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Is it even economical to do this? I have a G2 Rockshox 32 solo air on it and an slx drivetrain.

It is a 2013 trek Marlin.

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My 2 cents: buy a newer complete bike, and sell the marlin complete. Not sure if you're thinking about buying a new FS frame, or used, but you'll probably be hard-pressed to find a frame newer than 2016 that will fit all of your old parts (wheels front der. especially), due to changing standards...
 

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It's almost impossible to do a frame swap without changing SOMETHING. At minimum, things like headset, bottom bracket, and seatpost have to change.

With the kind of age difference you're talking about here, it's unlikely you'll find something where you'll be able to use the same stem/bars, too, because of the changes in frame geometries since 2013. The big one will be the wheels. Your bike uses non-boost quick release hubs. That effectively means you'll need new wheels.

So, effectively, no, this is not economical or even wise. There are some parts you'll be able to move over, but not so many. You'd be better off buying a complete bike.
 

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I've done a frame swap before, and it was only economical because I went from/to a similar travel frame from the same manufacturer. Therefore the shock was the same size, same BB standard, headtube/headset, etc. I still had to get new cables/housing (used cut-down derailleur cable for dropper post cable), new rear brake line, and brake caliper adapters. I also built the old bike piece by piece, so it had all the parts I wanted on the new bike. Parts that are rare on complete bikes, like an E13 cassette and Manitou Mattoc fork for example.

In the case of "I already have a bike, why wouldn't I just transfer parts to a new better frame?", it's usually not as easy. By time you swap out things that don't match the standards of the new frame, you could've got more for your money by selling complete, and buying complete. I believe the Marlin is a straight steerer tube? So the fork wouldn't work, at least without a special headset. It's QR too? Wheels won't work on a modern frame, especially because boost is the way of the future.
 

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I have done many frame swaps over the years. I went through all the following frames using parts from the previous frame....

2003 Heckler
2004 Azonic Saber
2008 Iron Horse MKIII
2010 Marin Mt Vision
2011 Turner 5-Spot
2012 Turner 5-Spot.

I needed to convert my rear hub for the last one. On some builds I needed a new headset, front derailleur, or shim for the dropper post. Might need a stem for fit. Of course new cables and housing.

In other words, all of these happened for not much expense beyond the cost of the frame.

However, things are not going to work like that this time around. New wheel sizes and hub standards make all my big ticket items pretty useless, so I’ll be going with a whole bike next time around..... which is why instead of continuing to get something new every other year I am still nursing my 2012 5-Spot along.

As far as if it makes sense for you, you need to look at the specifics of what will fit and what will not.

Also, what parts do you think you may want to upgrade? Even it everything fits (assuming you can convert your hubs*, which I would not count on), if you end up wanting a new fork next, then you would have probably been better off just buying a new bike with a better fork already on it.

*EDIT: Actually, if you are re-using your current fork, you don’t have to worry about the front hub.

The more I think about it, as long as we are talking about the same wheelsize, and if the fork and wheels are appropriate for the type of FS frame you get (e.g., you are not sticking XC wheels and fork on an AM frame), this might not be all that hard or expensive. You would need a new headset for a tapered head tube frame (or at least the bottom half) but that is not too big of a purchase. Might need a new bottom bracket. It mostly comes down the the compatibility (or convertability) of the rear hub.

Finances aside, building a bike is a very good way to learn most mechanic skills relevant to your bike.
 
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