he was asking equally "dreamer" questions on Josh Putnam's mailing list in the early to mid 90's :D

My (edit, no longer short) answer to your original question:

The rear dropouts: use something off the shelf. it avoids the additional time/steps/skills to make your own and they will work fine on a hardtail. Alternately, make your own, or pay to have them made to your design. those are probably the options. If you really want a high chainstay style dropout, you might be able to cleverly modify a surly disc dropout.

Front: best shot at that is Ceeway's 1.125" plug in (they have them in 2 different offsets even) combined with an old bolt on suspension fork crown that is close enough to the right size for the tubing you pick that you can silver a shim on the tube, or ream the hole, or use a metric tube and adjust the dropout to fit. Depending on the other requirements, the rake might be tough to get right, but it should be possible to get close, and should have the look you are after.

If the integrated disc tab is about fear of failure/safety concerns, fix it by practicing and destructively testing your joining skills/joints, not by sidestepping the problem on one component. If getting the disc tab positioned correctly is the intimidating part, I suggest either using the brake as a jig (avid BB7 with the washers replaced with flat, non misaligning washers is the best bodge fix jig I know of because you can lock the caliper onto the disc without a cable in it), or you can spend some money on one of Anvil's fungshui tools and be sure getting the disc brake tab in the right spot is a breeze. If you balk at the cost of that tool, this hobby isn't for you. I'll say that again! If you balk at the cost of that tool, this hobby isn't for you. If it sounds like I am just being a jerk, think about the effort I just put into this post....
 

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rocwandrer said:
wow. Some stress here.

To the OP. You phrase things in a certain way, and said it doesn't matter if the parts are steel or aluminum. These are clues (wrong or right) that you might be just a dreamer. Still, I think TMM's reply was a little harsh. I can remember back when he was asking equally "dreamer" questions on Josh Putnam's mailing list in the early to mid 90's :D

My (edit, no longer short) answer to your original question:

The rear dropouts: use something off the shelf. it avoids the additional time/steps/skills to make your own and they will work fine on a hardtail. Alternately, make your own, or pay to have them made to your design. those are probably the options. If you really want a high chainstay style dropout, you might be able to cleverly modify a surly disc dropout.

Front: best shot at that is Ceeway's 1.125" plug in (they have them in 2 different offsets even) combined with an old bolt on suspension fork crown that is close enough to the right size for the tubing you pick that you can silver a shim on the tube, or ream the hole, or use a metric tube and adjust the dropout to fit. Depending on the other requirements, the rake might be tough to get right, but it should be possible to get close, and should have the look you are after.

If the integrated disc tab is about fear of failure/safety concerns, fix it by practicing and destructively testing your joining skills/joints, not by sidestepping the problem on one component. If getting the disc tab positioned correctly is the intimidating part, I suggest either using the brake as a jig (avid BB7 with the washers replaced with flat, non misaligning washers is the best bodge fix jig I know of because you can lock the caliper onto the disc without a cable in it), or you can spend some money on one of Anvil's fungshui tools and be sure getting the disc brake tab in the right spot is a breeze. If you balk at the cost of that tool, this hobby isn't for you. I'll say that again! If you balk at the cost of that tool, this hobby isn't for you. If it sounds like I am just being a jerk, think about the effort I just put into this post....
Awsome. All good advice. Does'nt sound like you are being a jerk at all to me.
Thanks for taking the time to write.
 
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